Voices from the Edge

About the program …

Community dialogue is important. At 8am every Thursday Voices from the Edge lends a KBOO microphone to informed guests you might not hear anywhere else. With an hour to invest, the call-in format engages listeners in meaningful conversations about crucial issues like racial disparity, government accountability, environmental justice and politics on local, state and national levels. Join lively discussions about concerns that are important to you and our community. Together we’ll make Oregon and our nation a better place for a larger number of those living here.

About the host

Jo Ann Hardesty is Principal Partner at Consult Hardesty. She serves as a subject matter expert on a myriad of issues and is available as a speaker, facilitator and campaign planner. A long-time voice for Portland's under-represented communities and a leader in the struggle against racial and economic injustice, Jo Ann was three times elected to the Oregon legislature and for many years Executive Director of Oregon Action. She’s been called on by the City of Portland to help re-write the City Charter and organizes those on the downside of power to pursue their interests from the local to the federal level. She is particularly committed to leadership development and in holding those in power accountable.

Join the conversation …

Join the conversation every Thursday morning from 8-9 a.m. by calling 503-231-8187. Keep the conversation going after the program at our blog at kboo.fm/voicesfromtheedge.

Engineering: Steve Nassar 

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Episode Archive

Voices from the Edge on 03/12/09

Air date: 
Thu, 03/12/2009 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
Concerned over Central City Concern; Also Marching for Peace

Central City Concern, with a $33 million annual budget and 23 buildings, is the city's biggest nonprofit landlord in downtown Portland. Some of the nonprofit's tenants, however, say their landlord has let apartment buildings fall into disrepair and disregarded tenants'demands for action or even a chance to speak to Central City Concern's board about the problem.

Voices from the Edge on 03/05/09

Air date: 
Thu, 03/05/2009 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
Soccer Fields or Social Services? The Real Cost of Urban Renewal Districts.

Next week the Portland City Council consider an $85 million proposal by Merritt Paulson to bring major league soccer to Portland. Paulson wants the city to contribute $20-$40 million of urban renewal money - funds intended to combat "urban blight" - to close the deal. Paulson and his supporters ay sthose dollars will create jobs and enhance the community. Critics not only say that soccer doesn't qualify but that its diverting funds from essential county services.

Voices from the Edge on 02/26/09

Air date: 
Thu, 02/26/2009 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
Health Disparity and the County Budget Crisis; Testing for Anti-Black Bias

African Americans in Multnomah County are twice as likely to die from diabetes or stroke than white county residents. Hispanic mothers are two times less likely to have early prenatal care white mothers. Native Americans in the county die from HIV at three times the rate of whites.

Voices from the Edge

Air date: 
Thu, 02/19/2009 - 8:00am - 9:00am

Hosts Jo Ann Bowman and Dave Mazza discuss the recent report on racial profiling put out by the Portland Police Bureau. Later they speak with Oregon State representative Chip Shields about his racial impact bill that would require lawmakers to consider the potential racial or ethnic impact of proposed criminal justice legislation.

Voices from the Edge on 02/12/09

Air date: 
Thu, 02/12/2009 - 8:00am - 9:00am

Host Jo Ann Bowman talks about winners & losers in the final Economic Stimulus Package.

 

Voices from the Edge on 02/05/09

Air date: 
Thu, 02/05/2009 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
Breaking down the poverty barriers: An interview with Dr. Donna Beegle

Poverty is more than a lack of resources. It creates barriers that isolate the poor from the rest of the community and from opportunities to break free from its grip. That isolation also extends to having a voice in research and program development for breakding down poverty's barriers.

Voices from the Edge on 01/29/09

Air date: 
Thu, 01/29/2009 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
Livability or Big Brother: Portland Police's Secret List

The Portland Police Bureau is keeping a list of people arrested most often downtown. The police say that the list, which has grown from 35 to nearly 400, is part of a coordinated strategy to improve livability in Old Town and surrounding neighborhoods by arresting chronic offenders and holding them in jail where they can receive drug, acohol and other treatments to end their criminal behavior. Defense attorneys say that people are being labeled as chronic offenders based on arrests rather than convictions. They also say these people have no way of appealing their placement on the list, are being prosecuted more harshly than other offenders, and may represent another form of racial profiling by the police. Dan Saltzman, the city's new police commissioner, has endorsed the program and suggested it may be expanded to other areas of the city to cover other issues like prostitution.

