Between the Covers

A weekly show featuring interviews with locally and nationally known authors of both fiction and non-fiction.

Episode Archive

Tom Spanbauer, critically acclaimed author and founder of Dangerous Writing.

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 04/17/2014 - 11:00am - 12:00pm
Short Description: 
Tom Spanbauer, critically acclaimed author and founder of Dangerous Writing.

Between the Covers welcomes local author and writing teacher Tom Spanbauer to discuss his new novel, I Loved You More. 

Praying Drunk by Kyle Minor

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 04/10/2014 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Praying Drunk by Kyle Minor

The characters in Praying Drunk speak in tongues, torture their classmates, fall in love, hunt for immortality, abandon their children, keep machetes beneath passenger seats, and collect porcelain figurines. From Kentucky to Florida to Haiti, these seemingly disparate lives are woven together within a series of nested repetitions, enacting the struggle to remain physically and spiritually alive throughout the untamable turbulence of their worlds. In a masterful blend of fiction, autobiography, and surrealism, Kyle Minor shows us that the space between fearlessness and terror is often very small. Long before Praying Drunk reaches its plaintive, pitch-perfect end, Minor establishes himself again and again as one of the most talented younger writers in America.

Portland author Nicole Mones on her novel NIGHT IN SHANGHAI

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 04/03/2014 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Portland author Nicole Mones on her novel NIGHT IN SHANGHAI

Host Lisa Loving speaks with Portland author Nicole Mones about her latest novel, NIGHT IN SHANGHAI, which illuminates the pivotal role of African-American musicians in the Chinese jazz age.  Recruited from the depths of the Depression, whisked to the epicenter of Asia’s hottest nightlife, these jazz players found wealth, freedom, and fame beyond their dreams, only to be caught up in the outbreak of World War II. The novel’s Thomas Greene , a classically trained Baltimore piano player, is tapped to lead a Shanghai swing orchestra. Soon success is his, prestige, illicit love with the brilliant and unavailable Song Yuhua… it’s paradise, and he never wants to leave. But war and revolution pull his w

Boy, Snow, Bird by Helen Oyeyemi

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 03/27/2014 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Boy, Snow, Bird by Helen Oyeyemi

Willy Vlautin talks about his new novel, "The Free".

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 03/20/2014 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Willy Vlautin talks about his new novel, "The Free".

Host Jay Thiemeyer interviews local author Willy Vlautin about his new novel, The Free.

The book follows the story of Leroy Kervin who has lived in a group home for eight years after being severely injured in the Iraq War. Frustrated by the simplest daily routines, he finds his existence has become unbearable. An act of desperation helps him disappear deep into his mind, into a world of romance and science fiction, danger and adventure where he is whole once again.

Willy Vlautin is the author of three other novels: The Motel Life, Northline, and Lean on Pete, which won two Oregon Book Awards. He is the singer and songwriter of the band Richmond Fontaine and lives in Scappoose, Oregon.

A Life In Men by Gina Frangello

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 03/13/2014 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
A Life In Men by Gina Frangello

The friendship between Mary and Nix has endured since childhood, a seemingly unbreakable bond, until the mid-1980s, when the two young women reunite for a summer vacation in Greece. It's a trip instigated by Nix, who has just learned that Mary has been diagnosed with a disease that will inevitably cut her life short. Nix, a free spirit by nature, is determined that Mary have the vacation of a lifetime, but by the time their visit to Greece is over, the ties between them have unraveled, and when they said goodbye, it's for the last time.  “Ambitious in breadth and scope, this work will appeal to fans of Barbara Kingsolver and those who like being immersed in foreign settings.” —Library Journal

The Fisherpoets Anthology: Anchored in Deep Water

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 03/06/2014 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Chelsea Stephen and Patrick Dixon discuss The Fisherpoets Anthology: Anchored in Deep Water

Illustrator Chelsea Stephen and photographer and writer Patrick Dixon talk about the Fisherpoets Anthology.

Chelsea Stephen is a freelance illustrator living in Portland.

Patrick Dixon is the curator and web designer of IntheTote. He is a member of the organizing committee for the Fisherpoets Gathering. A retired educator, he works as a freelance photographer and writer based in Olympia, Washington

The Fisherpoets Anthology: Anchored in Deep Water, is a seven-book set that is nearing completion. Over 35 poets from the USA, Canada and Japan are represented, with seven interviews of the fishermen and women engaged in commercial fishing along the coasts of the North American continent. 

The Gods of Second Chances, debut novel by local author Dan Berne

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 02/27/2014 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
The Gods of Second Chances, local author Dan Berne

Between the Covers welcomes local author, Dan Berne.  His debut novel, The Gods of Second Chances, is the first novel release from local publisher, Forest Avenue Press.

