War & Peace

Radiozine

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Program: 
Radiozine
Air date: 
Fri, 11/21/2008 - 9:00am - 9:30am

Host Per Fagereng speaks with Robert Parry, award-winning investigative journalist for Consortium News. Parry's books include Lost History: Contras, Cocaine, the Press & "Project Truth;" Secrecy & Privilege: Rise of the Bush Dynasty from Watergate to Iraq; Secrecy and Privilege: the Rise of the Bush Dynasty from Watergate to Iraq and "Neck Deep: The Disastrous Presidency of George W. Bush," written with two of his sons, Sam and Nat..

Veteran's Voice

Air date: 
Wed, 11/19/2008 - 9:00am - 10:00am

Members of Northwest Vets for Peace interview Michael Schwartz, author of War Without End: the Iraq War in Context.

Michael Schwartz, professor of sociology and faculty director of the Undergraduate College of Global Studies at Stony Brook University, has written extensively on the war in Iraq at websites including TomDispatch, ZNet, Asia Times, and Mother Jones, and in numerous magazines, including Contexts, Against the Current, and Z Magazine.

 

Flashpoints

Program: 
Flashpoints
Air date: 
Tue, 11/18/2008 - 11:15am - 12:00pm

Host Dennis Bernstein looks at the Status of Forces Agreement between the U.S. and Iraq, and he interviews Father Louie Vitale about the national movement to resist torture at Fort Huachuca, the military installation in Arizona where the U.S. trains officers in “Enhanced Interrogation” tactics such as water boarding.

Peter Erlinder on Congo

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program: 
Radiozine
program date: 
Wed, 11/12/2008

Per Fagereng speaks with Peter Erlinder about Rwanda and the war in eastern Congo

28:57 minutes (26.51 MB)

Flashpoints

Program: 
Flashpoints
Air date: 
Thu, 11/13/2008 - 11:15am - 12:00pm

Topics include a report from occupied Gaza, the crisis of displaced refugees in Congo, and former Presidential candidate Cynthia McKinney reflects on the election and the future of President-Elect Obama.

Radiozine

Program: 
Radiozine
Air date: 
Thu, 11/13/2008 - 10:00am - 10:30am

Host Per Fagereng interviews journalist, professor and lawyer Peter Erlinder, who has done legal work in Rwanda, about the upsurge of fighting in Congo and its relationship to Rwanda.

Hunger Strike for Oregon National Guard

program: 
Evening News
program date: 
Mon, 11/10/2008

Michele Darr is in the same spot she has been for the past eleven days; camping and on hunger strike at the steps of governor Ted Kulongoski’s office in salem.   She wants a meeting with the governor and a chance to dissuade him from sending oregon's National Guard to serve in Iraq.  Michele is dismayed with the deployment and with the Bush Administration's “Stop Loss” policy which involuntarily extends a service member's active duty.

1:08 minutes (1.04 MB)

The Decider

 Apropos of my post below, Obama is planning to review the plethora of onerous executive orders issued by President Bush:

President-elect Barack Obama is poised to move swiftly to reverse actions that President Bush took using executive authority, and his transition team is reviewing limits on stem-cell research and the expansion of oil and gas drilling, among other issues, members of the team said Sunday.

Clearly, much more needs to be reviewed besides the issues mentioned above, but for a guy who's more than a month from taking office, this is a very encouraging start.

-A

Back from the brink

 While I'm still processing the full import of Obama's win -- I'll blog about it more later -- one very, very encouraging item that's popped up is his intention to close the prison at Guantanamo Bay. From Spencer Ackerman:

 

Less than a week after his election, and more than two months before he takes office, Barack Obama is signaling that this monstrosity is coming to an end. This, I submit -- to my uncle and anyone else --  is change you can believe in. The AP, via Time:

"President-elect Obama's advisers are quietly crafting a proposal to ship dozens, if not hundreds, of imprisoned terrorism suspects to the United States to face criminal trials, a plan that would make good on his promise to close the Guantanamo Bay prison but could require creation of a controversial new system of justice."

 

The news that the Guantanamo prisioners will come to the United States to stand trial is, by any measure, outstanding news. The illegal dentention of War on Terra prisoners has been a long-standing affront to our collective humanity, it's beneath us, and it's high time that it comes to an end. The "creation of a controversial new system of justice" referenced above is, I think, a bit of hyperbole from the AP -- the judicial power of the United States, after all, is "vested in one Supreme Court, and in such inferior courts as the Congress may from time to time ordain and establish."

So the Constitution already provides for the establishment of courts as necessary, and really, U.S. law already provides ground on which to deal with the people in Guantanamo and the crimes for which they are accused might eventually be accused. That they have been detained as they are, and that they have yet to be chanrged with crimes, is one of the Bush administration's more egregious legacies. Good on Obama for already signaling that Guantanamo will be closed.

-A

Lyn Moelich Interviews Michael Mead & Veterens on Welcome Home Project

Categories:
program: 
Radiozine
program date: 
Thu, 11/06/2008
26:42 minutes (24.45 MB)
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