Jo Ann and Dave talk with David Fidanque, executive director of the Oregon chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union about the secret list. Earlier this month the ACLU filed a legal challenge over the constitutionality of the list.

New Feature!

The conversation doesn't end when the program does. You can join in additional discussion of the week's issue on our blog at kboo.fm/voicesfromtheedge (click on the "blog" tab). You'll find additional information, important links, comments from other listeners and commentary from Jo Ann and Dave. Have a question for our guests, but can't call in during the program? Post your questions on line so we can make them a part of the Voices discussion.

Voices from the Edge on 01/22/09

Air date: 
Thu, 01/22/2009 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
Doees Portland Have a Real Solution for its Gang Problem?

Portland has seen 11 gang-related shootings since the Dec. 12 murder of a gang member inside the New Hope Missionary Baptist Church. City leaders are calling it a "gang war crisis" and the Portland police want a new coordinated strategy to combat the violence. But the call for action comes when many outreach programs are struggling for funding. Will the city's new effort address the causes or just the symptoms of gang violence? Will the rush to take action create bigger problems like innocent youth getting profiled for gang involvement?

Voices from the Edge

Categories:
Air date: 
Thu, 01/15/2009 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
The New Congress and the Economy

Next week the new U.S. Congress will begin working with a new administration in the White House. Behind the smiles and calls for cooperation, there's already signs of differences between both sides of the congressional aisles and the president elect. How will this play out as Congress and the new president face the challenge of turning the economy around?

This week on Voices from the Edge, Jo Ann and Dave look at what we can expect from the new Congress, its relationship with the new president and what that means in terms of fixing the economy.

Voices from the Edge

Categories:
Air date: 
Thu, 01/08/2009 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
Winners and Losers in the 2009 Oregon Budget

Next week the new Oregon legislature will face the challenge of crafting a budget in the midst of a deep economic crisis. Governor Kulongoski wants to spend shrinking state revenues to spur the growth of green industries, even if it means cutting services to seniors, the disabled and the poor. Will Oregon lawmakers follow the governor's lead or develop a different strategy to keep Oregon open for business in these hard times? Who will be the winners and who will be the losers in the upcoming budget fight? Join Jo Ann and Dave this Thursday as they take a look at proposals for the 2009 Oregon budget. 

Audio

Voices from the Edge on 03-15-12

Categories:
program date: 
Thu, 03/15/2012

Sizing up Oregon's 2012 annual legislative session

Last week, Oregon lawmakers adjourned the state's first-ever annual session. Among the legislation passed by gavel's fall were bills to create a health insurance exchange, reorganize and expand state early childhood programs, increase the number of tax-friendly enterprise zones, protect homeowners facing foreclosure, and establishing new marine reserves off the coast. Lawmakers also revised the 2011-13 state budget to reflect an estimated $340 million revenue shortfall.

This week, Jo Ann and Dave talk with State Rep. Tina Kotek (D-HD44), Democratic Caucus Leader, about what was - and what wasn't accomplished during this new annual legislative session.

Jo Ann Hardesty is a former state legislator, former director of Oregon Action and past board president of Portland Community Media, as well as a long-time leader in the struggle for racial and economic justice. Dave Mazza is a journalist and former editor of The Portland Alliance who has covered and been involved in Portland's civil rights, environmental, labor and peace movements for over 20 years.

Join Jo Ann and Dave every Thursday as they bring you guests and conversations on issues that are important to you. Support Voices from the Edge by becoming a KBOO member (just click the "tip jar" in the upper right-hand corner on KBOO's homepage to find out how) or consider becoming an underwriter of this program (contact KBOO's underwriting director for details).

