Between the Covers

A weekly show featuring interviews with locally and nationally known authors of both fiction and non-fiction.

Episode Archive

Information Doesn't Want to Be Free: Cory Doctorow on Art, Copyright, and the Internet

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 11/20/2014 - 11:00am - 11:45am
Short Description: 
Information Doesn't Want to Be Free: Cory Doctorow on Art, Copyright, and the Internet

Host Ken Jones talks with Cory Doctorow, science fiction author, activist, journalist and blogger -- the co-editor of Boing Boing (boingboing.net) and the author of the recently published YA graphic novel In Real Life and the nonfiction book Information Doesn't Want to Be Free: Laws for the Internet Age. He has also published the young adult novels Homeland, Pirate Cinema, and Little Brother, and the novels for adults Rapture of the Nerds and Makers.

Citizen: An American Lyric by Claudia Rankine

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 11/13/2014 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Citizen: An American Lyric by Claudia Rankine

Claudia Rankine, chancellor of the Academy of American Poets, speaks about her much awaited follow-up to her groundbreaking work Don't Let Me Be Lonely.   A provocative meditation on race, Citizen: An American Lyric recounts mounting racial aggressions in ongoing encounters in twenty-first-century daily life and in the media. Some of these encounters are slights, seeming slips of the tongue, and some are intentional offensives in the classroom, at the supermarket, at home, on the tennis court with Serena Williams and the soccer field with Zinedine Zidane, online, on TV—everywhere, all the time. The accumulative stresses come to bear on a person’s ability to speak, perform, and stay alive.

The Peripheral by William Gibson

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 11/06/2014 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
The Peripheral by William Gibson

Where Flynne and her brother, Burton, live, jobs outside the drug business are rare. Fortunately, Burton has his veteran’s benefits, for neural damage he suffered from implants during his time in the USMC’s elite Haptic Recon force. Then one night Burton has to go out, but there’s a job he’s supposed to do—a job Flynne didn’t know he had. Beta-testing part of a new game, he tells her. The job seems to be simple: work a perimeter around the image of a tower building. Little buglike things turn up. He’s supposed to get in their way, edge them back. That’s all there is to it. He’s offering Flynne a good price to take over for him. What she sees, though, isn’t what Burton told her to expect.

Roberto Trotta, The Edge of the Sky: All You Need to Know About the All There Is (Book Giveaway!)

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 10/30/2014 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Roberto Trotta, The Edge of the Sky

Roberto Trotta, a theoretical cosmologist and lecturer in astrophysics at Imperial College, London, is the author of the new book, "The Edge of the Sky: All You Need to Know About the All There Is".   KBOO will give away a copy of the book during this broadcast!

Roberta Trotta deconstructs the Universe, using only the 1000 most common words in the English Language, in 85 pages.  The result is not only illuminating, but pure poetry.  Planets become crazy stars, galaxies are star crowds, The Milky Way is the white road, and Earth is the home world.

Richard Powers on his novel "Orfeo"

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 10/23/2014 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Richard Powers on his novel "Orfeo"
National Book Award winner Richard Powers discusses his latest novel, "Orfeo," now out in trade paper, about modern music and the horrors of the national security state with host Richard Wolinskyl  

This program is from Bookwaves. An extended version of this interview can be found at www.bookwaves.com 

Alix Christie on her novel "Gutenberg's Apprentice"

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 10/16/2014 - 11:00am - 11:35am
Short Description: 
Alix Christie on her novel "Gutenberg's Apprentice"
Host Kathleen Stephenson speaks with journalist and author Alix Christie about her new novel GUTENBERG’S APPRENTICE. 
Alix tells the story of Gutenberg, his apprentice, and his team of typesetters as they worked on the first mass produced book, the Gutenberg Bible

Alix Christie is a journalist who when she very young was an apprentice at her family’s hot type foundry which still survives in San Francisco.  She owns and operates a 1910 Chandler and Price letterpress. She lives in London, where she reviews books and arts for the Economist. GUTENBERG'S APPRENTICE is her first novel.

Peyton Marshall on her new novel "Goodhouse"

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 10/09/2014 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Peyton Marshall on her new novel "Goodhouse"
We speak wiht Portland author Peyton Marshall about her debut novel GOODHOUSE. Marshall is a former member of an all-female punk band in the 90s.

Bone Clocks by David Mitchell

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 10/02/2014 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Bone Clocks by David Mitchell

Bone Clocks is the much anticipated, dazzling new novel from David Mitchell, the author of Cloud Atlas.  At once a metaphysical thriller, a meditation on mortality and a chronicle of our self-devouring times, this kaleidoscopic novel crackles with the invention and wit that have made David Mitchell one of the most celebrated writers of his generation. Here is fiction at its most spellbinding and memorable best.  Bone Clocks is a nominee for the 2014 Man Booker prize.

Kate Gray, Carry the Sky

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 09/25/2014 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Kate Gray, Carry the Sky. Debut novel by Portland-based poet & community college instructor

Between the Covers welcomes Portland-based poet Kate Gray to discuss her debut novel, Carry the Sky, published by local Forest Avenue Press.

