Between the Covers

A weekly show featuring interviews with locally and nationally known authors of both fiction and non-fiction.

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Cliff Ashpaugh on his debut novel "Josh's Wall"
All Our Names by Dinaw Mengestu
 

Episode Archive

Cliff Ashpaugh on his debut novel "Josh's Wall"

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 07/24/2014 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Cliff Ashpaugh on his debut novel "Josh's Wall"

Cliff Ashpaugh talks about his debut novella, JOSH’S WALL (Spout Hill Press; July 2014). Set in the early 1960s in the wilds of San Gabriel Valley, it’s a coming-of-age story about a boy who wakes up to a world of bullies, liars, and strangers—including himself.

At age six, Joshua Crass is reborn—after nearly dying from an allergic reaction to penicillin. Struggling with lingering anemia and amnesia, he leaves the hospital with three people—Mom, Dad, and brother Sammy—who might as well be Martians. Apart from his beloved Nanny (the only family member he remembers), Josh feels like an orphan in his own home. 

Smith Henderson on his novel "Fourth of July Creek"

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 07/17/2014 - 11:00am - 12:00pm
Short Description: 
Smith Henderson on his novel "Fourth of July Creek"

Host Jay Thiemeyer speaks with Smith Henderson about his novel "Fourth of July Creek."  Henderson explores the complexities of freedom, community, grace, suspicion and anarchy, depicting our nation's disquieting and violent contradictions.

Smith Henderson is the recipient of the 2011 PEN Emerging Writers Award in fiction. He was a Philip Roth Resident in Creative Writing at Bucknell University, a Pushcart Prize winner, and a fellow at the Michener Center for Writers in Austin, Texas. Born and raised in Montana, he now lives in Portland, Oregon.

Local Author Polly Dugan: So Much a Part of You

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 07/10/2014 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Local Author Polly Dugan: So Much a Part of You

Between the Covers welcomes local author, Polly Dugan, in conversation about her debut short story collection, So Much a Part of You.

Today the kitchen, tomorrow the world!

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 07/03/2014 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Tod Davies talks with Lyn Moelich about her book Jam Today Too: the Revolution Will Not Be Catered

Author and Senior Editor at Exterminating Angel Press, Tod Davies talks with host Lyn Moelich about her latest book  in the Jam Today series Jam Today Too: the Revolution Will Not Be Catered. Like Kate Christensen and Jim Harrison, Davies is a novelist - and amateur cook ---who brings all of her literary talents to the Jam Today series. This book is a rich stew of stories and recipes which entice cooks of every level to tell their own storys through the food they cook. Think MFK Fisher as an anarchist and you've got Tod Davies. Tod Will be speaking at Powell's Books on Hawthorne on July 3rd at 7:30pm.

My Real Children by Jo Walton

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 06/26/2014 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
My Real Children by Jo Walton

It’s 2015, and Patricia Cowan is very old. “Confused today,” read the notes clipped to the end of her bed. She forgets things she should know—what year it is, major events in the lives of her children. But she remembers things that don't seem possible. She remembers marrying Mark and having four children. And she remembers not marrying Mark and raising three children with Bee instead. She remembers the bomb that killed President Kennedy in 1963, and she remembers Kennedy in 1964, declining to run again after the nuclear exchange that took out Miami and Kiev.  Two lives, two worlds, two versions of modern history; each with their loves and losses, their sorrows and triumphs.

Portland-based author Jason Beem on his first novel "Southbound"

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 06/19/2014 - 11:00am - 12:00pm
Short Description: 
Portland-based author Jason Beem on his first novel "Southbound"

Host Ken Jones talks with Portland-based author Jason Beem about his first novel Southbound. The book follows a recovering gambling addict who, in the wake of losing his job for the summer, and his girlfriend, makes a gambling pilgrimage to the big three Southern California horse racing tracks in search of one last big score. Jason himself is a track announcer at Portland Meadows and a recovering gambling addict, which makes for an interesting combination. He’s also working towards a Masters degree in addiction counseling at Lewis & Clark College.
 

