Audio by album locus_focus

Sustainable Food Policy and Practice

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 09/21/2009

Thirty years ago Portland was ringed by working farms and the community garden program was beginning to blossom. Today community gardens are still alive and well throughout Portland, but much of the old farms at the edge of town are now covered with housing and commercial development. On this segment of Locus Focus, host Barbara Bernstein talks with Mayor Sam Adams, Zenger Farm's Jill Kuehler and Clare Carver with Big Table Farm in Gaston, about why we need to protect local farms close to and inside our city. We look at the connections between land use policies that preserve small family farms and the growing movement to eat local food, and maybe even grow our own. Find out why eating and farming sustainably is a revolutionary act.

40:26 minutes (37.01 MB)

Real Climate Action

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 09/28/2009

 

 

 

 

The pressure is on for the United States to emerge from the dark ages of the Bush years and finally pass meaningful legislation to address the coming climate change crisis. So what is happening with the federal Climate Bill and will it have the teeth it needs. Host Barbara Bernstein talks with listeners about what should be in the climate bill and what it will take to get it passed.

 

39:14 minutes (35.92 MB)

Living Beyond the Barcode: Backyard Food Production & Preservation

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 10/05/2009
Program: 
Air date: 
Mon, 10/05/2009 - 10:15am - 11:00am
43:48 minutes (40.11 MB)

Friends of Family Farmers

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 10/19/2009
Eating locally has become a national movement. But how can we eat locally produced food if our nearby family farms are plowed under for subdivisions?

Eating locally has become a national movement. But how can we eat locally produced food if our nearby family farms are plowed under for subdivisions?

42:23 minutes (38.81 MB)

Portland's Urban Growth Boundary: Thirty Years Later

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 10/26/2009

In the late 1970s, an imaginary line was drawn around the Portland area. Inside the line, urban development could flourish. Outside that line the farms and forestland that characterize western Oregon would remain intact. This line, called the urban growth boundary, has saved much of the natural landscape that surrounds the city. But in the thirty years since the UGB was first drawn, it has expanded more than once. Now a lot of people in the region are saying it doesn't need to grow anymore.

54:16 minutes (49.68 MB)

CHASING MOLECULES

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 11/02/2009

How can green chemistry revolutionize the materials we make, how they're used, and the benefits to our health and the environment.

44:36 minutes (40.83 MB)

Farming Beyond the Barcode

program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 11/09/2009

Portland area farmer Clare Carver (Big Table Farm in Gaston) returns to Locus Focus for a chat with Joel Salatin, farmer, food choice advocate and dream-doer, who runs Polyface Farm in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia. We'll discuss the sustainable agricultural methods they practice, based on polyculture and the interweaving roles of farm animals and crops.

39:35 minutes (36.24 MB)

WHAT IS PLAN B 4.0

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program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 11/16/2009

Lester Brown, president of the Earth Policy Institute, has come out with a new book PLAN B 4.0: MOBILIZING TO SAVE CIVILIZATION. This plan for how we can (and must) cut global emissions by 80% by the year 2020, suggests existing technologies and know-how that will accomplish what political and industrial leaders around the world seem to find so daunting.

39:38 minutes (36.3 MB)

Cap & Trade 101

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 11/23/2009

Cap-and-trade systems are being touted across the country as the most likely way to reduce carbon emissions and they have been in practice in Europe for several years. But cap-and-trade is controversial in the eyes of some envrironmentalists—who see carbon trading as a form of 21st century indulgences—as well as industrial polluters who believe cap-and-trade creates unwanted government regulation.

42:48 minutes (39.18 MB)

Nuclear Power - Carbon-free Energy for the Future or Still Just a Bad Idea?

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 12/07/2009

A couple months ago, Locus Focus host Barbara Bernstein leaped at the opportunity to interview Stewart Brand, Whole Earth Catalog creator and innovative futurist. But Stewart has changed his views on some key things since the heady days of the late 1960s and early 70s, when his ideas and projects inspired a huge counter-cultural movement. His primary concern now is curbing climate change and he believes that to achieve the goal of drastically reducing our carbon emissions we must embrace technologies that he (and most of the environmental movement) once eschewed - like nuclear power.

41:53 minutes (38.34 MB)

Women and Climate Change

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 12/14/2009

Why do women hold the key to solving climate change? Guest Sarah Craven, chief of the United Nations Population Fund's Washington office, talks about how climate change is more than an issue of energy efficiency or industrial carbon emissions; it is also an issue of population dynamics, poverty and gender equity. 

On this show we'll look at how climate change impacts women and whether population growth is a major cause of climate change. What's the best way to protect humanity from extreme weather and rising seas? Could better access to reproductive health care and improved relations between women and men make a critical difference in addressing this long-term global problem?

40:35 minutes (37.16 MB)

A Householder's Holiday Guide to the Universe

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 12/21/2009

Harriet Fasenfest, writer, cook, gardener, food preserver and backyard economist, returns to Locus Focus to talk about the art, economics and politics of householding and food preservation just in time for the holidays.

Born and raised in the Bronx, Harriet Fasenfest has lived in the Northwest since 1978. Now retired from Main Street, she is attempting to raise the bones of home economics from the trash bin of modernity. She teaches classes on food preservation at Preserve and lives happily with her husband and children in Portland, Oregon.

56:20 minutes (51.57 MB)

CREATING A NEIGHBORHOOD SENSE OF PLACE - TABORSPACE

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 12/28/2009

Lauren Moomaw and Maggie Maggio are part of a new community effort, TaborSpace. This coffeehouse and gathering place feels like a throwback to the best of Portland in the 1970s, but it also reflects a uniquely 21st century understanding of how to create sustainable communities. This week on Locus Focus we talk with Lauren and Maggie about creating a neighborhood sense of place through village building.

43:00 minutes (39.37 MB)

What Happened in Copenhagen?

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 01/04/2010

Climate talks drew to a close in Copenhagen just before Christmas, with little concrete action to celebrate. Our guest Robert Engelman was there and he tells us what happened in Copenhagen, what didn't happen, what we can hope for and what we need to make sure happens soon.

45:34 minutes (41.72 MB)

What's Happening with Portland's Water?

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 01/11/2010

What's going on with Portland's water? In light of the Thanksgiving weekend e coli outbreak in one of the Washington Park Reservoirs, we look at arguments for and against covering Portland's famously open-air reservoirs. We also talk about the underground water storage facility under construction on Powell Butte and the status of Portland's request for a variance from the EPA for its open reservoirs.

Our guests are David Shaff with the Portland Water Bureau and Friends of the Reservoirs representatives Floy Jones and Scott Fernandez.

53:08 minutes (48.64 MB)

Mountaintop Removal Mining

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 01/18/2010

Many Portlander's think that we get most of our electricity from the Bonneville hydro system, but in fact 40% comes from burning coal, much of it mined by blasting the top off a mountain in Kirk, West Virginia. This week on Locus Focus, guest Judy Bonds, co-director for Coal River Mountain Watch, talks about the impact of this devastating practice on the lives, economy and culture of her community. We'll also hear an update on what's happening at the federal and local level to end mountain top removal mining and put a stop to the wholesale burying of streams under mountains of mine tailings.

45:02 minutes (41.23 MB)

A Pivotal Moment

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 01/25/2010

What does population growth have to do with climate change? We hear from what the connections are from Laurie Mazur, who has edited a new book called A Pivotal Moment: Population, Justice and the Environmental Challenge.

26:05 minutes (23.88 MB)

The Brooklyn Basin Project

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 02/01/2010

300 miles of creeks lie beneath streets and buildings of Portland. In this segment of Locus Focus we explore a creek that flows under the streets of SE Portland and what the city is doing to recognize and replicate the important functions that creek once performed. Brooklyn Creek's headwaters are on the west slope of Mt. Tabor (a dormant volcano that hovers on the near horizon of SE Portland). Until it was culverted many years ago, the creek flowed through what are now the Sunnyside, Richmond, Hosford, Abernathy and Brooklyn neighborhoods, on its way to the Willamette River.

42:29 minutes (38.91 MB)

What the Heck is a Green Bridge?

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 02/15/2010

Oregon has set ambitious goals for reducing our carbon emissions by 2020. But if all the currently proposed highway projects are built, any reductions that are achieved in other areas will be canceled out by increased auto use. How do plans to replace the I5 bridge between Washington and Oregon fit into this dilemma? While the proposed replacement bridge is being touted as a "green" bridge, most scenarios show that the currently proposed 12-lane bridge will only increase car trips across the Columbia River and help defeat the region's goal to dramatically reduce our carbon footprint. Should the new bridge have fewer lanes? Should there be tolls? Will light rail and bike lanes help reduce driving? Or should we not build a new bridge at all?