The Gods of Second Chances is the story of a man overwhelmed by things beyond his control--a granddaughter on the verge of adolescence, a daughter returning from prison rehab, a frivolous lawsuit, and falling for the one woman he can't have--all the while trying to fish his living out of a fickle ocean in the mercurial weather of Southeast Alaska.  It's no wonder one god isn't enough for him--Leigh Anne Kranz 
 

On Such A Full Sea by Chang-rae Lee

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 02/20/2014 - 11:00am - 11:40am
Short Description: 
On Such A Full Sea by Chang-rae Lee
 
"The most striking dystopian novels sound an alarm, focus our attention and even change the language. The Handmaid’s Tale crystallized our fears about reproductive control; Fahrenheit 451 still flames discussions of censorship; and 1984 is the lens through which we watch the Obama administration watching us. Chang-rae Lee’s unsettling new novel, On Such a Full Sea, arrives from that same frightening realm of total oversight and pinched individuality. . . . A brilliant, deeply unnerving portrait."—The Washington Post 

Harriet Scott Chessman on The Beauty of Ordinary Things

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 02/13/2014 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Harriet Scott Chessman talks about her new novel The Beauty of Ordinary Things

The guest is Harriet Scott Chessman, whose new novel is The Beauty of Ordinary Thingsreleased this winter by Atelier26.

Chessman is the author of Lydia Cassatt Reading the Morning Paper and Someone Not Really Her Mother.

The Beauty of Ordinary Things, set in the early 1970s, concerns the unlikely love and friendship between a young Vietnam veteran and a Benedictine nun. The renowned Ron Hansen calls The Beauty of Ordinary Things “a soulful, tender, affecting novel, with complex, searching, sympathetic characters whose situations and plights one deeply cares about."

Audio

Peter Mountford discusses recent novel: "A Young Man's Guide to Late Capitalism"

program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Wed, 04/13/2011

Host Marianne Barisonek speaks with fiction writer Peter Mountford about his new novel A Young Man's Guide to Late Capitalism, which tells the story of Gabriel de Boya, a recent college graduate who works for an unscrupulous hedge fund while pretending to be a freelance journalist. Mountford drew on his own experience for the book. Just out of college, he was hired to write about the economy of Ecuador for a nonprofit think tank. He later discovered that the think tank was running a hedge fund out of its back office.

Jess Walters, author of "The Financial Lives of the Poets" describes "A Young Man's GUide to Late Capitalism" as a "parable of the voracious global economy." 

Mystery writer Rhys Bowen discusses "Royal Flush"

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program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Wed, 04/06/2011

Ed Goldberg interviews Rhys Bowen author of Royal Flush, a mystery set in a Scottish castle with Lady Georgiana Rannoch in her third madcap adventure.  Humor and history combine in this novel that also includes a group of demanding Americans, ghosts, haggis, a monster in the Loch, and a sinister someone with a gun.   

Mystery writer Lisa Gardner on her new novel "Love You More"

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Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 03/31/2011

Host Ed Goldberg interviews mystery suspense author Lisa Gardner about her new novel Love You More. In Love You More the crime appears open-and-shut: Pushed to the brink by an abusive husband, state police trooper Tessa Leoni finally snapped and shot him in self-defense. But Tessa isn’t talking–not about her dead husband, her battered face, or her missing six-year old daughter. Now, Detective D.D. Warren will have to race against the clock to unearth family secrets, solve a murder and save a child.

Patty Somlo on her book "From Here to There and Other Stories"

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Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 03/24/2011

Host Marianne Barisonek speaks with Portlander and former journalist Patty Somlo about her newest book, From Here to There And Other Stories. Patty Somlo is a short story writer who makes occasional forays into non-fiction. Her work has been published in numerous print and online publications, including the San Francisco Chronicle, San Francisco Examiner, Baltimore Sun, Seattle Post-Intelligencer, The Oregonian, Santa Clara Review, Fringe Magazine, Guernica, Common Boundary: Stories of Immigration (Editions Bibliotekos), and the Los Angeles Review. Patty has served as an associate editor for Pacific News Service in San Francisco and as a member of the editorial collective for VoiceCatcher, an annual anthology featuring the writings of women from Portland, Oregon. She holds an M.A. in English with a concentration in Creative Writing from San Francisco State University.

  • Length: 26:40 minutes (24.41 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Stereo 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Gemma Whelan talks about her novel "Fiona: Stolen Child"

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Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 03/17/2011

  In the novel Fiona Clarke, an Irish writer living in New York, has been running away from her past since she left rural Cregora, Ireland, for boarding school. That past finds her, many years later, when her thinly veiled autobiographical novel is optioned for a movie. Working as the film’s consultant, Fiona unearths deep secrets, relives childhood trauma, and connects with an estranged family thrust back into her life. As her history opens upon her, Fiona must stop running and confront her secret shame: her long-held sense of responsibility over the death of her little sister.