Co-Hosts: Jo Ann Hardesty and Dave Mazza

Producers: Dave Mazza and Jo Ann Hardesty

Program Engineer: Steve Nassar

Audio Editor: Alicia Olson

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  • Title: VFE 03-15-12
  • Genre: Rock
  • Year: 2012
  • Length: 40:42 minutes (37.26 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Voices from the Edge on 03-08-12 Young Women and Reproductive Rights

program date: 
Thu, 03/08/2012

Young Women and Reproductive Rights

Host Jo Ann Hardesty speaks with Deborah Westlight, a young volunteer at Planned Parenthood Columbia Willamette, about her views on issues related to young women and reproductive rights.

http://www.plannedparenthood.org/ppcw/

Deborah was recently profiled by Youth Empowered Action Camp, a leadership summer camp for 12-17 year olds who want to make a difference in the world. http://www.yeacamp.org

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Jo Ann Hardesty is a former state legislator, former director of Oregon Action and past board president of Portland Community Media, as well as a long-time leader in the struggle for racial and economic justice. Dave Mazza is a journalist and former editor of The Portland Alliance who has covered and been involved in Portland's civil rights, environmental, labor and peace movements for over 20 years.

Join Jo Ann and Dave every Thursday as they bring you guests and conversations on issues that are important to you. Support Voices from the Edge by becoming a KBOO member (just click the "tip jar" in the upper right-hand corner on KBOO's homepage to find out how) or consider becoming an underwriter of this program (contact KBOO's underwriting director for details).

Co-Hosts: Jo Ann Hardesty and Dave Mazza

Producers: Dave Mazza and Jo Ann Hardesty

Program Engineer: Steve Nassar

Audio Editor: Alicia Olson

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  • Title: VFE 03-08-12
  • Genre: Other
  • Year: 2012
  • Length: 56:15 minutes (51.5 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Voices from the Edge on 03-01-12 Oregon lawmakers don't make the grade on racial equity

program date: 
Thu, 03/01/2012

Oregon lawmakers don't make the grade on racial equity

Communities of color are the fastest growing communities in Oregon, more than doubling in size - 21.5 percent of the total population - in the last two decades. But racial disparity continues to run deep despite this change. Many communities of color experience poverty rates two to three times higher than white Oregonians. Although the futue of Oregon's prosperity depends on fair opportunities and economic stabilty for all Oregonians, state lawmakers continue to fall short in dealing with these racial and economic gaps.

This week, Jo Ann and Dave talk with Western States Center's Kalpana Krishnamurthy the recently released 2011 Oregon Legislative Report Card on Racial Equity which evaluates the performance of state lawmakers in tackling this problem. Do our legislators make the grade? Join us in looking at where the 2011 Oregon Legislature succeeded and failed in facing up to our state's racial equity problem.

Jo Ann Hardesty is a former state legislator, former director of Oregon Action and past board president of Portland Community Media, as well as a long-time leader in the struggle for racial and economic justice. Dave Mazza is a journalist and former editor of The Portland Alliance who has covered and been involved in Portland's civil rights, environmental, labor and peace movements for over 20 years.

Join Jo Ann and Dave every Thursday as they bring you guests and conversations on issues that are important to you. Support Voices from the Edge by becoming a KBOO member (just click the "tip jar" in the upper right-hand corner on KBOO's homepage to find out how) or consider becoming an underwriter of this program (contact KBOO's underwriting director for details).

Co-Hosts: Jo Ann Hardesty and Dave Mazza

Producers: Dave Mazza and Jo Ann Hardesty

Program Engineer: Steve Nassar

Audio Editor: Alicia Olson

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  • Title: VFE 03-01-12
  • Genre: Other
  • Year: 2012
  • Length: 56:42 minutes (51.92 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Voices from the Edge on 02-23-12 Gwen Trice and a Forgotten African American Community

Categories:
program date: 
Thu, 02/23/2012

Gwen Trice and a Forgotten African American Community

You won't find African American loggers or Oregon's only segregated school in the public murals or other memorials to our state's history. It took a black woman from La Grande who was interested in her father's early years in Oregon to bring to light the story of Maxville, a company town near Wallowa in eastern Oregon where 50-60 African Americans lived and worked in the timber industry.

This week, Jo Ann and Dave talk with Gwen Trice whose queries about her father turned into the documentary The Logger's Daughter. Her interviews with former Maxville residents and their descendants captures a unique time and place in Oregon history and reveals our state's past is far more diverse than we know.