An Untamed State by Roxane Gay

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 06/12/2014 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
An Untamed State by Roxane Gay

Roxane Gay is a powerful new literary voice whose short stories and essays have already earned her an enthusiastic audience. In An Untamed State, she delivers an assured debut about a woman kidnapped for ransom, her captivity as her father refuses to pay and her husband fights for her release over thirteen days, and her struggle to come to terms with the ordeal in its aftermath.  An Untamed State is a novel of privilege in the face of crushing poverty, and of the lawless anger that corrupt governments produce. It is the story of a willful woman attempting to find her way back to the person she once was, and of how redemption is found in the most unexpected of places.

Author Phil Klay on his novel "Redeployment" and the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 06/05/2014 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Author Phil Klay on his novel "Redeployment" and the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan

Host Jim Schumock speaks with Phil Klay about his novel "Redeployment," which takes readers to the frontlines of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, asking us to understand what happened there, and what happened to the soldiers who returned.  Interwoven with themes of brutality and faith, guilt and fear, helplessness and survival, the characters in these stories struggle to make meaning out of chaos.

A Wooden Leg: A Novel in 64 Cards by Leni Zumas and Luca DiPierro

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 05/29/2014 - 11:00am - 12:00pm
Short Description: 
A Wooden Leg: A Novel in 64 Cards by Leni Zumas and Luca DiPierro

Leni Zumas and Luca DiPierro's A Wooden Leg is a novel in 64 cards, consisting of 64 drawings and corresponding captions which the reader is free to arrange into a variety of narrative and visual sequences.

The Other Side of Paradise: Life in the New Cuba, by Julia Cooke

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 05/22/2014 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
The Other Side of Paradise: Life in the New Cuba, by Julia Cooke

Host Sarika Mehta speaks with Portland born-and-raised journalist Julia Cooke about her new book The Other Side of Paradise: Life in the New Cuba, which combines narrative with detailed reporting and shares the unique stories of those Cooke encountered during time spent in Havana.

Julia Cooke is a freelance journalist and teacher who has lived in and reported from Mexico City and Havana. Her essays about Cuba have been published in Conde Nast Traveller, the Virginia Quarterly Review, and The Best Women’s Travel Writing anthology, among numerous newspapers and magazines. Cooke grew up in Portland, Oregon, and now lives in New York City, where she writes and teaches at the New School. 
 

Audio

Alafair Burke on her latest mystery, "212"

Categories:
program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 05/06/2010

Host Ed Goldberg speaks with writer Alistair Burke about her third white-knuckle thriller "212." NYPD Detective Ellie Hatcher and her partner, J.J. Rogan are investigating the murder of NYU student Megan Gunther, who's the target of threatening posts on a college gossip Web site. The death of bodyguard Robert Robo Mancini, whose bullet-ridden corpse turns up in a swanky new building, the 212, built by Sam Sparks, the high-powered Manhattan real-estate developer Robo worked for, ups the ante. When Sam makes it clear that the police won't have access to any company records, Ellie's interest is piqued. As she and J.J. try to piece together Megan's life, they discover a link between the student and a recently murdered real estate agent. With her usual tenacity, Ellie pursues leads that put both her career and her life at risk. Burke expertly weaves real-life headlines into her plot—particularly the Craig's List Killer and the slew of recent political scandals—without ever sacrificing originality.

Sarah Dunant on "Sacred Hearts," a novel of intrigue in a 16th century Italian convent

Categories:
program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 04/29/2010

Sarah Dunant is the author of the international bestseller The Birth of Venus, which has received major worldwide acclaim and In the Company of the Courtesan. With the publication of Sacred Hearts, she rounds out a Renaissance trilogy bringing voice to the lives of three different women in three different historical contexts. Sarah Dunant’s research has resulted in vivid reconstructions of womens’secret histories in the characters of a Florentine Noblewoman, a Venetian Courtesan and with Sacred Hearts the lives of the Sisters of Santa Caterina.