Host Marianne Barisonek interviews author Gemma Whelan, an Irish-born theatre director and educator. After moving to the San Francisco Bay Area, Whelan directed more than sixty stage productions and was founding artistic director of GemArt and Wilde Irish Productions. Gemma is also an award-winning screenwriter and film director. She graduated from Trinity College, Dublin in English and French, and has graduate degrees from University of California, Berkeley in Theatre and San Francisco State University in Cinema. Gemma lives in Portland.

Cynthia Grant Tucker author of "No Silent Witness" on women who influenced liberal culture in PDX, U.S.

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Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 03/10/2011

Guest Cynthia Grant Tucker, author of No Silent Witness: the Eliot Parsonage Women and their Unitarian World,  discusses the stories of the women who influenced the liberal culture of America, particularly here in Portland.

"No Silent Witness" is a group biography which follows three generations of ministers' daughters and wives in a famed American Unitarian family. Spanning 150 years from the early 19th century forward, the narrative divides into six chapters. Each chapter takes up a different woman's defining experience, from the deaths of numerous children and the anguish of infertility to the suffocation of small parish life with its chronic loneliness, doubt, and resentment. All of the stories are linked by the women's continuing battles to make themselves heard over clerical wisdom that contradicts their reality.

Cynthia Grant Tucker also spoke in Portland on "The Remarkable Eliot Women" on Friday, March 11th from 7-8:30PM at the First Unitarian Church at 1101 SW 12th Avenue in Portland. 

 

Author Jennifer Lauck on "Found: A Memoir"

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program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 03/03/2011

The guest is Portland journalist and author Jennifer Lauck. She is the author of the previous memoirs Blackbird and Still Waters. She worked for eight years in television news before becoming a memoir writer, speaker and teacher.

Jennifer Lauck's fourth and final memoir is titled Found: A Memoir  & True Sequel to Blackbird which is about the search and reunion with her birth mother. Her writing explores the complexity of human existence as well as the depths of loss. By ten, she was homeless in Los Angeles, after the deaths of her adoptive mother and father. Raised by extended family, she also suffered the loss of her adoptive brother who took his life when she was 20 years old. Lauck writes and speaks about perseverance, courage and the remarkable capacity of humans to transcend the worst of losses with grace  

 

Tom Rachman on "The Imperfectionists" -- novel of a Roman newspaper and its staff

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Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 02/24/2011

Ed Goldberg interviews Tom Rachman, author of The Imperfectionists, a novel about a newspaper in Rome and the characters that staff it.

Tom Rachman was born in 1974 in London, but grew up in Vancouver. He studied cinema at the University of Toronto and completed a Master's degree in journalism at Columbia University in New York. From 1998, he worked as an editor at the foreign desk of The Associated Press in New York, then did a stint as a reporter in India and Sri Lanka, before returning to New York. In 2002, he was sent to Rome as an AP correspondent, with assignments taking him to Japan, South Korea, Turkey and Egypt. Beginning in 2006, he worked part-time as an editor at the International Herald Tribune in Paris to support himself while writing fiction. He now lives in London, where he is working on his second novel. 

Novelist Mary Roninette Kowal on her regency fantasy: "Shades of Milk and Honey"

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program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Fri, 02/11/2011

Host Marianne Barisonek speaks with Mary Robinette Kowal the author of Shades of Milk and Honey, an intimate portrait of Jane Ellsworth, a woman ahead of her time in a version of Regency England where the manipulation of glamour is considered an essential skill for a lady of quality. 

In 2008 Mary Robinette Kowal received the Campbell Award for Best New Writer.  She was a 2009 Hugo nominee for her story “Evil Robot Monkey.” Her stories have appeared in Strange Horizons, Asimov’s, and several Year’s Best anthologies as well as her short story collection Scenting the Dark and Other Stories from Subterranean Press.

Mary, a professional puppeteer and voice actor, has performed for LazyTown (CBS), the Center for Puppetry Arts, Jim Henson Pictures and founded N. Her designs have garnered two UNIMA-USA Citations of Excellence, the highest award an American puppeteer can achieve. She also records fiction for authors such as Kage Baker, Cory Doctorow and John Scalzi.

She is the Vice President of Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America. Mary lives in Portland, OR with her husband Rob and over a dozen manual typewriters.

 

Writer Alice Hoffman on "The Red Garden," linked stories of rural Massachussets

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program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 02/03/2011

Distinguished writer Alice Hoffman talks about her new book, The Red Garden, a collection of linked fictions about a small town in Massachusetts where a garden holds the secrets of many lives.
Alice Hoffman  has published a total of eighteen novels, two books of short fiction, and eight books for children and young adults.
 

  • Length: 17:07 minutes (7.83 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 64Kbps (CBR)

Comments

Timber Beasts

I've read the book twice and rather hoped to hear the program that the author spoke on the book. But that page was not available on your site. Anyway, I loved the book. I thought it was an exciting dose of history. Stoner brought the Portland of  1900 to life. There was intrigue that kept my interest throughout the book.

Today's Interview

I was washing eggs at the farm when this came on. I loved it and looked for it to share with my peeps!

 

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