Jo Ann Hardesty is a former state legislator, former director of Oregon Action and past board president of Portland Community Media, as well as a long-time leader in the struggle for racial and economic justice. Dave Mazza is a journalist and former editor of The Portland Alliance who has covered and been involved in Portland's civil rights, environmental, labor and peace movements for over 20 years.

Join Jo Ann and Dave every Thursday as they bring you guests and conversations on issues that are important to you. Support Voices from the Edge by becoming a KBOO member (just click the "tip jar" in the upper right-hand corner on KBOO's homepage to find out how) or consider becoming an underwriter of this program (contact KBOO's underwriting director for details).

Co-Hosts: Jo Ann Hardesty and Dave Mazza

Producers: Dave Mazza and Jo Ann Hardesty

Program Engineer: Steve Nassar

Audio Editor: Alicia Olson

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  • Title: VFE 02-23-12
  • Genre: Other
  • Year: 2012
  • Length: 55:07 minutes (50.46 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Voices from the Edge on 02-16-12 Exploring fear and loathing on the Populist Right with Arthur Goldwag

program date: 
Thu, 02/16/2012

Exploring fear and loathing on the Populist Right with Arthur Goldwag

Its no surprise that the confluence of the internet and the 24-hour news cycle has enabled extreme groups once relegated to the fringe of American politics to enjoy unprecedented influence on political discourse. The paranoia and scapegoating of today's Tea Party, however, reflect a disturbing pattern in our history that fueled hysteria about the Illuminati of the 1790s, anti-New Deal forces of the 1930s, and McCarthyism of the 1950s. What is new about the "new hate" is its ability to project itself and the willingness of politicians to exploit it for their own purposes.

This week, Jo Ann and Dave discuss this disturbing political trend with Arthur Goldwag, author of The New Hate: A History of Fear and Loathing on the Populist Right. Goldwag is a freelance writer whose other works include Cults, Conspiracies and Secret Societies and -Isms and -Ologies. He will be reading from The New Hate Thursday evening at Powell's Books.

Jo Ann Hardesty is a former state legislator, former director of Oregon Action and past board president of Portland Community Media, as well as a long-time leader in the struggle for racial and economic justice. Dave Mazza is a journalist and former editor of The Portland Alliance who has covered and been involved in Portland's civil rights, environmental, labor and peace movements for over 20 years.

Join Jo Ann and Dave every Thursday as they bring you guests and conversations on issues that are important to you. Support Voices from the Edge by becoming a KBOO member (just click the "tip jar" in the upper right-hand corner on KBOO's homepage to find out how) or consider becoming an underwriter of this program (contact KBOO's underwriting director for details).

Co-Hosts: Jo Ann Hardesty and Dave Mazza

Producers: Dave Mazza and Jo Ann Hardesty

Program Engineer: Steve Nassar

Audio Editor: Alicia Olson

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  • Title: VFE 02-16-12
  • Genre: Other
  • Year: 2012
  • Length: 52:45 minutes (48.3 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Voices from the Edge on 02-02-12 The case against austerity: A conversation with David Cay Johnston

Categories:
program date: 
Thu, 02/02/2012

The case against austerity: A conversation with David Cay Johnston

At last month's World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, austerity was repeated like a mantra by bankers, economists and politicians. The idea that governments, like families, must cut back when income declines is so entrenched in the public discourse that few in public office or the media are willing to challenge it. Yet the austerity mantra ignores the basic economic principle that "spending equals income and income equals spending." Cutting spending means income will fall, yet in this election year, our leaders continue to push for firing teachers, firefighters, government clerks and others without heeding the consequences on our economy.

This week, Jo Ann and Dave talk with Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist David Cay Johnston about why the austerity mantra appeals to the top one percent while offering disaster for the rest of us. A 13-year veteran of The New York Times, Johnston won the Pulitzer in 2001 for uncovering loopholes and inequities in the U.S. tax code. He is the author of several best-selling books, including: Free Lunch: How the Wealthiest Americans Enrich Themselves at Government Expense (and Stick You with the Bill) and the soon-to-be released The Fine Print: How Big Companies Use "Plain English" and Other Tricks to Rob You Blind.