40:36 minutes (37.17 MB)

Democratizing the Energy Grid

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 02/22/2010

Oregon is about to institute a new incentive for households to power themselves using alternative energy sources like solar and wind. This method is called Feed-in Tarriff and is already in place in much of Germany as well as Vermont. Mark Pengilly and Judy Barnes, with Oregonians for Renewable Energy, join Locus Focus host Barbara Bernstein for a discussion about how feed-in tarrif can help democratize the energy grid. They'll talk about what feed-in tariffs are all about and where they fit into an overall renewable energy policy that moves us toward a sustainable solution to climate change and helps accomplish the switch from a fossil-fuel-based economy.

40:00 minutes (36.62 MB)

SUSTAINABLE SELLWOOD: THE MAKING OF COMMUNITY

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 03/01/2010

Last year a group of Sellwood residents created a neighborhood movement that helped shape the design and impact of the soon-to-be rebuilt Sellwood Bridge. At the height of this organizing drive, a neighborhood march drew hundreds of people from all corners of the neighborhood, united in a desire for a bridge that enhances the neighborhood's pedestrian and bicycle-oriented qualities. Locus Focus host Barbara Bernstein took part in the march and it was there that she met some of the guests on this week's Locus Focus, who join her for a discussion about creating sustainable projects in our neighborhoods that not only help mitigate climate change but also build a sense of community.

41:15 minutes (37.77 MB)

Climate Change is a Women's Issue

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 03/08/2010

Discussions about climate change usually focus on rising sea levels and reducing carbon emissions. What we don't hear about much is how climate change disproportionately impacts the lives of women in the developing world. On this special International Women's Day segment of Locus Focus, we look at why climate change is a women's issue, and learn about initiatives that can help women in the developing world to reduce the carbon footprints of their communities while at the same time empowering their lives.

37:17 minutes (34.14 MB)

PREPARING FOR CLIMATE CHANGE

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 03/15/2010

Climate scientists tell us that even if greenhouse gas emissions were halted tomorrow, the world's climate would not stabilize for decades. So even as we continue to reduce our carbon footprint, we need to start adapting to the inevitable. This morning we look at strategies that communities must begin to adopt to mitigate the worst impacts of climate change while preparing to adapt to its consequences.

41:53 minutes (38.34 MB)

EARTHQUAKES ALONG THE PACIFIC RIM

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 03/22/2010

As aftershocks from the massive earthquake last month in Chile continue to shake the earth, this week on Locus Focus, we look at why the earthquake that wreaked so much devastation in Chile is relevant to the rest of us living along the Pacific Rim. What does the Pacific NW have in common seismically with Chile and what can we learn from the Chileans about earthquake preparedness?

We talk about the science of earthquakes and the importance of earthquake preparedness with Portland State University Geology professor, Scott Burns. Scott will help us understand what all the shaking going on, is all about.

42:15 minutes (38.68 MB)

CAN URBAN ROOFTOPS PROVIDE HABITAT FOR WILDLIFE?

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 03/29/2010

Much of our urban landscape is paved over or covered with buildings, creating an environment that is the antithesis of nature. Rooftops and asphalt flush rain water into storm sewers, overburdening and polluting our rivers. Portland is fast becoming a leader in promoting vegetated rooftops to capture stormwater. Is it possible to go even further and actually create functional wildlife habitat on buildings that will help birds, bats, bugs and other animals as they traverse our urban landscape?

41:19 minutes (37.83 MB)

THE YES MEN FIX THE WORLD

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 04/05/2010

Sometimes the best way to expose the truth is to lie. . .

41:47 minutes (38.25 MB)

URBAN FARMING

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 04/12/2010

The Importance of Eating Locally

39:19 minutes (36.01 MB)

FIGHTING CELLPHONE TOWERS: A Trumpeter-maker's Battle

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 04/19/2010

Cellphone towers have become ubiquitous and although the jury is out on their safety, few people bother anymore to fight new ones going up in their neighborhoods. The common wisdom is that you can't win. Even local jurisdictions, like city and county governments, have little power to stop the siting of a new tower.

41:12 minutes (37.72 MB)

SUSTAINABLE GARDENING IN THE CITY with Community and Urban Horticulturalist Weston Miller

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 04/26/2010

It's time to plant your garden. This week on Locus Focus we look at how our relationship to food can help or hinder our efforts to create a sustainable community and lessen the impacts of climate change. With guest Weston Miller, the community and urban horticulturist with the OSU Extension Service for the Clackamas County and Metro Area, we talk about why learning to feed ourselves is an important part of creating sustainable and resilient communities. We also get some practical advice about what a sustainable garden looks like and learn how to plant a garden that uses minimal water, enhances wildlife habitat and can also produce good things to eat.

41:04 minutes (37.6 MB)

DOES PORTLAND HAVE A FOOD CZAR? (and why we need one)

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 05/03/2010

Portland is the only city in America that has a Food Policy and Programs Office. And while many communities are starting to talk about creating Food Policy Councils, Multnomah County and Portland have had such a council for years. So why is there so much interest in food and its politics here in the Rose City? And why should food policy be at the heart of any discussion about creating sustainable and resilient communities?

29:33 minutes (27.06 MB)

WHY ARE YOUNG PEOPLE DISCONNECTED FROM NATURE (and what we can do to reconnect them)

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 05/10/2010

Several years ago Locus Focus host Barbara Bernstein was walking in Forest Park when a young boy came running by, his eyes gleaming half in glee, half in terror. He was being pursued by his older brother and as he passed, he called out, "I feel like I'm in a video game."

34:44 minutes (31.81 MB)

THE MASSEY MINING DISASTER, THE BP OIL SPILL AND THE FUTURE OF CHEAP FOSSIL FUEL

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 05/17/2010

Last month, an explosion at the Upper Big Branch Mine in West Virginia resulted in the worst mining disaster in four decades. The mine is owned by Massey Energy. This company is notorious not only for committing numerous and flagrant safety violations in their mining operations, but also for pursuing mountaintop removal mining throughout Appalachia. The mining disaster has raised new awareness about the true costs of "cheap" coal. Since the last time we discussed this subject on Locus Focus, the Obama administration has taken some steps to regulate mountaintop removal mining, but how effective will these new regulations be?

40:58 minutes (37.5 MB)

FOOD SCRAP RECYCLING COMING TO YOUR CURBSIDE

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 05/24/2010

How much of your garbage is composed of food scraps? According to analysis in the Portland Recycles! Plan the average Portland household disposes of 1,326 pounds of garbage per year of which 75% could be recycled or composted instead of winding up as landfill. We can reduce the amount of greenhouse gas emissions produced by our garbage by approximately one ton for each ton of food scraps diverted from landfill.

56:52 minutes (52.07 MB)

COUNTRY NATURAL BEEF: FARMING IN THE MIDDLE

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 06/28/2010

On June 10 ranchers from across Oregon, Idaho and Washington descended upon downtown Portland for a country food fair sponsored by Oregon Natural Beef. This event provided an opportunity for these ranchers to meet the city folks who eat the meat that they raise, and for city eaters to get a glimpse of cowboy life. Oregon is fortunate to have a ranch co-op like Oregon Natural Beef that provides organic, hormone-free, grassfed sustainably-raised beef to a wide range of eaters—from the fancy diners at Higgins in downtown Portland, to Cleveland High School students grabbing a burger at the Burgerville across the street from their school, as well as shoppers at New Seasons and Whole Foods Markets.

43:10 minutes (39.52 MB)

BP'S OIL HEMORRHAGE AT THE BOTTOM OF THE GULF OF MEXICO

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 07/05/2010

Right now there are more unanswered questions than answers about what is happening with the hemorrhaging oil gusher at the bottom of the Gulf of Mexico and what will be its short and long term environmental, health and economic consequences. Portland environmental writer Lizzie Grossman returns from a trip to Gulf of Mexico to report on what she saw, the people she met and her first-hand impressions on the immensity of disaster created by the BP Oil hemorrhage on the floor of the Gulf of Mexico. We talk about the destruction that is already evident from this disaster and the even more disquieting concerns about what is yet to unfold.

55:34 minutes (50.87 MB)

PLUTONIUM WASTE AT THE HANFORD NUCLEAR RESERVATION REVISITED

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 07/26/2010

Restarting America's nuclear power industry is frequently suggested as a means of curbing greenhouse gas emissions. But advocates of this back to the future scenario should study Robert Alvarez's recent report showing that the amount of plutonium buried at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in Washington State is nearly three times what the federal government previously reported. This means that a cleanup to protect future generations will be far more challenging than planners had assumed. And that's before any more nuclear waste is added to the toxic legacy of Hanford's forty years of Plutonium production.

