Between the Covers

A weekly show featuring interviews with locally and nationally known authors of both fiction and non-fiction.

Coming Soon

The Dying Grass by William T. Vollmann
Baby's On Fire by Liz Prato
Steering the Craft: A Twenty-First-Century Guide to Sailing the Sea of Story by Ursula K. Le Guin
 

Episode Archive

Parnaz Foroutan on her debut novel "The Girl from the Garden"

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 08/27/2015 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Parnaz Foroutan on her debut novel "The Girl from the Garden"
Host Sarika Mehta speaks with Parnaz Foroutan, author of the debut novel THE GIRL FROM THE GARDEN, which was longlisted for the Center for Fiction First Novel Prize and named a 2015 selection for the prestigious Indies Introduce Debut Authors program,

Foroutan brings to life the tumult of early 20th century Iran and the complex, tragic history of a wealthy family of Persian Jews. This is an intimate view of a young woman bound by the confines of an oppressive male-dominated society, and of the crisis of inheritance that drives her to dark extremes to save herself and preserve her status within the family.

A Long High Whistle by David Biespiel

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 08/20/2015 - 11:00am - 12:00pm
Short Description: 
A Long High Whistle by David Biespiel

Over the course of ten years, poet and critic David Biespiel published an essay on poetry every month in the Oregonian in what became the longest-running newspaper column on poetry in the United States. Collected for the first time, these enormously popular essays, many of which have been revised and expanded, offer a fresh and refreshing approach to the reading and writing of poetry. With passion, wit, and common sense, they articulate a profound and entertaining statement about the mysteries of poetry and about poetry's essential role in our civic and cultural lives.

Portland Author Ellen Urbani launches Hurricane Katrina-inspired novel, Landfall.

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 08/13/2015 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Ellen Urbani, author of Landfall

Between the Covers welcomes local author Ellen Urbani on the launch of her debut novel, Landfall, published by Portland-based national publisher Forest Avenue Press.

Music for Wartime by Rebecca Makkai

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 08/06/2015 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Music for Wartime by Rebecca Makkai

The award-winning writer, Rebecca Makkai, whose stories have appeared in four consecutive editions of The Best American Short Stories, appears on Between The Covers to discuss her much-anticipated story collection bearing her signature mix of intelligence, wit, and heart. A reality show producer manipulates two contestants into falling in love, even as her own relationship falls apart. Just after the fall of the Berlin Wall, a young boy has a revelation about his father’s past when a renowned Romanian violinist plays a concert in their home. When the prized elephant of a traveling circus keels over dead, the small-town minister tasked with burying its remains comes to question his own faith.

The Argonauts by Maggie Nelson

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 07/30/2015 - 11:00am - 12:00pm
Short Description: 
The Argonauts by Maggie Nelson

Maggie Nelson's The Argonauts is a genre-bending memoir offering fresh, fierce, and timely thinking about desire, identity, and the limitations and possibilities of love and language. At its center is a romance: the story of the author's relationship with the fluidly-gendered artist Harry Dodge, offering a firsthand account of the complexities and joys of (queer) family-making.

Jeff Koehler on his book, "Darjeeling," the Story of How Darjeeling Tea Began

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 07/23/2015 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Jeff Koehler on his book, "Darjeeling," the Story of How Darjeeling Tea Began

The guest is Jeff Koehler, author of "Darjeeling," the story of how Darjeeling tea began, jump-started the largest tea industry on the globe under imperial British rule, and came to produce the highest-quality tea leaves anywhere in the world – beloved by millions. It is a story rich in people, history, intrigue, and terroir, all set amidst a backdrop of the looming Himalayas and drenching monsoons. But it is also the story of how the industry spiraled into decline by the end of the 20th century, and how this Edenic spot in the high Himalayas seethes with a violent independence struggle.

Jeff Koehler speaks Thursday the 23rd, at 7:30pm  /  Powell's City of Books .
 

The Small Backs of Children by Lidia Yuknavitch

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 07/16/2015 - 11:00am - 11:50am
Short Description: 
The Small Backs of Children by Lidia Yuknavitch

Walidah Imarisha, Octavia's Brood: Science Fiction Stories from Social Justice Movements

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 07/09/2015 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Walidah Imarisha, Octavia's Brood: Sci-Fi Stories from Social Justice Movements

Between the Covers welcomes Walidah Imarisha, co-editor and contributing author of Octavia's Brood:  Science Fiction Stories from Social Justice Movements.

Portland writer Justin Hocking on his Memoir, "The Great Floodgates of the Wonderworld"

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 07/02/2015 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Portland writer Justin Hocking on his Memoir, "The Great Floodgates of the Wonderworld"

Host Jay Thiemeyer speaks with Portland writer Justin Hocking about his book, The Great Floodgates of the Wonderworld, Winner of the 2015 Oregon Book Award for Creative Nonfiction.

Polly Dugan on her new novel "The Sweetheart Deal"

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 06/25/2015 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Polly Dugan on her new novel "The Sweetheart Deal"

Host Kathleen Stephenson speaks with Portland writer Polly Dugan about her new novel, The Sweetheart Deal,  It's the story of what happens when a woman who thinks she's lost everything has the chance to love again.  