Jo Ann Hardesty is a former state legislator, former executive director of Oregon Action and past board president of Portland Community Media as well as a long-time leader in the struggle for racial and economic justice. Dave Mazza is a freelance journalist and former editor of The Portland Alliance who has covered and been involved in Portland's civil rights, environmental, labor and peace movements for over 20 years

Join Jo Ann and Dave every Thursday as they bring you guests and conversations on the issues that are important to you. Support Voices from the Edge by becoming a member of KBOO today (just click the "tip jar" in the upper right corner of the KBOO website to find out how).

Co-Hosts: Jo Ann Hardesty and Dave Mazza
Producers: Dave Mazza and Jo Ann Hardesty
Program Engineer: Steve Nassar
Audio Editor: Alicia Olson

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  • Title: VFE 02-02-12
  • Genre: Other
  • Year: 2012
  • Length: 43:07 minutes (39.48 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Voices from the Edge on 01-26-12 Life in and after a cult

program date: 
Thu, 01/26/2012

Life in and after a cult: A conversation with a former member of "The Move"

Sam Fife began offering his vision of divine rule on earth in his small New Orleans church in the 1960s. By 1979, when Fife died in an airplane crash, The Move of the Spirit had grown into an international ministry that included thousands, many living separated from society in communal farms. The Move taught that members were creating a society in which people were free to hear and be led by divine prophecy. Ex-members, however, paint a different picture: a corrupt system of leadership that used physical, sexual and psychological abuse to maintain control.

This week, Jo Ann and Dave talk with Lisa Kendall about her experience as a member of The Move. Kendall was nine years old when her mother joined the cult, spending her formative years on a communal farm without access to the outside world. Seeing the heartbreak of the children she grew up with motivated Kendall to raise awareness about this little known issue. She is currently working on a network of resources for people challenged by the unique lifestyle of an extreme religious cult.

Jo Ann Hardesty is a former state legislator, former executive director of Oregon Action and past board president of Portland Community Media as well as a long-time leader in the struggle for racial and economic justice. Dave Mazza is a freelance journalist and former editor of The Portland Alliance who has covered and been involved in Portland's civil rights, environmental, labor and peace movements for over 20 years

Join Jo Ann and Dave every Thursday as they bring you guests and conversations on the issues that are important to you. Support Voices from the Edge by becoming a member of KBOO today (just click the "tip jar" in the upper right corner of the KBOO website to find out how).

Co-Hosts: Jo Ann Hardesty and Dave Mazza
Producers: Dave Mazza and Jo Ann Hardesty
Program Engineer: Steve Nassar
Audio Editor: Alicia Olson

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  • Title: VFE 01-26-12
  • Genre: Other
  • Year: 2012
  • Length: 55:10 minutes (50.52 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Voices from the Edge on 01/19/12 Stories from Survivors of the Sex Trade

program date: 
Thu, 01/19/2012

Stories from Survivors of the Sex Trade

Portland prides itself on an open attitude about personal choice. A dark side of the city's libertarian bent has been a long-thriving sex trade. Until last year, the city held the dubious honor of second place for juvenile sex trafficking arrests and numbers for those over 18 involved in prostitution remain high. Despite, growing awareness of the nature of sex trafficking, a broad misconception remains that prostitution is a matter of choice. Jeri Williams, a survivor of the trade, notes "in reality, most of these girls are forced into it, sometimes even sold into it by a parent.

This week, Jo Ann and Dave talk with Ann Singer and Rachel Cerise Indigo Baum of Lunacy Stageworks production, Stories: From Survivors of the Sex Trade. Part of the Fertile Ground Festival, "Stories" presents readings, autobiographical sort stories and interviews from sex trade survivors, providing audiences an unfiltered look at life in the trade. Singer is Lunacy Stageworks' artistic director and Baum is a survivor sharing her story in the production."Stories" is being presented Jan. 27-28 at the Sellwood Masonic Temple.
 
Jo Ann Hardesty is a former state legislator, former executive director of Oregon Action and past board president of Portland Community Media as well as a long-time leader in the struggle for racial and economic justice. Dave Mazza is a freelance journalist and former editor of The Portland Alliance who has covered and been involved in Portland's civil rights, environmental, labor and peace movements for over 20 years

Join Jo Ann and Dave every Thursday as they bring you guests and conversations on the issues that are important to you. Support Voices from the Edge by becoming a member of KBOO today (just click the "tip jar" in the upper right corner of the KBOO website to find out how).