56:58 minutes (52.16 MB)

NATURAL GAS HYDRO-FRACTURING: AN IMPENDING ENVIRONMENTAL DISASTER

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 08/02/2010

Not too long ago North America's natural gas reserves were peaking out and the cost of natural gas began to skyrocket along with petroleum. Then all of a sudden, it seemed, we are being told that we have an almost endless supply of natural gas lying under much of the continent and that natural gas is the answer to our energy future. What we're not being told is that the unconventional process being used to extract this gas—called hydrofracturing—may potentially contaminate a wide swath of watersheds and drinking water systems across the country.

42:30 minutes (38.91 MB)

Crystal Springs: Stream of Consciousness

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 08/09/2010

Protecting endangered salmon runs in Oregon has been an ongoing challenge. It turns out that one of the simplest ways of enhancing salmon habitat in the city is to remove culverts that carry streams under roads, but block fish from swimming upstream to reach spawning and rearing habitat. One of the best potential salmon streams in the city is Crystal Springs Creek, with headwaters on the Reed College campus and the Eastmoreland Golf Course. This area was once marshy wetlands. Before development, the wetlands retained excess water from flood events and provided important rearing and refuge habitat for salmon, and foraging and nesting sites for beavers, birds, turtles, frogs, and other wildlife.

45:14 minutes (41.41 MB)

THE BP OIL DISASTER: APPROACHING THE AFTERMATH

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 08/16/2010

Now that oil has more or less stopped hemorrhaging from the Deepwater Horizon blowout, the mainstream media is reporting on a government study that claims that 75% of the oil that gushed into the Gulf of Mexico is gone. Only, that's not what the report actually said, and furthermore many scientists are disputing its methodology. On this segment of Locus Focus we'll find out what's really going on with all the oil from this disaster: along the beaches that line the Gulf Coast, on the surface of the Gulf of Mexico, as well as deep underwater where the oil is least easily detected. Dr.

43:15 minutes (39.59 MB)

GARDEN OF WONDERS

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 08/30/2010

As students return to school this fall in Portland, many of them will also be returning to harvest vegetables from gardens they planted last spring. School gardens are becoming a feature of a growing number of schools in the Portland area. . . and around the country. In these gardens students learn the connections between the food they eat and the health of the world around them.

40:30 minutes (37.08 MB)

FLOODS, FIRES AND CLIMATE CHANGE

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 09/20/2010

The summer of 2010 brought us some very dramatic weather extremes, from the monsoon flooding in Pakistan, and devastating mud slides in China, to the most intense heat wave and worst rash of forest fires that Russia has ever seen. Are these catastrophic events a sign that the impacts of climate change are already upon us? On this episode of Locus Focus host Barbara Bernstein talks with Oregon's State Climatologist, Phil Mote, about the significance of the historic floods and fires of the past summer, and what they portend for the future.

39:01 minutes (35.72 MB)

THE SALMONELLA EGG RECALL: ANIMAL WELFARE AND HUMAN HEALTH

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 09/27/2010

This past summer half a billion salmonella-tainted eggs were recalled. It turns out that these eggs were raised at huge factory farms in Iowa, where up to 300,000 hens are crammed into cages in filthy, rodent-infested sheds. The salmonella scare has made many people think twice about eating eggs, but according to Michael Greger, director of public health and animal agriculture at the Humane Society of the United States, it's not eggs that people should fear but the disease-ridden conditions in factory farms where these eggs are produced. This week on Locus Focus we talk with Dr. Greger about how industrial-scale factory farms impact the health and well-being of people as well as the animals confined in these operations.

42:27 minutes (38.86 MB)

WHAT'S HAPPENING WITH THE SELLWOOD BRIDGE?

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 10/04/2010

It's been nearly two years since a neighborhood-backed plan was approved to rebuild the Sellwood Bridge with only two auto lanes, along with bike and pedestrian paths and street car tracks. But in recent months the final decisions on bridge design and funding have hit stumbling blocks. While the bridge is operated by the County, it connects on the west side with state-owned Highway 43 and on the eastside with city-owned SE Tacoma Street. These different jurisdictions are now caught up in a turf battle, holding the future of the Sellwood Bridge between their horns.

29:37 minutes (27.12 MB)

CATACLYSMS ON THE COLUMBIA: THE FORCES THAT CARVED THE COLUMBIA GORGE

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 10/11/2010

Missoula Floods were one of the greatest sets of geological events in North America. Occurring as many as 40 times during the last ice age, the floods were caused by waters released from ancient Lake Missoula that scoured the Columbia River basin, carved out the Columbia River Gorge, and swept across at least 16,000 square miles of the Pacific Northwest. On this episode of Locus Focus, Portland State University geology professor Scott Burns returns to discuss the effect of the floods on the landscape of the Willamette Valley. He'll also share the incredible story of how geologist J. Harlen Bretz discovered evidence of the floods nearly 100 years ago.

26:16 minutes (24.05 MB)

HIGHWAY TO HELL: CANADIAN TAR SANDS EXTRACTION & THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 10/25/2010

Now that most of the easy oil on our planet is gone, oil companies are turning to exotic places to extract oil: deep under the ocean as well as from shale and sand formations. In the far north of Alberta, Canada, millions of acres of pristine boreal forest are being stripped-mined for a substance called bitumen, that holds oil in solid form. Since 2001 this operation has accelerated at a rate that industry and government can't even keep up with, and it has turned a once pristine wilderness into hell on earth.

39:29 minutes (36.15 MB)

PRE-ELECTION DAY SPECIAL: CALIFORNIA PROP. 23, DIRTY MONEY AND THE FUTURE OF THE PLANET

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 11/01/2010

The environment is on the ballot in hundreds of electoral contests in all 50 states, in the guise of anti-environmental, anti-science and anti-climate candidates and ballot measures. More than 750 congressional and state legislative candidates have signed on to support the anti-climate agenda of Americans for Prosperity—a corporate front group funded by the oil billionaire Koch brothers. In California the Koch brothers have spearheaded Proposition 23, a ballot measure to suspend the Global Warming Act of 2006. This law requires that greenhouse gas emissions in the state be cut to 1990 levels by 2020.

40:07 minutes (36.73 MB)

ALBERTA TAR SANDS - A WORSE ENVIRONMENTAL DISASTER THAN THE BP GULF OIL DISASTER?

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 11/08/2010

Last spring's BP oil disaster in the Gulf of Mexico alerted us to the unforeseen hazards of deep water oil drilling. Since most of the remaining conventional sources of oil are located in politically unstable regions of the world, many political leaders are looking toward the reserves of oil locked in the abundant bitumen under the boreal forests of northern Alberta as our best source of oil. The Alberta government and the Canadian oil industry claim that these tar sands mining operations are being managed in an environmentally responsible manner. But a team of scientists from the University of Alberta at Edmonton and other colleges in Canada released a report that contradicts the government and industry claims.

41:24 minutes (37.9 MB)

CAFO: THE TRAGEDY OF INDUSTRIAL ANIMAL FACTORIES

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 11/15/2010

Most Americans - and a growing number of people around the world - now eat meat that was grown on factory farms. The brutal, inhumane conditions in which factory farm animals are raised calls into question not just the ethics of eating meat but the very foundations of the democracy we like to believe we live in. CAFOs - Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations - crowd tens of thousands of animals together in their own filth, pumping them full of antibiotics and feed that their bodies are not designed to digest.

43:39 minutes (39.97 MB)

BE LOVE NOW - A Conversation with Rameshwar Das on the teachings of Ram Das

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 11/22/2010

Richard Alpert was an eminent Harvard psychologist on the fast track to success when he fell in with fellow Harvard professor Timothy Leary who turned him on to LSD. Harvard University did not appreciate their ardent research on the psychological and spiritual potentials unleashed by LSD and other psychedelic drugs, and in 1963 Alpert and Leary were tossed out of academia. Leary continued to bask in his iconic status in the psychedelic counter-culture, but for Alpert, mind expansion via chemical substances became a catalyst for spiritual seeking.

38:49 minutes (35.54 MB)

What Becomes of the Environment under a New Congressional Regime?

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 11/29/2010

In January a new congress takes over, with a reduced Democratic majority in the Senate and a lopsided Republican majority in the House. For the first time there will be an official House Caucus of Climate Change Deniers. In this new political environment, what prospects remain for continuing to maintain — let alone enhance — protection for the natural environment? And how can the United States provide any credible leadership in international negotiations to cutback greenhouse gas emissions when so many members of congress don't even believe that climate change is a real problem?

40:29 minutes (37.07 MB)

What does Last Month's Election Mean for Northwest Climate Policy?

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 12/06/2010

It's conventional wisdom that the new more heavily GOP configuration in Congress spells bad news for climate policy. There's some truth in that, but this week on Locus Focus we look at a more positive side to the story. In what has appeared to be an overall hostile political climate this fall, progressive approaches to climate policy still held their own in most elections across the Pacific Northwest and California.