Richard Flanagan on his latest novel "The Narrow Road to the Deep North"

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 09/18/2014 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Richard Flanagan on his latest novel "The Narrow Road to the Deep North"
Tasmanian writer Richard Flanagan discusses his latest novel, "The Narrow Road to the Deep North," short listed for the Mann Booker Prize, as well as his career, with host Richard Wolinsky.
"The Narrow Road to the Deep North" is set in 1943 in the despair of a Japanese POW camp on the Thai-Burma Death Railway, 

From the series "Bookwaves"

Audio

Junot Diaz on his new collection "This Is How You Lose Her"

Categories:
program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 09/27/2012

 Host David Naimon speaks with Junot Diaz, a writer The New Yorker calls one of the top 20 writers for the 21st century. He’s the Pulitzer Prize winning author of the novel, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, a creative writing professor at MIT, the fiction editor at The Boston Review, and a founding member of Voices of Our Nations Arts Writing Workshop, which focuses on writers of color. In 2010 he was the first Latino to be appointed to the board of jurors for the Pulitzer Prize. Junot Diaz is here today to talk about his new short story collection This is How you Lose her, a much-anticipated work, sixteen years in the making.

  • Length: 34:01 minutes (31.14 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Sheila Heti on her book How Should A Person Be?

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program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 08/16/2012

 Is How Should a Person Be? a novel, a memoir, a self-help manual, or a book of philosophy? It is all of these things and more. Host David Naimon talks with Sheila Heti about her new book, "a raw, startling, genre-defying novel of friends, sex, and love in the new millennium--a compulsive read that's like 'spending a day with your new best friend.' (Bookforum).

Canadian writer, Sheila Heti is the author of five books, all very different in form and style. She has written a collection of modern fables entitled The Middle Stories, a historical novella calledTicknor and an illustrated book for children, We Need a Horse. Recently she ventured into nonfiction with her book of “conversational philosophy,” The Chairs Are Where the People Go, written with Misha Glouberman, which the New Yorker chose as one of the best books of 2011. Sheila Heti also works as Interviews Editor at The Believer magazine.

  • Length: 27:59 minutes (25.62 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Writer Benjamin Busch on his new memoir Dust to Dust

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program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 08/02/2012

Host Jim Schumock speaks with Bejamin Busch about his new memoir Dust to Dust, which is about ordinary things: life and death, peace and war, the adventures of childhood and the revelations of adulthood. Benjamin Busch—a decorated U.S. Marine Corps infantry officer who served two combat tours in Iraq, an actor on The Wire, and the son of celebrated novelist Frederick Busch.

Benjamin Busch was born in Manhattan in 1968 and grew up in rural New York State. He is an actor, a photographer, a film director, and a U.S. Marine Corps infantry officer who served two combat tours in Iraq. He played the role of Officer Anthony Colicchio on the HBO series The Wire and has appeared on Homicide, The West Wing, and Generation Kill. His writing has been featured in Harper's and has been twice nominated for the Pushcart Prize.

  • Length: 23:32 minutes (10.77 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 64Kbps (CBR)

Novelist Ron Rash on his new book "The Cove," story of a blazing but doomed love affair in WWI

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program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 07/26/2012

Host Jim Schumock speaks with writer Ron Rash about his new book The Cove, a tale of the beauty of nature and love—and the darkness of superstition and fear. With The Cove, Rash, the author of Serena, returns to the Appalachian milieu of his previous novels. This is a story of a love affair doomed in the rising turmoil of WWI. At the same time The Cove explores often dangerous notions of patriotism during wartime.

Ron Rash is the author of three prize-winning novels: One Foot in Eden, Saints at the River, and The World Made Straight; three collections of poems; and two collections of stories. A recipient of the O. Henry Prize, he holds the John Parris Chair in Appalachian Studies at Western Carolina University.

  • Length: 28:11 minutes (12.9 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 64Kbps (CBR)

Karen Thompson Walker discusses her novel The Age of Miracles

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program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 07/19/2012

On a seemingly ordinary Saturday in a California suburb, Julia and her family awake to discover, along with the rest of the world, that the rotation of the earth has suddenly begun to slow. The days and nights grow longer and longer, gravity is affected, the environment is thrown into disarray. Yet as she struggles to navigate an ever-shifting landscape, Julia is also coping with the normal disasters of everyday life—the fissures in her parents’ marriage, the loss of old friends, the hopeful anguish of first love, the bizarre behavior of her grandfather who, convinced of a government conspiracy, spends his days obsessively cataloging his possessions. As Julia adjusts to the new normal, the slowing inexorably continues.

This is the world of The Age of Miracles by Karen Thompson Walker.  Host David Naimon talks with Karen about her debut novel which has taken the literary world by storm.

Zazen: An interview with Portland author Vanessa Veselka.