Co-Hosts: Jo Ann Hardesty and Dave Mazza
Producers: Dave Mazza and Jo Ann Hardesty
Program Engineer: Steve Nassar
Audio Editor: Alicia Olson
 
 
 

  • Title: VFE 01-19-12
  • Genre: Other
  • Year: 2012
  • Length: 56:23 minutes (51.63 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Voices from the Edge on 01-12-12 Police accountability and remembering Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

program date: 
Thu, 01/12/2012

A look at where we are with police accountability and remembering Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
 
How to make police more accountable to the community remains a hot-button issue in Portland. While the number of fatal police shootings was down in 2011, the ability change the culture of the police bureau through effective citizen oversight remains a bone of contention for the community, elected officials, and the police union. What progress has been made? What are the challenges in the coming months? 

This week, Jo Ann and Dave talk with Dr. LeRoy Haynes, Senior Pastor of the Allen Temple Christian Episcopal Church and Dr. T. Allen Bethel, Senior Pastor of Maranatha Church. Both men are leaders in the Albina Ministerial Alliance Coaltiion for Justice and Police Reform and long-time police accountability advocates. They'll talk about recent gains and targets for the coming year that could create institutional changes in how Portland polices the community.

Also this Thursday, the celebration of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s birthday (Jan. 19) offers an opportunity for Jo Ann, Dave and their guests to look at what lesson's Dr. King's life and contributions offer to today's civil rights movement.
 
Jo Ann Hardesty is a former state legislator, former executive director of Oregon Action and past board president of Portland Community Media as well as a long-time leader in the struggle for racial and economic justice. Dave Mazza is a freelance journalist and former editor of The Portland Alliance who has covered and been involved in Portland's civil rights, environmental, labor and peace movements for over 20 years

Join Jo Ann and Dave every Thursday as they bring you guests and conversations on the issues that are important to you. Support Voices from the Edge by becoming a member of KBOO today (just click the "tip jar" in the upper right corner of the KBOO website to find out how).

Co-Hosts: Jo Ann Hardesty and Dave Mazza
Producers: Dave Mazza and Jo Ann Hardesty
Program Engineer: Steve Nassar
Audio Editor: Alicia Olson
 
 
 

  • Title: VFE 01-12-12
  • Genre: Other
  • Year: 2012
  • Length: 35:13 minutes (32.25 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Voices from the Edge on 1-05-12 Will Occupy Portland "occupy" Oregon's next legislative session?

program date: 
Thu, 01/05/2012
Will Occupy Portland "occupy" Oregon's next legislative session?
 
The encampment is gone but the movement isn't. Occupy Portland has spent the weeks following the police closure of the downtown encampment engaging Portlanders in a conversation about where the movement goes from here. Like its decentralized fellow Occupy groups, OP isn't sticking to one argument or one solution. Among the areas of action being considered in making the power of the 99 percent felt more strongly in Salem during the legislative session. A forum is taking place on Jan. 8 to provide Portlanders an opportunity to shape the agenda of an OP legislative campaign.
 
This week, Jo Ann and Dave speak with Occupy Portland members about how to mobilize Occupy Portland in ways that can shape legislative action in Salem and what role a legislative agenda will play in the broader goals of OP. Join the conversation will be Heidi Sackos, a wife, grandmother and semi-retired employment and mental health counselor who was drawn to OP by the movement's ability to "communicate that it saw the same injustices" she had been seeing. Also joining the conversation will be Alex Pio, who has served in a OP in various positions since its inception and sees the movement as key to advancing ecological economics, sustainability and electoral reform. To learn more about what OP is doing, visit their online media outlet, thePortland Occupier, and the OP online calendar page.
 
Jo Ann Hardesty is a former state legislator, former executive director of Oregon Action and past board president of Portland Community Media as well as a long-time leader in the struggle for racial and economic justice. Dave Mazza is a freelance journalist and former editor of The Portland Alliance who has covered and been involved in Portland's civil rights, environmental, labor and peace movements for over 20 years
 
Join Jo Ann and Dave every Thursday as they bring you guests and conversations on the issues that are important to you. Support Voices from the Edge by becoming a member of KBOO today (just click the "tip jar" in the upper right corner of the KBOO website to find out how).
 