41:45 minutes (38.22 MB)

TEMPERATE AND BOREAL RAINFORESTS OF THE WORLD

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 12/13/2010

The rallying cry: "Save the rainforests" means to most people tropical rainforests in the Amazon or Borneo. But there is another class of rainforests that is just as unique and important to protect: temperate and boreal rainforests. These rainforests, like their tropical counterparts, are rich in plants and wildlife, while they also contain some of the most massive trees on Earth. And some of these forests are virtually in our own backyards.

39:29 minutes (36.15 MB)

THE EAST SIDE BIG PIPE PROJECT

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 12/20/2010

For the past several years Portland's Environmental Services has been involved in the largest and most expensive public works project in the city's history: the Big Pipe. Since 2006 Rosie, the enormous tunnel boring machine, has been drilling a tunnel deep underground along the east bank of the Willamette River. When this project is finished in 2011, the volume of combined sewage and stormwater that now overflows to the river when it rains will be reduced by more than 94%.

57:01 minutes (52.2 MB)

FRACKING THE MARCELLUS SHALE

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program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 01/03/2011

The good news that abundant new natural gas deposits in the United States are driving down the once soaring cost of natural gas has a disturbing underbelly. Hydraulic fracturing, the unconventional method used to extract this gas is creating nightmares for people who live close to the drill sites. In extreme cases wells are being poisoned and water that comes out of the faucets in these homes can be set on fire.

43:02 minutes (39.41 MB)

HUMANITY ON A TIGHTROPE

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program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 01/10/2011

Paul Ehrlich is arguably the most infamous environmentalist of the modern era. His 1968 book The Population Bomb, raised awareness on the connections between exponential human population growth and environmental degradation. It is still iconic to some while a discomfort to others. But what Paul Ehrlic's has to say in his latest book, Humanity on A Tightrope, should find common ground with everyone. Which is what the book is about: how strengthening both empathy and a shared sense of kinship – even with seeming strangers living far away from us – are crucial steps to keep humanity from falling into global calamity.

39:37 minutes (36.28 MB)

SUSTAINABLE FOOD IN A SUSTAINABLE CITY with Portland's Food Czar

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program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 01/17/2011

Why is the city of Portland concerned about food policy issues? So, concerned in fact that the city's bureau of Planning and Sustainability devotes some of its resources to sustainable food programs like Urban Growth Bounty and the Better Together Garden at City Hall. On this episode of Locus Focus, we talk with Portland' "Food Czar" Steve Cohen, who manages the city's food policy and programs, about the need for these programs, why they are essential to creating sustainable communities.

41:16 minutes (37.79 MB)

Ground Zero in the Battle Over Genetically Engineered Sugar Beets

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program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 01/24/2011

Roughly half of the nation’s sugar supply comes from sugar beets, and much of this seed is produced in Oregon. In 2007 the USDA started allowing genetically modified sugar beet seed to flood the market. Now 95% of the sugar beet crop is grown using seeds that have been genetically engineered to resist heavy spraying of the Monsanto pesticide Roundup. The Center for Food Safety and other advocacy groups sued to ban the beets, pointing out that an environmental impact statement has not yet been completed, as the law requires. Last November, a U.S.

43:30 minutes (39.82 MB)

GINK—Green Inclinations, No Kids A Conversation with GRIST.ORG'S Lisa Hymas

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Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 01/31/2011

According to a 2009 study by statisticians at Oregon State University, each child an American has increases his or her lifetime carbon emission by 570 percent—because kids are likely to one day have kids of their own and so on. With climate change already causing havoc around the globe and the world population poised to hit 7 billion this fall, some people are wondering whether a sane response is to skip parenthood altogether.

26:49 minutes (24.56 MB)

FOOD JUSTICE - WHAT'S THAT?

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Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 02/14/2011
Food Justice is a term that we're beginning to hear a lot, but what does it really mean. This week on Locus Focus we'll learn about a conference happening in Eugene, February 19 - 21, that explores many facets of food justice: How do we ensure that our food system is sustainable? How do we guarantee access to healthy food for everyone?
41:10 minutes (37.69 MB)

FARMING BEYOND THE BARCODE

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Locus Focus
program date: 
Tue, 02/22/2011

While Barbara was in Eugene this week for the Food Justice Conference (check out last week's Locus Focus to learn more about this event), we repeated a Locus Focus episode from November 2009 that features, Joel Salatin, farmer, food choice advocate and dream-doer, who runs Polyface Farm in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia. Joel, Barbara and Willamette Valley farmer Clare Carver (of Big Table Farm in Gaston) discuss the sustainable agricultural methods Joel and Clare practice, based on polyculture and the interweaving roles of farm animals and crops.

40:37 minutes (37.18 MB)

The Act of Reclaiming Agriculture

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program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 02/28/2011

Oregon is blessed with many small family farms that have somehow managed to survive in a hostile environment dominated by behemoth industrial farming operations. Friends of Family Farmers, a statewide organization working to promote and protect socially responsible agriculture in Oregon, has spent the last couple years meeting with farmers around the state to hone legislation that will create a level playing field for small family farmers trying to compete in the corporate-dominated market place. The result of this two-year process is the Agricultural Reclamation Act, that Friends of Family Farmers is working to get passed during the current Oregon Legislative session.

39:59 minutes (36.61 MB)

Odessa: Genius and Death in a City of Dreams

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program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 03/07/2011

Until World War II, Odessa was one of Europe's great multicultural cities, a place of optimism and light. For nearly a century its colorful street life inspired poets and writers like Alexander Pushkin, Mark Twain and Isaac Babel. It was also a major center of Jewish culture, and by 1941 Odessa had 200,000 Jews living within its bounds—over a third of its population. But by the end of the war there were only 48 Jews left. Many had perished in a gruesome—but still largely unknown—episode of the Holocaust.

41:19 minutes (37.82 MB)

NUCLEAR CRISIS IN JAPAN & SELF-DEFENSE AGAINST GMO FOOD

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program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 03/14/2011

NUCLEAR CRISIS IN JAPAN

42:42 minutes (39.1 MB)

The Heavy Haul: Fighting Goliath

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program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 03/21/2011

While we worry about melting nuclear reactor cores and fuel rods in Japan, another environmental crisis is brewing closer to home. On this episode of Locus Focus we find out why the Alberta Tar Sands endanger the world and how its industrialized tentacles are trying to creep across the United States.

41:23 minutes (37.89 MB)

Fred Kirschenmann: Building Community Through Sustainable Farming

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program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 03/28/2011

Oregon is touted as one of the epicenters for the local food movement. As if to reinforce its credentials, there have been food related conferences up and down the Willamette Valley since the year began. Coming up on April 16 is one more conference, this time at the University of Portland in North Portland and it's called Food for Thought. The big name at the conference is food writer Michael Pollan who will be speaking in the evening. But throughout the day there will be several panels, featuring an assortment of interesting folks. This episode of Locus Focus features one of the speakers at a panel on sustainable and local food.

40:42 minutes (37.27 MB)

Changing Planet, Changing Health: A Conversation With Author Dan Ferber

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program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 04/04/2011

Climate change not only threatens the earth's ecosystems—it is damaging the health of people around the world. While early warning signals of ecological havoc brought on by climate change are being detected in arctic regions, its serious health impacts are most notable in the tropics. But as the planet continues to warm, we're beginning to see tropical diseases and the pests that spread disease moving into temperate regions around the globe. On this episode of Locus Focus we talk with science writer Dan Ferber, co-author of a new book, Changing Planet, Changing Health. Dan's book takes us to places like Mozambique, Honduras, and the United States for an on-the-ground investigation of how climate change is altering patterns of disease.

43:39 minutes (39.96 MB)

Update on Nuclear Disaster in Japan with Nuclear Expert Arjun Makhijani

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program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 04/11/2011

Day-to-day coverage of the ongoing nuclear disaster at the Fukushima nuclear power complex has slipped from the headlines. But the severity of the nuclear crisis in the wake of the March 11 earthquake and tsunami in Japan continues to unfold. Right after the earthquake, nuclear expert Arjun Makhijani was on Locus Focus discussing the short term and long range impacts from the damage to the Japanese nuclear facilities. He focused in particular on the danger of spent fuel rod pools overheating, something no one was talking about at the time. Shortly afterwards, the coolant in several of the Fukushima spent fuel rod pools evaporated resulting in fires and radioactive releases.

38:11 minutes (34.95 MB)

Portland Climate Action Now!

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program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 04/18/2011

In October 2009 the Portland city council adopted a climate action plan, setting in place the city’s ambitious sustainability roadmap to cut greenhouse gas emissions by 80 percent by the year 2050. A year and a half later the city is putting the action plan to work with its Portland Climate Action Now! campaign. As daunting a challenge as climate change presents, the city is helping its residents understand how individual choices we make everyday can have a huge impact on our collective carbon emissions.

