Between the Covers

A weekly show featuring interviews with locally and nationally known authors of both fiction and non-fiction.

Episode Archive

Joann and Arielle Eckstut on their book, The Secret Language of Color

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Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 12/12/2013 - 11:00am - 11:30am
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Joann and Arielle Eckstut on their book, The Secret Language of Color

Color experts Joann Eckstut and Arielle Eckstut talk about their new book, The Secret Language of Color: Science, Nature, History, Culture, Beauty of Red, Orange, Yellow, Green, Blue, and Violet with host Kathleen Stephenson.

Christopher Lord on The Edwin Drood Murders

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Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 12/05/2013 - 11:00am - 11:30am
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Christopher Lord on The Edwin Drood Murders

Host Dan Johnson interviews Christopher Lord about his book, The Edwin Drood Murders, the second volume in the Dickens Junction mystery series that began with The Christmas Carol Murders, a book bestselling thriller writer Chelsea Cain called “a love letter to both Dickens and to the small town amateur detectives who’ve kept the peace in hamlets from River Heights to Cabot Cove.”

Christoper Lord was born in Astoria, Oregon. He now lives in Portland with his partner of twenty years and their Devon Rex, Miss Corey, the inspiration for Simon’s Miss Tox. He is hard at work on future books in the Dickens Junction mystery series.

Margaret Atwood on her latest novel Maddaddam

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Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 11/28/2013 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Margaret Atwood on her latest novel Maddaddam

Margaret Atwood discusses her latest novel, "Maddaddam," third in her speculative fiction trilogy that began with "Oryx and Crake," as well as the social and political ramifications of her work, with host Richard Wolinsky from the Series BookWaves.

This Is Between Us by Kevin Sampsell

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Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 11/21/2013 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
This Is Between Us by Kevin Sampsell
Host David Naimon speaks with an integral part of Portland's literary community--author Kevin Sampsell.   Kevin is not only the small press curator and events coordinator at Powell’s books, he's also the editor of the Portland Noir fiction anthology,  curated this year’s Wordstock literary festival,  was in charge of LitHopPDX, Portland’s inaugural literary bar crawl, and is the publisher of the micro-press Future Tense Books.   His own books include the collections Beautiful Blemish and Creamy Bullets, and his memoir A Common Pornography.  His work has appeared in Tin House, Salon, McSweeney’s,  Best Sex Writing 2012 and Best American Essays 2013, and he is here today on Between The Covers t

Local author Rayner Ward on his novel "Advent"

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 11/14/2013 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Local author Rayner Ward on his novel "Advent"

The guest is local author Rayner Ward, who discusses his new picaresque novel "Advent." "Advent" is a novel that is based on fact, spanning the decades from the 40's through the 60's in the life of Joe Kemp, an adventurous young Texan instrumental in creating and expanding the psychedelic drug revolution. Joe is an anti-hero, searcher and artist who explores a  variety of spiritual practices. While seeking enlightenment, Joe undergoes a process described in India as "the madness of God" and witnesses the dissolution of his own personality and the possibility of regeneration.

Portland writer Rob Yardumian discusses his debut novel, The Sound of Songs Across the Water

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 11/07/2013 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Portland writer, Rob Yardumian

Portland writer Rob Yardumian discusses his debut novel, The Sound of Songs Across the Water, and the accompanying music CD, Sing With Me, Brother, For We Have Sinned.

"It’s the summer of 1995, and in the hills above Los Angeles, Riley Oliver is ringing a doorbell and chasing a dream.  Fifteen years have passed since his band flamed out at CBGB, and Riley sees the life his former guitarist Will Taylor has built—successful producing career, the lovely Lena for a wife, a gated home—and he wants some of that luck for himself. Jumping the fence, Riley brings the shadows of the past back to Will, and long-buried conflicts darken the sunny Southern California scene. 

One Hundred Apocalypses and Other Apocalypses by Lucy Corin

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Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 10/31/2013 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
One Hundred Apocalypses and Other Apocalypses by Lucy Corin
Lucy Corin’s dazzling new collection is powered by one hundred apocalypses: a series of short stories that illuminate moments of vexation and crisis, revelations and revolutions. An apocalypse might come in the form of the end of a relationship or the end of the world, but what it exposes is the tricky landscape of our longing for a clean slate. David Naimon hosts. "Unforgettable voices resist description. Lucy Corin sounds like no one; prickly, shrewd, faintly paranoid or furtive, witty and also savage, she has something of Paley's gift for soliloquy combined with Dickinson's passionate need to hold the world at bay, that sense of a voice emanating from a Skinner box.