Co-Hosts: Jo Ann Hardesty and Dave Mazza
Producers: Dave Mazza and Jo Ann Hardesty
Program Engineer: Steve Nassar
Audio Editor: Alicia Olson
 
 
  • Title: VFE 01-05-12
  • Genre: Other
  • Year: 2012
  • Length: 55:42 minutes (50.99 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Comments

Foreclosure Mills

I just wanted to post a link to an article about the foreclosure mills that make money off of the forsclosure mess.  http://motherjones.com/politics/2010/07/david-stern-djsp-foreclosure-fannie-freddie?page=1

taxing "gross" income?

can you clarify?

don't the measures increase rates on taxable income, not gross income, as the first caller mentioned? 

Still waiting for my apology from Joann

Dear Ms. Bowman,

I did not hear an apology for you making a blatant distortion of my comment.  I do not appreciate being lied about and especially by a campaign which you obviously are supporting which hypocritically poses as the moral arbitrator of the Universe regarding truth telling.

Again, let me clarify:

First off, I did not say, as was falsely stated by you and your guest, that politicians have a right to lie.  I stated that everyone has a right to lie about their love life.  That is a vastly different point and I bitterly resent being lied about on this.

This distortion (lie) by your guest and you is sadly emblematic of the hyperbolic nature of this entire pesudo-moralistic campaign.

I will receive your apology before I ever again associate with you or this program.

Sinverely,

Will Ware

It

Lying about lying on the Edge

I don't know how to get an email to the disc jockey.

Will again and please correct your slander of me and misstatement of my comment.

First off, I did not say, as was falsely stated by JoAnn and your caller, that politicians have a right to lie.  I stated that everyone has a right to lie about their love life.  That is a vastly different point and I bitterly resent being lied about on this.

This distortion (lie) by your guest and JoAnn is emblematic of the hyperbolic nature of this entire pesudo-moralistic campaign.

It is a fact that Republicans involved in this are using this as an organizing tool.  It is a fact that this campaign is making common-cause with anti-progressive forces.

It is this campaign that is the divisive force in our community.

This signature campaign is the darling of the right wing.  This campaign is the best thing that has happened to the Multnomah Co. Republican Party since Theodore Roosevelt.

If this is about negative campaigning- WHY IS THIS SUCH A THOROUGLY NEGATIVE CAMPGAIGN.  IT REDUCES POLITICAL DIALOG TO THE LEVEL OF A GRAMMER SCHOOL PLAYGROUND.

 

Cops and Race

Very interesting program today (8/6/09). Here's a germane link to an article by Kevin Alexander Gray in The Progressive "Citizens have the right to talk back to the police":

http://www.progressive.org/mpgray080409.html

In my view, a well trained cop could have and should have defused the situation far short of arrest.

Too frequently, cops escalate situations, especially when dealing with people of color.

As Mr. Alexander sums up in the final sentence of his article: "We should never have to fear when we stand up for our rights." And that goes for people of all hues.

Citizens have the right to talk back ...

I agree, Peter. This article is germane: One outcome of Professor Gate’s arrest should be an understanding that “What lends legitimacy (to our legal system) is our belief that the police are dutiful servants of the people — not their arbitrary oppressors.”

The Declaration of Independence promptly asserts “… Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just Powers from the consent of the governed.”

'Know Your Rights' training is imperative, as a 'check and balance' against unwarranted interference with the intent of the U.S. Constitution. An informed citizenry is a Public Good. Vigilance against abuse of power is actually a civic responsibility.

I know first-hand a tendency by Portland police to escalate situations that might be otherwise resolved. I have only an inkling of the mental pressures involved in policing, and but a dim suspicion as to the social handicaps that come with wielding weapons, spending so much time in the milieu of antisocial behavior, of having a community grant your uniformed subgroup status as The Enforcers. I would suspect such pressure, status and lethal equipment make it difficult to appreciate a role of Servant of the People.

Do you know what the common ground may be?

Law enforcement.

How can we change our dialogue so that a person of color, being thrown up against chain link fence – sometimes even without a pretext of wrongdoing – has standing when there is no probable cause that a crime is being committed?