Polly Dugan s a reader at Tin House magazine. A former employee of Powell's Books, she is an alumna of the Tin House Writer's Workshop. Dugan's first published story, "A Matter of Time," was Line Zero's Spring 2012 Literary Contest Winner, "Masquerades" (as "One At a Time"), was Narrative's Story of the Week (December 2012), and "Kitten Season" was an Honorable Mention Recipient in Glimmer Train's Short Story Award for New Writers (August 2009).

Audio

Junot Diaz on his new collection "This Is How You Lose Her"

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program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 09/27/2012

 Host David Naimon speaks with Junot Diaz, a writer The New Yorker calls one of the top 20 writers for the 21st century. He’s the Pulitzer Prize winning author of the novel, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, a creative writing professor at MIT, the fiction editor at The Boston Review, and a founding member of Voices of Our Nations Arts Writing Workshop, which focuses on writers of color. In 2010 he was the first Latino to be appointed to the board of jurors for the Pulitzer Prize. Junot Diaz is here today to talk about his new short story collection This is How you Lose her, a much-anticipated work, sixteen years in the making.

  • Length: 34:01 minutes (31.14 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Sheila Heti on her book How Should A Person Be?

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program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 08/16/2012

 Is How Should a Person Be? a novel, a memoir, a self-help manual, or a book of philosophy? It is all of these things and more. Host David Naimon talks with Sheila Heti about her new book, "a raw, startling, genre-defying novel of friends, sex, and love in the new millennium--a compulsive read that's like 'spending a day with your new best friend.' (Bookforum).

Canadian writer, Sheila Heti is the author of five books, all very different in form and style. She has written a collection of modern fables entitled The Middle Stories, a historical novella calledTicknor and an illustrated book for children, We Need a Horse. Recently she ventured into nonfiction with her book of “conversational philosophy,” The Chairs Are Where the People Go, written with Misha Glouberman, which the New Yorker chose as one of the best books of 2011. Sheila Heti also works as Interviews Editor at The Believer magazine.

  • Length: 27:59 minutes (25.62 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Writer Benjamin Busch on his new memoir Dust to Dust

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program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 08/02/2012

Host Jim Schumock speaks with Bejamin Busch about his new memoir Dust to Dust, which is about ordinary things: life and death, peace and war, the adventures of childhood and the revelations of adulthood. Benjamin Busch—a decorated U.S. Marine Corps infantry officer who served two combat tours in Iraq, an actor on The Wire, and the son of celebrated novelist Frederick Busch.

Benjamin Busch was born in Manhattan in 1968 and grew up in rural New York State. He is an actor, a photographer, a film director, and a U.S. Marine Corps infantry officer who served two combat tours in Iraq. He played the role of Officer Anthony Colicchio on the HBO series The Wire and has appeared on Homicide, The West Wing, and Generation Kill. His writing has been featured in Harper's and has been twice nominated for the Pushcart Prize.

  • Length: 23:32 minutes (10.77 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 64Kbps (CBR)

Novelist Ron Rash on his new book "The Cove," story of a blazing but doomed love affair in WWI

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program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 07/26/2012

Host Jim Schumock speaks with writer Ron Rash about his new book The Cove, a tale of the beauty of nature and love—and the darkness of superstition and fear. With The Cove, Rash, the author of Serena, returns to the Appalachian milieu of his previous novels. This is a story of a love affair doomed in the rising turmoil of WWI. At the same time The Cove explores often dangerous notions of patriotism during wartime.

Ron Rash is the author of three prize-winning novels: One Foot in Eden, Saints at the River, and The World Made Straight; three collections of poems; and two collections of stories. A recipient of the O. Henry Prize, he holds the John Parris Chair in Appalachian Studies at Western Carolina University.

  • Length: 28:11 minutes (12.9 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 64Kbps (CBR)

Karen Thompson Walker discusses her novel The Age of Miracles

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program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 07/19/2012

On a seemingly ordinary Saturday in a California suburb, Julia and her family awake to discover, along with the rest of the world, that the rotation of the earth has suddenly begun to slow. The days and nights grow longer and longer, gravity is affected, the environment is thrown into disarray. Yet as she struggles to navigate an ever-shifting landscape, Julia is also coping with the normal disasters of everyday life—the fissures in her parents’ marriage, the loss of old friends, the hopeful anguish of first love, the bizarre behavior of her grandfather who, convinced of a government conspiracy, spends his days obsessively cataloging his possessions. As Julia adjusts to the new normal, the slowing inexorably continues.

This is the world of The Age of Miracles by Karen Thompson Walker.  Host David Naimon talks with Karen about her debut novel which has taken the literary world by storm.

Zazen: An interview with Portland author Vanessa Veselka.