Oregon author Steve McQuiddy on "Here on the Edge" - Pacifism in World War II

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 10/24/2013 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
A look at the role of pacifism in World War II and one Oregon conscientous objector camp
Steve McQuiddy talks about his new book, "Here on the Edge", published by Oregon State University. McQuiddy looks at a long-neglected element of World War II history: the role of pacifism in what is often called "The Good War." He shares the fascinating story of one conscientious objector camp located on the rain-soaked Oregon Coast, Civilian Public Service (CPS) Camp #56, providing the definitive history of the Fine Arts Group at Waldport. Steve McQuiddy writes and lectures on Pacific Northwest history and culture, particularly the eccentric quarter. His monograph, The Fantastic Tale of Opal Whiteley, has been widely cited and reprinted, with an expanded version published in 2012.

Men We Reaped

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 10/17/2013 - 11:30am - 12:00pm
Short Description: 
Writer Jesmyn Ward on her Memoir Men We Reaped
Between the Covers, Part 2 Host Lisa Loving interviews writer Jesmyn Ward, about her new memoir "Men We Reaped." Jesmyn Ward grew up in poverty with a family struggling to stay together and survive in the rural South. All around her were black men facing dangers and social ills that are usually only talked about in the context of inner cities. As the sole member of her family to leave home, Jesmyn Ward discusses the place she came from with objectivity, but also with the intimacy of familiarity. Jesmyn Ward received her M.F.A from the University of Michigan and has been a Stegner Fellow at Stanford and a Grisham Visiting Writer in Residence at the University of Mississippi. She is currently an assistant professor of creative writing at the University of South Alabama.

Western mystery writer Craig Johnson on Spirit of Steamboat and more

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 10/17/2013 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Craig Johnson talks about his life, his work and his new novella Spirit of Steamboat
Host Gene Bradley interviews mystery writer Craig Johnson about his new Sheriff Longmire novella, SPIRIT OF STEAMBOAT. The action in Spirit of Steamboat begins when Sheriff Walt Longmire has an unexpected visitor on Christmas Eve. The visitor is the ghost of Christmas past: a young woman with a hairline scar across her forehead and more than a few questions about Walt’s predecessor, Lucian Connally. Craig Johnson is the New York Times bestselling author of the Walt Longmire mystery series.

Audio

PDX author Ann Littlewood on her 2nd 'zoo-dunnit:' "Did Not Survive"

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Between the Covers
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Thu, 08/05/2010

Host Ed Goldberg speaks with Portland author Ann Littlewood about her second "zoo-dunnit", "Did Not Survive," published by Poisoned Pen Press. The mystery continues where "Night Kill" left off. Now-pregnant zoo keeper Iris Oakley finds her boss gravely injured in an elephant stall. She suspects something more sinister than a rogue elephant. Animal rights activists are picketing the zoo, animals are disappearing, and staff are acting strangely. Then it gets worse.
The passionate issues around captive elephant management are woven throughout this traditional mystery set in fictional Finley Memorial Zoo in Vancouver, Washington. 

Ann Littlewood readings:
August 6 Friday 5-9 PM and August 7 Saturday 10 AM to 2 PM Art in the Heart, Vancouver, WA.
August 21 Saturday Northwest Author Fair, Lincoln City, OR, noon to 3 PM.

Caroline Miller on "Heart Land" and Gothic Spring"

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Between the Covers
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Thu, 07/29/2010

Host Ed Goldberg speaks with Portland writer Caroline Miller, author of "Heart Land," stories of Depression-Era Ohio and "Gothic Spring," a novel of passion and bad behavior in rural 19th Century England.

Caroline Miller has published numerous short stories in publications as diverse as Children’s Digest, Grit and Tales of the Talisman. Her short story, “Under the Bridge and Beneath the Moon,’ was dramatized for radio in Oregon and Washington. Her novel, Heart Land was published in 2009 by Schiel & Denver, and Gothic Spring was also published in 2009 by Asylett press.

Caroline is also a silk painter whose pieces have been sold in local galleries in the Portland area. Her art work has also been included in a number of juried exhibits. She taught English at both the high school and university levels, headed a Labor union for five years and successfully ran for public office three times. She holds a B.A. and M.A.T. degree from Reed College and an M.A. in Literature from Northern Arizona University where she graduated with honors. Ms. Miller lived for two years in England and two years in what is now called Zimbabwe.