Author Susan Douglas discusses "Enlightened Sexism: The Seductive Message that Feminism's Work Is Done"

Categories:
program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 04/29/2010
Host Kathleen Stephenson speaks with Susan Douglas about her new book, Enlightened Sexism: The Seductive Message that Feminism's Work Is Done. Douglas exposes popular images of women in the media as mere fantasies of female power, assuring women and girls that the battle for equality has been won, so there’s nothing wrong with resurrecting sexist stereotypes—all in good fun, of course. She shows that these portrayals not only distract us from the real-world challenges facing women today but also drive a wedge between baby-boom women and their “millennial” daughters.

Susan J. Douglas is the author of Where the Girls Are, The Mommy Myth, and other works of cultural history and criticism. She is the Catherine Neafie Kellogg Professor of Communication Studies and chair of the department at the University of Michigan, where she has taught since 1996. Her work has appeared in The Nation, The Progressive, Ms., The Village Voice, and In These Times. She lives in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Novelist Susan Stoner discusses her PDX historical mystery: "Timber Beasts"

Categories:
program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Fri, 04/09/2010
Host Marianne Barisonek interviews Susan Stoner, author of Timber BeastsStoner , general counsel at Portland-headquartered Amalgamated Transit Union Local 757 — worked in her free time to develop a series of historical mysteries set in the Portland of 1902. Now the first published installment is in print, and is garnering favorable reactions from local historians and labor history buffs. Jim Strassmeier, longtime oral historian for the Oregon Historical Society, called it a “unique, genre-crossing novel” that “combines rousing adventure with accurate back-to-the-past details.”

Mystery writer Dana Stabenow: "A Night Too Dark"

Categories:
program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 04/01/2010

Host Ed Goldberg speaks with Dana Stabenow, author of A Night Too Dark, a mystery set in the Bush Country of Alaska.  Stabenow has produced works in the science fiction, mystery, and suspense/thriller genres. Many of her books are set in her home state of Alaska, where she was raised by her single mother who lived and worked on a fish tender in the Gulf of Alaska. 

Chris Bohjalian on his novel: "Secrets of Eden"

Categories:
program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 03/25/2010

On the March 25, 2010, airing of Between the Covers, host Crystal Leighty interviews Chris Bohjalian, the author of thirteen books, including the new novel, Secrets of Eden, a story of shattered faith, intimate secrets and the delicate exploration of the nature of sacrifice.

Author Audrey Niffenegger on "Her Fearful Symmetry"

Categories:
program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 03/18/2010

Host Ed Goldberg interviews Audrey Niffenegger, author of Her Fearful Symmetry, a ghost story involving two sets of twins.

Audrey Niffenegger is a visual artist and a guide at Highgate Cemetery. In addition to her bestselling debut novel, The Time Traveler’s Wife, she is the author of two illustrated novels. She lives in Chicago.

Annie Barrows, co-author of "The Guernsey Literary and Potato Pie Society"

Categories:
program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 03/11/2010

Host Ed Goldberg speaks with Annie Barrows, co-author of The Guernsey Literary and Potato Pie Society, a novel of love and intrigue on an island in the English Channel in 1946.

Mary Ann Shaffer became interested in Guernsey while visiting London in 1976. On a whim, she decided to fly to Guernsey but became stranded there when a thick fog descended and all boats and planes were forbidden to leave the island. As she waited for the fog to lift, warming herself by the heat of the hand-dryer in the men's restroom, she read all the books in the Guernsey airport bookstore, including Jersey under the Jack-Boot. Thus began her fascination with the German Occupation of the Channel Islands.