44:14 minutes (40.49 MB)

HANFORD'S NUCLEAR LEGACY & LESSONS UNLEARNED FROM FUKUSHIMA

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program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 04/25/2011

The nuclear crisis that was triggered by the massive earthquake in Japan on March 11 has raised many questions about the vulnerability and safety of nuclear power installations throughout the world. But we've heard little discussion about the on-going saga of the radioactive wasteland two hundred miles upstream from Portland, at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation.

41:24 minutes (37.9 MB)

RECOVERING A LOST RIVER: An Interview with Author Steven Hawley

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program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 05/02/2011

In the Pacific Northwest, the Snake River and its wilderness tributaries were once some of the world’s greatest salmon rivers. As recently as a half century ago, they retained some of their historic bounty, with millions of fish returning to spawn. Now, due to four federal dams, the salmon population has dropped close to extinction. Efforts at salmon recovery through fish ladders, hatcheries, and even trucking them over the dams have failed.
 

35:07 minutes (32.14 MB)

THE VIKING IN THE WHEAT FIELD: An Interview with Author Susan Dworkin

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program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 05/09/2011

Genetic diversity is nature's path to survival. But over the course of agricultural history human beings have done an exceptional job at narrowing the genetic diversity of the crops we grow and eat. This limiting of the genetic pool ultimately results in crop failures and famine when disease or pestilence strikes. For the past century several scientists have worked tirelessly to rebuild a repository of seed varieties from around the world that can be used as breeding stock to breed new varieties of crops, such as wheat, that are resistant to whatever the current pestilence may be.

28:06 minutes (25.73 MB)

A SEA IN FLAMES: An Interview with author Carl Safina

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program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 05/16/2011

It's been over a year since an explosion on the Deepwater Horizon Oil Rig in the Gulf of Mexico produced one of the worst environmental, economic and social disasters this country has ever experienced. This event should have become what some call a teachable moment - when this country would take a hard look at our addiction to oil and recognize its untenable consequences. But as we've seen, this hasn't happened.

45:59 minutes (42.1 MB)

IN THE YEAR OF SEVEN BILLION: An Interview with Andrew Revkin

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Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 05/23/2011

Andrew Revkin's Dot Earthblog covers climate change, the environment and sustainability, and introduces itself in this way: "By 2050 or so, the human population is expected to reach nine billion, essentially adding two Chinas to the number of people alive today. Those billions will be seeking food, water and other resources on a planet where, scientists say, humans are already shaping climate and the web of life." This year the earth's population is expected to exceed 7 billion people.

42:58 minutes (39.34 MB)

WILL CHINA BECOME THE WORLD'S LEADER IN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT?

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program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 06/06/2011

After many years of being considered the carbon-emitting elephant in the room, now China is being touted as the new leader in green and carbon-reducing technologies. A new report produced by the Climate Group describes China's plans, spelled out in its 12th Five Year Plan covering 2011 - 2015 to curb its carbon emissions and set significant targets for low-carbon energy, energy efficiency and clean technology over the next five years.

41:54 minutes (38.36 MB)

DAMNED DAMS, SALMON & THE COLUMBIA RIVER

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program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 06/13/2011

This spring there has been so much water rushing down the Columbia River, fed by overabundant snow packs from the Rockies to the Cascades, that a surplus of electricity is overwhelming the power grid. So instead of spilling more water over the dams, the Bonneville Power Administration decided to shut off electricity generated by the windfarms that now dot the hills above the Columbia River. They claim this measure is meant to protect salmon.

38:22 minutes (35.12 MB)

PORTLAND'S FOOD ZONING CODE UPDATE PROJECT

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program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 06/20/2011

Portland is becoming a mecca for urban farmers but the city's zoning codes have yet to fully catch up with the growing phenomenon of guerrilla vegetable gardens and urban livestock. Recognizing the connections between food and the community’s environmental, economic and physical health, the City of Portland has initiated a project to update its zoning code to promote traditional and emerging ways of producing and distributing food. On this episode of Locus Focus host Barbara Bernstein is joined by Steve Cohen, who heads all things related to food for the city's Bureau of Planning and Sustainability.

41:39 minutes (38.14 MB)

COSMIC INFLUENCES ON AGRICULTURAL PROCESSES: A Conversation with Organic Farming Pioneer Harry MacCormack

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program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 06/27/2011

Harry MacCormack is legendary in the annals of the Oregon organic farming movement. A co-founder of Oregon Tilth, he has gone on to help organize numerous other sustainable food projects including the Ten Rivers Food Web and the Willamette Valley Bean and Grain Project. On this episode of Locus Focus, Harry joins host Barbara Bernstein to talk about his new book, COSMIC INFLUENCES ON AGRICULTURAL PROCESSES, which concerns itself with the impact of celestial forces on agriculture in the Willamette Valley. We'll also discuss how climate change and other potential cataclysms need to be factored into future agricultural scenarios for the region.

42:53 minutes (39.26 MB)

THE FATE OF COLUMBIA RIVER SALMON Continuing Our Conversation with Environmental Writer Steven Hawley

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program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 07/04/2011

Any day now U.S. District Judge James Redden will come down with a decision that will determine the fate of salmon on the Columbia River. He is considering the merits of a plan submitted last year by the Obama administration to address the significant harm done to salmon by the gauntlet of federal dams along the river system, that juvenile salmon must navigate on their way out to the ocean and surmount again three to five years later when they return as adults to spawn. This plan is almost indistinguishable from previous plans that were rejected by the courts. The plan currently under scrutiny also rolls back important protections now in place and will cost almost $1 billion per year over the next 10 years.

59:14 minutes (54.23 MB)

TROPIC OF CHAOS: An Interview with Christian Parenti

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program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 07/11/2011

What does climate change have to do with armed conflicts erupting throughout the developing world? In his new book TROPIC OF CHAOS: CLIMATE CHANGE AND THE NEW GEOGRAPHY VIOLENCE, Christian Parenti argues that a new era of climate war is upon us.

46:31 minutes (42.59 MB)

A CATASTROPHIC CONVERGENCE: The Oil Spill in the Yellowstone River & the Proposed Keystone XL Pipeline

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program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 07/18/2011

On July 1 an ExxonMobil oil pipeline running under the Yellowstone River near Billings, MT ruptured, dumping massive amounts of oil into the river. Critics of the proposed Keystone XL Pipeline—that would carry oil from the Tar Sands pits of Alberta to refineries along the Gulf Coast—point to this accident as one more reason why the Keystone XL Pipeline should be stopped.

42:19 minutes (38.74 MB)

SOLWEST FAIR - Renewable Energy Action in Eastern Oregon

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program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 07/25/2011

Portland might consider itself the hub of the sustainable movement but every summer in Grant County, Oregon, a major event takes place to rival anything in our urban center. On this episode of Locus Focus we'll learn about the SolWest Fair that takes place every summer in John Day. This three-day event offers activities for all ages and knowledge levels, as participants from around the West and beyond come to join the SolWest community and learn about energy efficiency, solar and wind energy, alternatively fueled vehicles and more.

We'll talk about the SolWest Fair with Jennifer Barker from EORenew, the group that sponsors this annual fair.

41:07 minutes (37.64 MB)

E-205 with Portland Commissioner Nick Fish

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program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 08/01/2011

Portland is touted for its great parks system, but if you live on the far east side of the city, east of I-205 you wouldn't know it. But hopefully that is about to change. Over the years, Portland Parks & Recreation has acquired a number of great properties for future parks on the east side. They have already completed Master Plans for several sites and made initial improvements where funding allowed. And when a bond measure is passed in 2-3 years, building out new east side parks will be a priority.

46:53 minutes (42.92 MB)

The End Of Growth - An Interview with Richard Heinberg

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program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 09/12/2011

Conventional economic theory flies in the face of ecological reality. How can a global economy premised on perpetual growth survive in a closed system, which is our planet earth? On this episode of Locus Focus, we talk with Richard Heinberg, author of a new book, The End of Growth, which proposes a startling diagnosis: the expansionary trajectory of industrial civilization is colliding with non-negotiable natural limits which include resource depletion, environmental impacts of unfettered industrial growth and crushing levels of debt.

42:37 minutes (39.02 MB)

OUR DYING PLANET - An interview with ecologist Peter Sale

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program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 09/26/2011

Coral reefs are on track to become the first ecosystem actually eliminated from the planet, a potential eradication being caused by us. Human activities are creating enormous changes on this planet which sustains us, and the alarming plight of coral reefs is just one of these. On this episode of Locus Focus we talk with ecologist Peter Sale, whose new book Our Dying Planet uses the motif of endangered coral reefs to explore the many ways we are changing our planet and to explain why it matters. But despite the gloomy title, Sale's book emphasizes that a gloom-and-doom scenario is not inevitable.