  • Length: 26:56 minutes (24.66 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Thomas Chatterton Williams on "LOSING MY COOL: How a Father's Love and 15,000 Books Beat Hip-Hop Culture "

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Between the Covers
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Thu, 07/15/2010
Host Cecil Prescod speaks with Thomas Chatterton Williams about his memoir, LOSING MY COOL: How a Father's Love and 15,000 Books Beat Hip-Hop Culture. In the book Williams describes how he managed to juggle two disparate lifestyles--"keeping it real" in his friends' eyes and studying for the SATs under his father's strict tutelage. Pappy grew up in the segregated South and hid in closets so he could read Aesop and Plato. He envisioned for his son a lot in life greater than his own, and encouraged Williams to read and educate himself, and to embrace the opportunities that had not been available to Pappy's generation. As college approached and the stakes of the thug lifestyle escalated, the disparity between Williams' street life and home life threatened to undo him. Ultimately, Williams would have to decide between hip-hop and his future.
Thomas Chatterton Williams holds a Bachelor’s degree in philosophy from Georgetown University and a Master’s degree from the Cultural Reporting and Criticism program at New York University. In 2007, he wrote an op-ed piece entitled “Yes, Blame Hip-Hop” for the Washington Post which generated a record-breaking number of comments. He writes for the literary magazine n+1 and currently lives in Brooklyn.
 

Novelist Lauie Notaro on her "Spooky Little Girl"

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Between the Covers
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Thu, 07/08/2010

 

Host Ed Goldberg interviews Lauie Notaro, author of Spooky Little Girl, a funny novel about a woman whose life changes after she is killed by a bus.

Laurie Notaro was born in Brooklyn, New York, and raised in Phoenix, Arizona. She packed her bags for Eugene, Oregon, once she realized that since she was past thirty, her mother could no longer report her as a teenage runaway. She is the author of The Idiot Girls’ Action-Adventure Club, Autobiography of a Fat Bride, I Love Everybody, We Thought You’d Be Prettier, and An Idiot Girl’s Christmas.

Diane Hammond on "Seeing Stars," her novel on child actors in Hollywood

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Between the Covers
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Thu, 07/01/2010

 Host Ed Goldberg interviews Pacific Northwest writer Diane Hammond, author of Going to Bend, Homesick Creek, and Hannah's Dream. She talks about her latest book Seeing Stars, a novel about child actors in Hollywood with talent managers, agents, coaches, directors and teachers who nurture—and feed on—their ambitions.    

http://www.dianehammond.com/stars_chapter1.html 

The Battle for Gotham: New York in the Shadow of Robert Moses and Jane Jacobs

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Between the Covers
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Thu, 06/24/2010

Host Bruce Silverman speaks with Roberta Gratz, author of "The Battle for Gotham: New York in the Shadow of Robert Moses and Jane Jacobs." Urban critic and journalist Roberta Brandes Gratz argues that New York City regenerated itself because of the waning power of Robert Moses. His decline in the late 1960s and the drying up of big government funding for urban renewal projects allowed New York to organically regenerate according to the precepts defined by Jane Jacobs in her classic, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, and in contradiction to Moses's urban philosophy.

  • Length: 28:26 minutes (26.04 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Biographer Jimmy McDonough on "Tammy Wynette: Tragic Country Queen"

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Between the Covers
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Thu, 06/17/2010

  Host Ed Goldberg speaks with Jimmy McDonough, author of Tammy Wynette: Tragic Country Queen, a biography of the country music diva.

Jimmy McDonough’s biography of Neil Young, Shakey, was a critically acclaimed New York Times bestseller. He has also written biographies of Russ Meyer and Andy Milligan, and has written for publications including The Village Voice and Variety. He lives in Portland.

 

 Glen David Gold on his new novel "Sunnyside"

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Between the Covers
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Thu, 05/27/2010
Host Ed Goldberg interviews Glen David Gold, author of Sunnyside, a historical novel set during World War I. It features Charlie Chaplin and Rin Tin Tin.   Glen David Gold is the author of the best seller Carter Beats the Devil

Novelist Katie Arnoldi on "Point Dume," a tale of pot farms, surf culture and risk

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Between the Covers
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Thu, 05/20/2010
Katie Arnoldi, bestselling author of Chemical Pink and The Wentworths, talks about her latest novel, POINT DUME, a timely tale of pot farms, surf culture and risk.  Hosted by Lisa Loving.

Author Bill Morgan on "The Typewriter is Holy: The Complete Uncensored History of the Beat Generation"

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Between the Covers
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Thu, 05/13/2010

Kathleen Stephenson speaks with guest Bill Morgan, author of The Typewriter is Holy: The Complete Uncensored History of the Beat Generation, which explores the enduring revolutionary appeal of Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg, and WilliamS. Burroughs and brings to light lesser known Beat artists like Alan Ansen and Joanne Kyger. Morgan is the author and editor of more than a dozen books about the Beat writers. 

Comments

Timber Beasts

I've read the book twice and rather hoped to hear the program that the author spoke on the book. But that page was not available on your site. Anyway, I loved the book. I thought it was an exciting dose of history. Stoner brought the Portland of  1900 to life. There was intrigue that kept my interest throughout the book.

Today's Interview

I was washing eggs at the farm when this came on. I loved it and looked for it to share with my peeps!

 

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