Many years later, when goaded by her book club to write a novel, Mary Ann naturally thought of Guernsey. She chose to write in the epistolary form because, "for some bizarre reason, I thought it would be easier." Several years of work yielded The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society, which was greeted with avid enthusiasm, first by her family, then by her writing group, and finally by publishers around the world. Sadly, Mary Ann's health began to decline shortly thereafter, and she asked her niece, Annie Barrows, to help her finish the book.

Mary Ann Shaffer was born in Martinsburg, West Virginia, in 1934. Her career included libraries, bookstores, and publishing, but her life-long dream was to "write a book that someone would like enough to publish." Though she did not live to see it, this dream has been realized in The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society.

Annie Barrows, whose career also included libraries, bookstores, and publishing, is the author of the

Ivy and Bean

series for children, as well as

The Magic Half

Mentors, Muses and Monsters: Thirty Writers on the People Who Changed Their Lives

Categories:
program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 03/04/2010

Writer and teacher Elizabeth Benedict talks about "Mentors, Muses and Monsters: Thirty Writers on the People Who Changed Their Lives." She edited the book, which features essays by Elizabeth Benedict * Robert Boyers * Jay Cantor * John Casey * Maud Casey * Christopher Castellani * Alexander Chee * Michael Cunningham * Jonathan Safran Foer * Julia Glass * Mary Gordon * Neil Gordon * Arnon Grunberg * Samantha Hunt * Denis Johnson * Margot Livesey * Dinaw Mengestu * Sigrid Nunez * Joyce Carol Oates * ZZ Packer * Caryl Phillips * Carolyn See * Jim Shepard * Anita Shreve * Jane Smiley * Martha Southgate * Cheryl Strayed * Evelyn Toynton * Lily Tuck * Edmund White

Elizabeth Benedict is the author of five novels, including the bestseller Almost and the National Book Award-shortlisted Slow Dancing, and The Joy of Writing Sex: A Guide for Fiction Writers. She has been a frequent guest on such national programs as NPR’s Fresh Air and All Things Considered, and her work has appeared in outlets including The New York Times, Boston Globe, AARP, Huffington Post, Allure, Esquire, Harper’s Bazaar, Tin House, and Salmagundi. Benedict is currently on the faculty of the Columbia University MFA program and has taught writing at Princeton, the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, and Swarthmore College. She lives in New York City and Boston.

Kathleen Stephenson hosts.
 

Author Matthew Flaming on "The Kingdom of Ohio," a speculative of science in 1900

Categories:
program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 02/25/2010

Host Ed Goldberg interviews local writer Matthew Flaming, author of  The Kingdom of Ohio, a speculative about science in 1900.   "The Kingdom of Ohio" is a love story set against New York City at the dawn of the mechanical age, featuring Nikola Tesla, Thomas Edison, and J. P. Morgan."  After discovering an old photograph, an elderly antiques dealer living in present-day Los Angeles is forced to revisit the history he has struggled to deny. The photograph depicts a man and a woman. The man is Peter Force, a young frontier adventurer who comes to New York City in 1901 and quickly lands a job digging the first subway tunnels beneath the metropolis. The woman is Cheri- Anne Toledo, a beautiful mathematical prodigy whose memories appear to come from another world. They meet seemingly by chance, and initially Peter dismisses her as crazy. But as they are drawn into a tangle of overlapping intrigues, Peter must reexamine Cheri-Anne’s fantastic story. Could it be that she is telling the truth and that she has stumbled onto the most dangerous secret imaginable: the key to traveling through time?  Set against the mazelike streets of New York at the dawn of the mechanical age, Peter and Cheri-Anne find themselves wrestling with the nature of history, technology, and the unfolding of time itself.

Comments

Timber Beasts

I've read the book twice and rather hoped to hear the program that the author spoke on the book. But that page was not available on your site. Anyway, I loved the book. I thought it was an exciting dose of history. Stoner brought the Portland of  1900 to life. There was intrigue that kept my interest throughout the book.

Today's Interview

I was washing eggs at the farm when this came on. I loved it and looked for it to share with my peeps!

 

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