By advocating that police actions adhere to Constitutional provisions for freedom from unwarranted search, to be secure in their possessions; would not this citizen also be involved in law enforcement?

One really ironic point I failed to make on the program is that, from the time of Chief Kroeker onward, it has likely been in the consciousness of Portland Police Bureau command that racial profiling actually inhibits criminal detection and prosecution. Simply the perception of police misconduct reduces the quality of public cooperation. One of the results of racial bias is that it is more difficult to secure leads and eventual witness testimony from a disenfranchised, victimized population of law-abiding citizens.

I suggest there will be a real reduction in crime (due to citizen cooperation) when and if policing is seen to be done lawfully. If it were a shared perception that people who oppose the immoral, unethical and illegal practice of racial profiling had merit as Constitutional law enforcers, I would think this a positive dynamic … and not just for people of color, but other negatively affected groups like the mentally ill, for whom self-advocacy is a supreme challenge.

Let us fuse training and dialogue. You mention the ‘well-trained cop.’ Perhaps ‘Know Your Rights’ training (and Oregon Action training includes de-escalation strategies) might dovetail with Portland Police Bureau training. What would be achieved if police training alerted officers that a segment of the population - fatigued by unconstitutional behavior - will be advocating for just and equitable treatment?

If that segment of the population included Police Commissioner Saltzman, Human Rights Commissioner Fritz, City Auditor Griffin-Valade and Mayor Adams, I think the Police union would find impetus to engage in negotiations for a means to weed out officers refusing to enforce the Constitution, state law, or bureau regulations.

To take up your point about police as public servants, the Auditor’s Independent Police Review Board is poised to actually adopt that frame of reference. Currently specializing in facts and figures, there is a component of their reporting primed and ready for public pressure to make this a prime frame of reference for assessing the Police Bureau’s functionality.

Perhaps better left for another blog, I just want you to know that civilian oversight of armed government activity is imperative as the nation pursues a War on Terror. If the City of Portland were to weigh in on fundamental human rights during the nation’s general expansion of police powers, it stands likely to do a Public Good that cannot now be calculated.

Environment: global warming

On this morning's (June 18) program Joann mentioned a man (I think she said "young" and "minority" )who is becomming active in environmental matters, I would like to talk with him about joining the planning and implementation of an event that is scheduled to take place on October 24th.

I am a member ot the Peace and Social Concerns Committee of the Multnomah Monthly Meeting of Friends (Quakers), and the organizer of a sub-group called "Global Coolers". We meet monthly and have taken the responsibility of informing the Meeting about global warming and involving them in efforts to lessen our individual and collective destructive impact on the planet.We have also hosted a couple of community events over the past several years.
Yesterday I learned that Bill McKibben, who is a leading activist in the environmental protection movement, is organizing a world-wide demonstration to take place on October 24: it is described on 350.org.
I want to make sure that Portland participates in this event.
I have not talked yet to other environmental activists about involvement (there may already be plans afoot) but I will do so in the next couple of days. In any case I will welcome all participants in the planning and execution of the event. My telephone number is 503-292-1817.
Thank you for your attention.
Peace, Jim

Measure 53

I was disturbed to hear this morning information that leads me to think I did not check out the ballot measures carefully enough. As an intelligent conservative, I find it both important and difficult to listen to KBOO and other left-of-center sources regularly, and the comments this morning made it clear that I should invest more energy into that effort.

On the other hand, I was a bit amused (and relieved of my nascent guilt) when I heard you adamantly insist that Measure 53 passed by a 76-24 margin because a day-old paper said so. It is possible that the Oregonian was that far off the mark - if so, I would assume that it was an early edition which showed very preliminary results. I went to three sources this morning of which two gave vote tallies. KATU.com indicates that as of 8am today the vote on 53 was YES 475,838 and NO 473,912 which is a margin of less than 2000 votes out of nearly 1 million. Rounded to the nearest percent, the vote is 50-50. KOIN.com had very similar (probably identical) numbers.

So I figure that if you let your personal opinions cloud such simple and easily ascertained facts, if you are so closed-minded that you will not double-check this when it is disputed, I need not concern myself with your judgment on the more complex issue of Measure 53 itself.

- Gordon

 

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