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program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 07/12/2012

A war has either started or is about to. Bombs are going off in the city. But people seem strangely disengaged. Della's activist friends seem more concerned about the next sex party or the finer points of vegan ideology, and customers at the vegan café where she works, talk of leaving the country for a life of escape and eco-tourism. But Della feels compelled to stay as the bombs inch closer. Even though she isn’t quite sure how to engage, and what exactly to fight for. This is the world of Zazen.

Today’s guest is Portland writer and debut novelist Vanessa Veselka. Vanessa’s work has appeared in Tin House, The Atlantic, BUST, Bitch Magazine, and Maximum Rock 'n' Roll, among others. She’s also a musician and a writing instructor at The Attic. She talks today with host David Naimon about her first book, Zazen, a finalist for the Oregon Book Awards, published by Red Lemonade Press.

  • Length: 29:05 minutes (26.63 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Interview with Mark Baumgarten, author of Love Rock Revolution: K Records and the Rise of Independent Music

program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Mon, 07/09/2012

Erin Yanke interviews Mark Baumgarten, author of the book Love Rock Revolution: K Records and the Rise of Independent Music. Mark will be reading in Portland July 12th, 7:30pm, at Powells Books on Burnside. The reading and book signing will be followed by a K Records tribute concert at Valentine's (9pm, $3, 21+) with Clea Partridge, Grey Anne, and others.

http://loverockrev.com/

Anne Mendel on her debut novel "Etiquette for an Apocalypse"

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program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 07/05/2012

Host Kathleen Stephenson speaks with Portland author Anne Mendel, who discusses her debut novel, Etiquette for an Apocalypse.

It’s the 2020 Apocalypse and Sophie Cohen, former social worker turned neighborly drug dealer, must keep her family alive amid those pesky end of the world issues: starvation, earthquakes, plagues, gang violence and alas more starvation.She investigates a serial killing and takes down the sinister emerging power structure while learning to use a pizza box solar oven, bond with her chickens and blast tin cans from the perimeter fence with a Ruger 9MM.

In order to accomplish all this she must find a way to love her mother, accept her daughter’s adulthood and reignite her moribund marriage.

Anne Mendel grew up in Arkansas and actually attended Miss Ashleigh’s Charm school. She learned nothing about dealing with disasters, (unless breaking a high heel is a disaster).

Before she began writing full time she was a community organizing advocate for women and girls.

  • Length: 26:27 minutes (24.21 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Stereo 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Writer BK Loren on her novel "Theft"

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program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 06/28/2012

Host Jay Thiemeyer speaks with writer BK Loren about her new novel "Theft," whose main character Willa Robbins is a master tracker working to reintroduce the Mexican wolf, North America’s most endangered mammal, to the American Southwest. But when Colorado police recruit her to find her own brother, Zeb, a confessed murderer, she knows skill alone will not sustain her. Willa is thrown back into the past, surfacing memories of a childhood full of intense love, desperate mistakes, and gentle remorse. "Theft" is a story about family, about loss, and about a search for answers.

BK LOREN has worked as a naturalist, large predator monitor for CO State Parks, professional brainstormer, assistant chef, ranch hand, furniture maker, UPS driver, and college professor. She currently teaches writing at Chatham University’s low residency program, the Iowa Summer Writing Festival, and many other venues throughout the United States and Canada.

  • Length: 26:50 minutes (24.57 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Writer Bonnie Jo Campbell on her new novel ONCE UPON A RIVER

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program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 06/21/2012

Bonnie Jo Campbell talks about her new book Once Upon a River, an odyssey of a novel about a girl's search for love and identity.

(Photo © Bradley S. Pines)

Bonnie Jo Campbell grew up on a small Michigan farm with her mother and four siblings in a house her grandfather Herlihy built in the shape of an H. She learned to castrate small pigs, milk Jersey cows, and, when she was snowed in with chocolate, butter, and vanilla, to make remarkable chocolate candy. When she left home for the University of Chicago to study philosophy, her mother rented out her room. She has since hitchhiked across the U.S. and Canada, scaled the Swiss alps on her bicycle, and traveled with the Ringling Bros and Barnum & Bailey Circus selling snow cones. As president of Goulash Tours Inc., she has organized and led adventure tours in Russia and the Baltics, and all the way south to Romania and Bulgaria.

Her collection details the lives of extraordinary females in rural and small town Michigan, and it won the AWP prize for short fiction; her story "The Smallest Man in the World" has been awarded a Pushcart Prize. Her novel Q Road investigates the lives of a rural community where development pressures are bringing unwelcome change in the character of the land. Her critically-acclaimed short fiction collection American Salvage, which consists of fourteen lush and rowdy stories of folks who are struggling to make sense of the twenty-first century, was a finalist for the 2009 National Book Award in Fiction.

  • Length: 25:39 minutes (23.48 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Comments

Timber Beasts

I've read the book twice and rather hoped to hear the program that the author spoke on the book. But that page was not available on your site. Anyway, I loved the book. I thought it was an exciting dose of history. Stoner brought the Portland of  1900 to life. There was intrigue that kept my interest throughout the book.

Today's Interview

I was washing eggs at the farm when this came on. I loved it and looked for it to share with my peeps!

 

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