Categories:
program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 07/12/2012

A war has either started or is about to. Bombs are going off in the city. But people seem strangely disengaged. Della's activist friends seem more concerned about the next sex party or the finer points of vegan ideology, and customers at the vegan café where she works, talk of leaving the country for a life of escape and eco-tourism. But Della feels compelled to stay as the bombs inch closer. Even though she isn’t quite sure how to engage, and what exactly to fight for. This is the world of Zazen.

Today’s guest is Portland writer and debut novelist Vanessa Veselka. Vanessa’s work has appeared in Tin House, The Atlantic, BUST, Bitch Magazine, and Maximum Rock 'n' Roll, among others. She’s also a musician and a writing instructor at The Attic. She talks today with host David Naimon about her first book, Zazen, a finalist for the Oregon Book Awards, published by Red Lemonade Press.

  • Length: 29:05 minutes (26.63 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Interview with Mark Baumgarten, author of Love Rock Revolution: K Records and the Rise of Independent Music

program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Mon, 07/09/2012

Erin Yanke interviews Mark Baumgarten, author of the book Love Rock Revolution: K Records and the Rise of Independent Music. Mark will be reading in Portland July 12th, 7:30pm, at Powells Books on Burnside. The reading and book signing will be followed by a K Records tribute concert at Valentine's (9pm, $3, 21+) with Clea Partridge, Grey Anne, and others.

http://loverockrev.com/

Anne Mendel on her debut novel "Etiquette for an Apocalypse"

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program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 07/05/2012

Host Kathleen Stephenson speaks with Portland author Anne Mendel, who discusses her debut novel, Etiquette for an Apocalypse.

It’s the 2020 Apocalypse and Sophie Cohen, former social worker turned neighborly drug dealer, must keep her family alive amid those pesky end of the world issues: starvation, earthquakes, plagues, gang violence and alas more starvation.She investigates a serial killing and takes down the sinister emerging power structure while learning to use a pizza box solar oven, bond with her chickens and blast tin cans from the perimeter fence with a Ruger 9MM.

In order to accomplish all this she must find a way to love her mother, accept her daughter’s adulthood and reignite her moribund marriage.

Anne Mendel grew up in Arkansas and actually attended Miss Ashleigh’s Charm school. She learned nothing about dealing with disasters, (unless breaking a high heel is a disaster).

Before she began writing full time she was a community organizing advocate for women and girls.

  • Length: 26:27 minutes (24.21 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Stereo 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Writer BK Loren on her novel "Theft"

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program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 06/28/2012

Host Jay Thiemeyer speaks with writer BK Loren about her new novel "Theft," whose main character Willa Robbins is a master tracker working to reintroduce the Mexican wolf, North America’s most endangered mammal, to the American Southwest. But when Colorado police recruit her to find her own brother, Zeb, a confessed murderer, she knows skill alone will not sustain her. Willa is thrown back into the past, surfacing memories of a childhood full of intense love, desperate mistakes, and gentle remorse. "Theft" is a story about family, about loss, and about a search for answers.

BK LOREN has worked as a naturalist, large predator monitor for CO State Parks, professional brainstormer, assistant chef, ranch hand, furniture maker, UPS driver, and college professor. She currently teaches writing at Chatham University’s low residency program, the Iowa Summer Writing Festival, and many other venues throughout the United States and Canada.

  • Length: 26:50 minutes (24.57 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Writer Bonnie Jo Campbell on her new novel ONCE UPON A RIVER

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program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 06/21/2012

Bonnie Jo Campbell talks about her new book Once Upon a River, an odyssey of a novel about a girl's search for love and identity.

(Photo © Bradley S. Pines)

Bonnie Jo Campbell grew up on a small Michigan farm with her mother and four siblings in a house her grandfather Herlihy built in the shape of an H. She learned to castrate small pigs, milk Jersey cows, and, when she was snowed in with chocolate, butter, and vanilla, to make remarkable chocolate candy. When she left home for the University of Chicago to study philosophy, her mother rented out her room. She has since hitchhiked across the U.S. and Canada, scaled the Swiss alps on her bicycle, and traveled with the Ringling Bros and Barnum & Bailey Circus selling snow cones. As president of Goulash Tours Inc., she has organized and led adventure tours in Russia and the Baltics, and all the way south to Romania and Bulgaria.

Her collection details the lives of extraordinary females in rural and small town Michigan, and it won the AWP prize for short fiction; her story "The Smallest Man in the World" has been awarded a Pushcart Prize. Her novel Q Road investigates the lives of a rural community where development pressures are bringing unwelcome change in the character of the land. Her critically-acclaimed short fiction collection American Salvage, which consists of fourteen lush and rowdy stories of folks who are struggling to make sense of the twenty-first century, was a finalist for the 2009 National Book Award in Fiction.

  • Length: 25:39 minutes (23.48 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Comments

Timber Beasts

I've read the book twice and rather hoped to hear the program that the author spoke on the book. But that page was not available on your site. Anyway, I loved the book. I thought it was an exciting dose of history. Stoner brought the Portland of  1900 to life. There was intrigue that kept my interest throughout the book.

Today's Interview

I was washing eggs at the farm when this came on. I loved it and looked for it to share with my peeps!

 

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