41:37 minutes (38.1 MB)

THE DOLLAR LAKE FIRE: LOOKING BACK AT THE FIRE SEASON

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program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 10/03/2011

The fires this summer on the northface of Mt. Hood struck a dark chord for many of us who know and love the trails, basins and ridges of this rugged and least-accessible face of the mountain. Yet while we may feel great sadness imagining our favorite places scorched and blackened by the fires, it's important to remember the vital role that fire plays in regenerating the woods. After the fire the forest comes back, but it takes time. On this episode of Locus Focus we talk with forest ecologist Dominick DellaSalla about the vital role that fire plays in the cycle of life and death in a forest.

41:34 minutes (38.06 MB)

EMPIRE OF THE BEETLE Author Andrew Nikiforuk on the Bark Beetle's Seige of North American Forests

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program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 10/10/2011

A bug the size of a rice kernel is killing off more than 30 billion pine and spruce trees in North America. Historically bark beetles are not pests. A bark beetle can probably hear the distressed song of a drought stricken tree and for tens of millions of years they have been pruning or collapsing ailing, aging or drought stricken forests.

32:11 minutes (29.46 MB)

DEEP FUTURE: THE NEXT 100,000 YEARS OF LIFE ON EARTH

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program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 10/17/2011

For the past few weeks we've been discussing relatively short term implications of climate change on a variety of ecosystems. On this episode of Locus Focus we look at how the course we take in the near future—whether to curb our appetite for fossil fuels or continue the status quo of spewing carbon dioxide into the atmosphere—will impact life on this planet not just for the next century but for the next 100,000 years. Our guest, paleoclimatologist Curt Stager, has written a new book, Deep Future: The Next 100,000 Years of Life on Earth, in which he details the long-lived effects of the fossil fuel binge that has shaped the last two hundred years of human civilization.

30:20 minutes (27.76 MB)

FELLING THE CONDIT DAM

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program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 10/24/2011

For a century dams have blocked salmon runs throughout the Pacific Northwest. These dams have wiped out or greatly reduced many of the salmon runs in the Columbia River Watershed, which was once the greatest salmon river in the west. But in the past few years, some of these dams have been removed. On October 25th, the Condit Dam on the White Salmon River in Klickitat County, WA, will be the next large dam to fall. After years of controversy and many missed deadlines, the dam will be blown up to make way for salmon to return to the upper reaches of the White Salmon River.

On this episode of Locus Focus we are joined by self-proclaimed river rat Steven Hawley to talk about what the restoration of the White Salmon River means for salmon and the rest of us.

42:24 minutes (38.81 MB)

THE MOVEMENT TO STOP THE KEYSTONE XL PIPELINE

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program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 10/31/2011

Alberta's Tar Sands operations have been stirring up controversy north of the border for some time now, Last month awareness of Alberta's tar sands mining began to spread as thousands of activists gathered in Washington, D.C. to protest the Keystone XL pipeline, that is being proposed to carry the bitumen mined in Alberta all the way to Gulf Coast ports in Texas for refinement. Now it's no longer just environmentalists who are opposing the pipeline. Latest critics include the governor of Nebraska, who is concerned that spills of highly corrusive bitumen along the way might contaminate the aquifers that provide water to the Great Plains states.

42:00 minutes (38.45 MB)

WILD IN THE CITY

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program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 11/07/2011

One of Portland's best known attributes is the easy access to all kinds of spectacular nature. Mountains, rivers, the Columbia River Gorge and the Oregon Coast are all within an easy drive from the city. One of Portland's best kept secrets is the abundance of natural areas in the metro area itself, including forests, wetlands and meadows close to downtown. Urban naturalist Mike Houck has been on a mission for years to protect and promote the city's hidden natural treasures. Over a decade ago he collaborated with M.J. Cody on a collection of natural history essays and nature rambles by foot, bike and boat, that introduced places where you can experience peak moments of nature right inside or close to the city.

42:55 minutes (39.3 MB)

The Coal Hard Truth

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program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 11/14/2011

In the past year the Northwest made major strides towards being coal-free, as deadlines were set to shut down the regions' last coal-fired power plants. But while the Northwest is moving away from relying on coal to generate its own electricity, there is a movement afoot to transform Northwest ports into a major infrastructure for shipping coal to Asia. Trainloads of coal from Wyoming would make their way across the Pacific Northwest, spewing toxic coal dust and diesel pollution, putting safety at risk, clogging the railroads, and contributing to climate change the whole way.

42:32 minutes (38.94 MB)

Re-creating a Local Food System - The Willamette Valley Bean and Grain Project

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program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 11/21/2011

There is a lot more to eating locally than buying produce at your neighborhood farmers' market. What about all the staple foods we rely on, like grains and beans, that provide most of the calories in our diet? While Oregon's Willamette Valley has the agricultural potential to feed the valley residents twice over, nearly ninety-five percent of what we eat in the Willamette Valley is imported and what's grown here is exported. With the price of all fossil fuels on the rise, a lot of people are beginning to think that this makes no economic or agricultural sense.

43:00 minutes (39.38 MB)

HIGH VOLTAGE: The Fast Track to Plug in the Auto Industry

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program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 11/28/2011

Transportation accounts for about a third of all carbon dioxide emissions in America. Cars and trucks are the biggest source of our smog pollution, according to the Union of Concerned Scientists. Gas prices are rising, the dependence on foreign oil is an ongoing concern, and local air pollution is not improving. This makes a powerful case for cleaner cars. Are electric cars the answer?

42:55 minutes (39.29 MB)

ANOTHER WAY THE RIVER HAS: An Interview with Author Robin Cody

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program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 12/26/2011

Rivers define Oregon. They shape the landscapes and wildlife habitats as well as human settlements and politics of this very watery place. There are few people who know and can describe Oregon's rivers like Oregon author Robin Cody. On this episode of Locus Focus, Robin joins us to describe his river adventures and reflections, whether he is canoeing the entire length of the Columbia River or floating the Willamette and lower Columbia in his handmade motorized boat, the Turtle. For Robin, the river is a metaphor for our lives, just as our lives are metaphors for the river. Along the way, we'll touch base with his latest collection of essays: Another Way the River Has.

59:35 minutes (68.19 MB)

WEIGHING IN: Obesity, Food Justice & The Limits of Capitalism - An Interview with Julie Guthman

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program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 01/02/2012

There is little doubt that Americans are getting fatter. As an example, a new Coast Guard regulation requires that the Washington State Ferries reduce their maximum capacity by 250 passengers because the average body weight of individual passengers has increased by 25 pounds. Common wisdom attributes the rise in obesity to the high caloric/low nutrient levels of the junk food that many people eat and to the auto-centric, pedestrian-hostile physical environments in which they live.

58:11 minutes (33.29 MB)

FRACKING CRACKS THE PUBLIC CONSCIOUSNESS

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program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 01/09/2012

2011 was the year that fracking became a household word. A little over a year ago opposition to fracking was limited to a select group of environmental activists and people unfortunate to have their water supplies contaminated by neighboring fracking operations. But by the end of the year major media was reporting on independent scientific investigations that linked fracking with water pollution. And federal and state agencies were responding to the growing apprehension about water contamination with more studies and more regulation. What has changed in the last 12 months to ratchet up opposition to this use of hydraulic fracturing to extract natural gas from the deep recesses of shale deposits?

39:32 minutes (36.2 MB)

LATEST POLITICAL BRINKSMANSHIP AROUND KEYSTONE XL PIPELINE

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program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 01/16/2012

Last November the Obama administration responded to intense public opposition to the Keystone XL pipeline—which would carry crude oil from Alberta's tar sands, to refineries on the Gulf Coast—by calling for additional environmental impact studies that could take more than a year to complete. This decision made many pipeline opponents hopeful, if not celebratory. But then six weeks later, as part of a deal to extend the payroll tax cut, congressional Republicans required that the administration make a decision on the project within 60 days.

49:11 minutes (56.29 MB)

SCARED SICK - An Interview with Author Robin Karr-Morse

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program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 01/23/2012

When we talk about environmental health hazards, we usually are referring to toxins in the environment outside our bodies. But there are environmental health hazards inside our bodies as well. Chemicals and hormones triggered by stress and trauma can wreak havoc on our nervous systems and ultimately result in serious disease. In her new book Scared Sick, Portland family therapist Robin Karr-Morse, explores how many adult diseases, ranging from fibromyalgia to diabetes, as well numerous psychological disturbances, are rooted in childhood trauma.

