Stephen Zunes on Non-violent Resistance in Ukraine & Kshama Savant Seattle Socialist Leader

program: 
Air Cascadia
program date: 
Tue, 06/03/2014
This straight out of the Wiki, but interesting in context.  Stephen Zunes was our guest on Monday and the topic was 'Peaceful  Non-violent Resistence in Ukraine and Crimea'. The tactic is a real piss-cutter as far as the Powers that Be are concerned; The less danger, the more people who turn out. Consider Ukraine...Many people in American newsrooms hear rthe words, 'Ukraine' and 'Crimea' and nothing comes to mind. No images, no recognition, no recollection of reading history, no insight into the complex knot of culture, social reality, geopolitics.  The names ring only tiny, faint bells.
So, for the record:

The Yalta Conference, sometimes called the Crimea Conference and codenamed the Argonaut Conference, held February 4–11, 1945, was the World War II meeting of the heads of government of the United States, the United Kingdom and the Soviet Union, represented by President Franklin D. Roosevelt, Prime Minister Winston Churchill and Premier Joseph Stalin, respectively, for the purpose of discussing Europe's post-war reorganization. The conference convened in the Livadia Palace near Yalta in Crimea.
The meeting was intended mainly to discuss the re-establishment of the nations of war-torn Europe. Within a few years, with the Cold War dividing the continent, Yalta became a subject of intense controversy. To some extent, it has remained controversial.
 
In 1905 Odessa was the site of a workers' uprising supported by the crew of the Russian battleship Potemkin (also see Battleship Potemkin uprising) and Lenin's Iskra. Sergei Eisenstein's famous motion picture The Battleship Potemkin commemorated the uprising and included a scene where hundreds of Odessan citizens were murdered on the great stone staircase (now popularly known as the "Potemkin Steps"), in one of the most famous scenes in motion picture history. At the top of the steps, which lead down to the port, stands a statue of the Duc de Richelieu. The actual massacre took place in streets nearby, not on the steps themselves, but the film caused many to visit Odessa to see the site of the "slaughter". The "Odessa Steps" continue to be a tourist attraction in Odessa. The film was made at Odessa's Cinema Factory, one of the oldest cinema studios in the former Soviet Union.

 

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