43:34 minutes (39.88 MB)

FRIENDS OF FAMILY FARMERS - Growing a New Generation of Sustainable Farmers

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program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 01/30/2012

More and more people are concerned about where their food comes from, how it is grown and who grows it. But if more of us want to eat locally grown, sustainable food, we also need to grow a new generation of farmers commited to sustainable agricultural principles. Who is going to ensure that new farmers can find affordable land close to markets and can navigate the unpredictable and often turbulent waters of full-time farming? We are fortunate in Oregon to have an organization dedicated to just that. On this episode of Locus Focus we talk with Leah Rodgers, field director for Friends of Family Farmers, about how her organization supports family farmers across the state who are dedicated to sustainable agriculture.

43:19 minutes (39.66 MB)

AUTHOR CARL SAFINA: VOYAGE OF THE TURTLE & VIEW FROM LAZY POINT

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program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 02/06/2012

"[Sea] turtles don't think about their next generation, but they risk and provide all they can to ensure that there will be one. Meanwhile, we profess to love our offspring above all else, yet above all else it is they from whom we daily steal. We cannot learn to be more like turtles but from turtles we could learn to be more human. That is the wisdom carried within one hundred million years of survival. What turtles could learn from us,  I can't imagine." (Carl Safina, Voyage of the Turtle)

31:48 minutes (36.4 MB)

HIGH VOLTAGE: The Fast Track to Plug in the Auto Industry, Revisited

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program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 02/13/2012

Transportation accounts for about a third of all carbon dioxide emissions in America. Cars and trucks are the biggest source of our smog pollution, according to the Union of Concerned Scientists. Gas prices are rising, the dependence on foreign oil is an ongoing concern, and local air pollution is not improving. This makes a powerful case for cleaner cars. Are electric cars the answer?

30:01 minutes (27.48 MB)

WEIGHING THE PLIGHTS OF TWO ENDANGERED POPULATIONS: Marbled Murrelets and Oregon Timber Counties

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program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 02/20/2012

In the 1990s the spotted owl became the icon for environmentalists' struggle to save the remaining old growth forests in the Pacific Northwest. But the spotted owl is not the only specie that needs old growth forests to survive. Twenty years ago the Marbled Murrelet was added to the list of threatened species whose populations have been severely declining due to intensive logging in old growth forests. For over a decade, Oregon was engaged in developing a habitat conservation plan that would have provided a modicum of protection for marbled murrelet. But it has abandoned that effort.

43:04 minutes (39.43 MB)

OREGON'S CITIZENS UTILITY BOARD - Celebrating Director Bob Jenks' 20th anniversary

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 02/27/2012

This year Oregon's Citizens' Utility Board is celebrating the 20th anniversary of their executive director Bob Jenks' tenure at the helm of CUB. CUB itself has been around since 1984 but many Oregonians probably don't know how much they owe this advocacy group. In its three decades of service, CUB has saved Oregon ratepayers $5.3 billion. It's also led the way for Oregon's investment in energy efficiency, by helping create the Energy Trust of Oregon in 2002 and working for passage of the state's 25% Renewable Energy Standard.

43:58 minutes (40.25 MB)

THE VIEW FROM OAKS BOTTOM - with Portland Parks & Recreation Ecologist Mark Wilson

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 03/05/2012

The city of Portland is noted for its proximity to outstanding natural areas—Mt. Hood, the Columbia Gorge, Oregon's North Coast. But Portland is also a great place to live because of the abundance of natural areas within the city itself. On this episode of Locus Focus we return to one of the city's nature jewels: Oaks Bottom, a 170-acre wildlife refuge complex of wetlands, meadows and woods, 4 miles SE of downtown Portland as the crow flies, and maybe a bit further if you're following the route of one of the bottoms' many Great Blue Herons. Why is Oaks Bottom such a treasure for Portland residents and what is being done to enhance its wildlife habitat?

43:36 minutes (59.88 MB)

HANFORD NUCLEAR RESERVATION: A REGIONAL NUCLEAR NIGHTMARE

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 03/12/2012


26:29 minutes (36.36 MB)

HOW FORESTED RIPARIAN ZONES KEEP STREAMS HEALTHY

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program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 03/19/2012

For a long time we've known that streams shaded by riparian forests provide healthier habitat for salmon and other wildlife. A new study led by Daniel Sobota at Oregon State University confirms that riparian zone forests not only provide streams with needed shade to support salmon, they also help clean up high levels of nitrate pollutants from human activities that infiltrate waterways. In the study Sobota and his colleagues looked at nine streams in Oregon’s Willamette Valley that flowed through forest, agricultural or urban landscapes. Among their goals was to discover how much nitrogen was absorbed by the streams near the source, and how much went downriver.

42:06 minutes (57.82 MB)

THE FUTURE IS NOT ALL DOOMED - A Conversation with Carl Safina

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program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 04/02/2012

In this age of climate change, species extinction and exponentially expanding human population, it's hard not to feel like we're doomed. So it's important that we find voices to listen to that offer some glimmers of hope. On this episode of Locus Focus we are joined again by writer and marine conservationist Carl Safina, who has witnessed as well as anyone, how much damage results from too many humans obsessed with using up every ounce of our planet's natural resources without concern for future generations. Yet Safina remains a voice of hope as he searches for examples of what is working. His writing offers models for how we can re-orient our values, visions and practices of living on the earth like we are part of its natural systems.

38:11 minutes (52.44 MB)

HOUSING RECLAIMED: SUSTAINABLE HOMES FOR NEXT TO NOTHING

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 04/09/2012

The American Dream of owning your own home has been battered by the economic crisis that started in 2008. While it has become much harder harder to achieve this dream, there is a surge of interest in finding resourceful, affordable and environmentally friendly ways of creating housing to meet this challenge. On this episode of Locus Focus we talk with Jessica Kellner, editor of Natural Home and Garden Magazine, about some alternative approaches that non-conventional home builders are taking to build homes that reduce landfill waste, rely on recycled or sustainably sourced material, cost relatively little money and help create stronger communities.

44:24 minutes (60.97 MB)

NESTLE IN THE GORGE

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program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 04/16/2012

In late February the Oregon Water Resources Department (OWRD) issued the first set of permits necessary to facilitate Nestlé’s proposal to take and bottle water in the Columbia River Gorge. This decision came despite overwhelming public opposition to the plan. Now opponents are taking the next steps to prevent Nestle's Cascade Locks bottled water facility from becoming a reality. Why are so many people opposed to this bottled water plant? What impact will diverting water from Oxbow Spring, a pristine stream in the Columbia Gorge, have on fish and wildlife habitat?

42:22 minutes (58.17 MB)

PROTECTING OLD-GROWTH FORESTS: Keys to Prepare for Climate Change

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 04/23/2012

This past winter the Forest Service released its long anticipated final planning rule for the nation's 155 national forests and 20 national grasslands. The plan validates what many scientists have been saying for years: mature and old-growth forests play a critical role in reducing climate change and providing clean drinking water to millions of Americans. On this episode of Locus Focus, we talk with Dominick A. DellaSala, Chief Scientist and President of the Geos Institute in Ashland, Oregon, about why we need to remain vigilant about protecting our precious forest resources, especially in this current political climate in which amped up logging is being promoted as job creation.

44:26 minutes (61.03 MB)

GARBOLOGY: Our Dirty Love Affair with Trash - An Interview with author Edward Humes

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 05/07/2012

What is America's largest export, most prodigious product and greatest legacy? It's our trash. Each of us in on track to toss 102 tons of garbage in the course of our lifetime. Our disposable plastic alone outweighs the entire U.S;. Navy. But we don't like to think about our trash. We send it on trains, trucks or barges to landfills  hundreds of miles from where the garbage was created. We don't have to see it, but in so many ways the disposable, non-biodegradable items that fill our trash are coming back to haunt us, in forms like the Great Pacific Garbage patch of plastic that threatens marine life and ultimately our own.

30:14 minutes (41.52 MB)

FOOD FIGHT: What You Need to Know about the Food and Farm Bill with Dan Imhoff

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 05/14/2012

Why should you care about the Farm Bill if you're not a farmer or live in a farm state? The short answer is: because you eat and the Farm Bill is really about how our food is grown, what kinds of food gets grown and who gets to eat it.

29:35 minutes (40.63 MB)

JUST HOW CLEAN ARE ELECTRIC CARS: An Interview with Don Anair, Union of Concerned Scientists

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 05/21/2012

Everybody knows an electric car doesn’t use gasoline, but since it gets its power from the electric grid, the question remains: How clean is an electric car?

A new report from the Union of Concerned Scientists, “State of Charge: Electric Vehicles’ Global Warming Emissions and Fuel Cost Savings Across the United States,” is a first-of-its-kind analysis of the emissions EVs create from charging on an electric grid and how the cost of that charging compares to filling up a gasoline-powered vehicle. On this episode of Locus Focus we talk with Don Anair, the report’s author and senior engineer for UCS’s Clean Vehicles Program about the report’s findings and what is the future for electric vehicles.

42:47 minutes (58.77 MB)

WHY THE O&C TRUST ACT CAN'T SEE THE FOREST FOR THE TREES?

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 05/28/2012

For the past year Oregon news has been filled with stories of timber-dependent counties on the brink of bankruptcy. Beginning in 1937 these 18 western Oregon counties benefited from federal timber receipts, as they overcut old growth forests on western BLM lands—the so-called "O&C" lands granted to the Oregon and California Railroad in 1866 and taken back by the government in 1916 for violating terms of the land grant. The unsustainable clearcutting of old-growth forests, and the receipts they generated, plummeted in the early 1990s when the threat to salmon, wildlife, clean water and watersheds could no longer be ignored. Congress cushioned the fall by instituting direct federal payments to help transition the counties away from dependence on federal subsidies.

46:19 minutes (63.6 MB)

THE CRASH COURSE with CHRIS MARTENS: Understanding the Interdependence of our Economy, Environment, and Energy Systems

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program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 06/04/2012

Chris Martenson used to be part of the 1%. Five years ago he traded his McMansion and position as Vice President of a Fortune 500 company for a much simpler life in rural western Massachusetts. Now his goal is to shed light on the limits of our present economic model of infinite growth as we increasingly face the realities of a planet with finite resources. His video lecture series "The Crash Course" takes on the future challenges of our economy, energy systems and the environment. According to Martenson, "it's where these fields intersect that the greatest story of any generation will be told."

38:46 minutes (53.23 MB)

GIFTS OF THE CROW - An Interview with Author and Ornithologist John Marzluff

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 06/11/2012

Several years ago Locus Focus host Barbara Bernstein watched a crow delicately extract from a narrow paper bag a Subway sandwich that was lying in the gutter. Once the sandwich was free of its wrapper, the crow remained curbside, happily feasting on its prize. This observation gave Barbara a newfound fascination and respect for crows. As it turns out, the wily intelligence she witnessed that morning is a common attribute of crows and their corvid relatives: ravens, magpies and jays. Crows are not only extremely smart, they also have highly developed social skills, and it turns out, share many qualities with humans, which occasionally inspires interspecies communication between corvids and people.

42:13 minutes (57.97 MB)

THIS IS YOUR OCEAN ON ACID

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 06/18/2012

Over the past 100 years, levels of carbon in the atmosphere have risen 30%—to 393 parts per million. One thing that has kept global warming in check is that the oceans absorb a third of that carbon dioxide. Until recently the process of oceans soaking up our excess CO2 was considered beneficial. But the 22 million tons per day of carbon dioxide that the oceans are taking up is beginning to wreak havoc on ocean ecosystems. Scientists are discovering that all this carbon dioxide is causing the ocean to rapidly acidify, changing ocean ecosystems in profound ways.

45:08 minutes (61.98 MB)

HARVEST THE WIND: An Interview with Author and Environmental Lawyer Philip Warburg

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 06/25/2012

HARVEST THE WIND: An Interview with Author and Environmental Lawyer Philip Warburg

Wth the rising threat of climate change and the steady depletion of fossil fuels, wind power is arguably the only renewable energy resource ready to meet a significant portion of our energy needs. Yet on a national level, the United States has failed to make a meaningful commitment to support further development of wind's full potential to generate electricity. Wind power does not only meet resistance from the fossil fuel industry.

43:14 minutes (59.38 MB)

CASCADIA'S FAULT: PREPARING FOR THE BIG ONE

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 07/02/2012

It used to be that when people talked about the "Big One," they were referring to the next giant earthquake along the San Andreas Fault, that in the parlance of the time, might cause California to fall into the ocean. It turns out that the fault to watch is the much longer and potentially damaging Cascadia Subduction Zone, a fracture in the earth’s crust roughly 60 miles offshore, that starts just north of the San Andreas Fault in northern California and runs all the way to northern Vancouver Island. This fault generates a monster earthquake about every 500 years. The last time it shook was in 1700 and there is roughly a 30 percent chance that just such a disaster could happen within the next fifty years.

43:27 minutes (59.67 MB)

THE POISON BENEATH US

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 07/09/2012

Over the past several decades, U.S. industries have injected more than 30 trillion gallons of toxic liquid deep into the earth, using broad expanses of the nation's geology as an invisible dumping ground. No company would be allowed to pour such dangerous chemicals into the rivers or onto the soil. But until recently, scientists and environmental officials have assumed that deep layers of rock beneath the earth would safely entomb the waste for millennia

On this episode of Locus Focus we talk with Abrahm Lustgarten, whose recent series of articles for ProPublica, investigates a legion of problems and potential catastrophes inherent with the practice of pumping deadly toxins beneath the surface of the earth.

41:17 minutes (56.7 MB)

JOHNSON CREEK: 2012 STATE OF THE WATERSHED REPORT

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 07/16/2012

Johnson Creek flows 26 miles from its headwaters near the Sandy River to its confluence with the Willamette River, passing through five cities (Gresham, Portland, Milwaukie, Damascus, and Happy Valley) and two counties (Clackamas and Multnomah) along the way. Once a favorite camping and fishing spot for Native people, the creek was degraded by decades of abuse when white settlers took over the landscape. For years, Johnson Creek was known primarily as an eyesore that frequently flooded. Over the last few decades a growing number of people have become determined to right past wrongs in the Johnson Creek Watershed and return the creek to something of its former natural glory.

43:58 minutes (60.38 MB)

TEN YEARS AFTER THE BISCUIT FIRE: A RETROSPECTIVE IN A SUMMER OF FIRE

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 07/23/2012

TEN YEARS AFTER THE BISCUIT FIRE: A RETROSPECTIVE IN A SUMMER OF FIRE

In mid July of 2002 a series of lightning strikes ignited a number of small fires in some very remote mountainous areas of SW Oregon. The fires merged into what became known as the Biscuit Fire, the largest fire that year in North America. Burning across an area of over 500,000 acres it was the largest fire in Oregon history - until this summer. Once the fire was extinguished political conflagrations erupted over how to manage the fire-affected wilderness landscape. Those arguments are still echoing ten years later as we experience another summer of extreme wildfires across the West.

42:50 minutes (58.82 MB)

A NEW URBAN FOOD ZONING CODE FOR PORTLAND

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 07/30/2012

Portland has long been a center of ad-hoc urban agriculture. For many decades, Portlanders have grown vegetables in their backyards. Over the past 30 plus years, community gardens have sprung up where people without adequate yard space can also garden. And now an increasing number of folks are raising livestock in town as well. The City of Portland has supported in theory this booming movement of farmers' markets, community gardens, backyard farming, community supported agriculture and food buying clubs. But zoning code regulations have not kept pace and in many cases are cumbersome or contradictory.

44:10 minutes (60.65 MB)

NOTHING THAT IS POISONED CAN GROW: THE RICHMOND OIL REFINERY FIRE

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 08/20/2012

At 6:30 in evening on Hiroshima Day this month, the Chevron Oil Refinery in Richmond exploded in a massive fire, spreading a mushroom cloud of thick black smoke over the homes and gardens of the residents of this marginalized community. That night thousands of people flocked to local hospitals complaining of respiratory problems. No one seems to know what toxins were contained in that dark cloud that settled over the city for a couple hours, before the winds changed and the toxic cloud dispersed above more affluent communities. In the aftermath of the fire which burned out of control for over six house, Richmond residents not only worry about the toxins they may have inhaled during the fire.

43:20 minutes (59.51 MB)

Odessa: Genius and Death in a City of Dreams

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 12/24/2012

 Rebroadcast of program originally aired on 3/7/2011

Until World War II, Odessa was one of Europe's great multicultural cities, a place of optimism and light. For nearly a century its colorful street life inspired poets and writers like Alexander Pushkin, Mark Twain and Isaac Babel. It was also a major center of Jewish culture, and by 1941 Odessa had 200,000 Jews living within its bounds—over a third of its population. But by the end of the war there were only 48 Jews left. Many had perished in a gruesome—but still largely unknown—episode of the Holocaust.

41:05 minutes (56.42 MB)

HURRICANE SANDY, SEA LEVEL RISE AND THE WORLD WE NOW LIVE IN

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 01/07/2013

The storm surge generated by Hurricane Sandy, flooding significant areas across Greater New York and New Jersey, demonstrated that the specter of climate change and the disasters it will wreak are now upon us. As the Northeast engages in a slow recovery from the storm's damage, a debate is now raging about how to prevent similar destruction from the inevitable next super storm.

41:32 minutes (57.04 MB)

 

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