Voices from the Edge

About the program …

Community dialogue is important. At 8am every Thursday Voices from the Edge lends a KBOO microphone to informed guests you might not hear anywhere else. With an hour to invest, the call-in format engages listeners in meaningful conversations about crucial issues like racial disparity, government accountability, environmental justice and politics on local, state and national levels. Join lively discussions about concerns that are important to you and our community. Together we’ll make Oregon and our nation a better place for a larger number of those living here.

About the host

Jo Ann Hardesty is Principal Partner at Consult Hardesty. She serves as a subject matter expert on a myriad of issues and is available as a speaker, facilitator and campaign planner. A long-time voice for Portland's under-represented communities and a leader in the struggle against racial and economic injustice, Jo Ann was three times elected to the Oregon legislature and for many years Executive Director of Oregon Action. She’s been called on by the City of Portland to help re-write the City Charter and organizes those on the downside of power to pursue their interests from the local to the federal level. She is particularly committed to leadership development and in holding those in power accountable.

Join the conversation …

Join the conversation every Thursday morning from 8-9 a.m. by calling 503-231-8187. Keep the conversation going after the program at our blog at kboo.fm/voicesfromtheedge.

Engineering: Steve Nassar 

Hosted by

Episode Archive

The future of Occupy gathering in Sacramento on July 31 2014 w/Daniel Hong

Air date: 
Thu, 07/24/2014 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
Daniel Hong on Occupy gathering in Sacramento on July 31 2014

The Occupy movement is an international protest movement against social and economic inequality, its primary goal being to make the economic and political relations in all societies less vertically hierarchical and more flatly distributed. Local groups often have different focuses, but among the movement's prime concerns deal with how large corporations and the global financial system control the world in a way that disproportionately benefits a minority, undermines democracy, and is unstable. It is part of what Manfred Steger calls the "global justice movement". The first Occupy protest to receive widespread attention was Occupy Wall Street in New York City's Zuccotti Park, which began on 17 September 2011.

Update w/Latoya Harris & daughter, arrested at 9-yrs-old update show

Air date: 
Thu, 07/17/2014 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
Latoya Harris and daughter who was arrested at 9-yrs old by Portland police officers- update

On June 26 we first spoke with Latoya Harris who's daughter (9-years old at the time) was handcuffed at her home dressed only in a swimsuit - and days following a playground tiff that had long since been resolved. No case was ever brought, not by a DA, nor by our 'self-defeating police accountability system. I will speak with Latoya's and her daughter to update you on this ongoing story. Portland police Officer David McCarthy and Officer Matthew Huspek, who are assigned to a special police detail at New Columbia, have no business working with kids!

Discussion on City hall's latest community initiative to intervene on gang violence

Air date: 
Thu, 07/10/2014 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
Review of Mayor's & Police Chief's new gang intervention initiative-Police paid community not.

It's summer time in Portland so gangs must be on the rise, as per Chief Mike Reese, Portland Police Bureau.  Yesterday Multnomah County Local Public Safety Council released a 500 page report met to make us all afraid that gang activity in Multnomah County is running rampant.  I wish we could believe the source of this data but having reviewed the lopsided survey sent out to the public to support this notion its sole goal is to convince the community to volunteer to stop gang violence and pay the cops overtime for gang work.  It is the normal public-private partnership where the public law enforcement agencies get resources (up to $200,000 for enforcement activities vs the volunteer community support.

Urban League's Midge Purcell: Should everyone have a fair chance for a good job and stable housing?

Air date: 
Thu, 07/03/2014 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
Urban League's Midge Purcell: Should everyone have a fair chance for a good job and stable housing?

Guest host Dave Mazza speaks with Midge Purcell of the Urban League about their campaign to pass an ordinance to require employers and landlords to remove the box on applications asking about an applicant's previous arrest record or convictions. 

They ask if you believe that everyone should have a fair chance for a good job and stable housing?

Have you or someone you know faced job or housing discrimination because of a criminal record?

Ms. Latoya Harris and the arrest of her 9-year old daughter

Air date: 
Thu, 06/26/2014 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
Interview w/Latoya Harris on arrest of her 9-year old daughter & aggressive policing of youth

Portland police Officer David McCarthy and Officer Matthew Huspek, who are assigned to a special police detail at New Columbia, placed a 9-year-old girl in handcuffs last May and took her to police headquarters in downtown Portland to be fingerprinted and photographed in connection with an alleged assault against another girl at a local youth club, according to their police reports. 

Interview with Talilo Marfil

Air date: 
Thu, 06/12/2014 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
Interview with Talilo Marfil Homeless Youth Outreach Hip Hop, Houseless youth & police suppression

Join Talilo Marfil and I on Thursday morning for Voices from the Edge as we discuss Hip Hop in Portland and an upcoming Hip Hop Celebration for homeless youth at Pioneer Square. Talilo is an outreach worker with New Avenues for Youth who will discuss his job and why a positive Hip Hop event is so needed. We will discuss the aggressive policing presence and the recent use of the Fire Marshall, excessive police presence and pat downs are used to intimidate black youth who attend. Is Hip Hop illegal in Portland? What can the rest of us do to support our youth in positive activities this summer? Join us from 8-9AM as we dive into this topic. For more information on the upcoming event please follow the Facebook link below.

Camron Doss, District Director interview on U.S. Small Business Association

Air date: 
Thu, 05/22/2014 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
Camron Doss, District Director, U.S. Small Business Administration interview on U.S. Small Business

Join Camron & I tomorrow morning for Voices from the Edge. With many segments of our community shut out of the job market many are turning to starting their own business. Small businesses help drive Portland’s economy in a big way. 95 percent of businesses in Portland employ less than 50 people, and 76 percent employ less than 10. These small businesses deliver essential goods and services across the community. Here are some more big facts about our small businesses: -More than half of Americans own or work for a small business. -Small businesses create 2 out of every 3 new U.S. jobs. -98% of Portland’s neighborhood businesses have 5 or fewer employees. In honor of National Small Business Week I’ve invited Camron Doss, District Director, U.S.

Audio

Closing Portland's Affordable Housing Gap

program date: 
Wed, 06/24/2009

The real estate bubble may have burst but many Portlanders still find homeownership beyond their reach. Even with today's lower housing costs, affordable housing for a family earning the median family income ($66,900) would be priced at $200,000 - a price limited to very few homes currently available, and even fewer at that price with the space available for a family of four. For low income families earning less than 60 percent of the median family income, the opportunities are nearly non-existent. Is it important to make home ownership available? How do we close the affordable housing gap in Portland?

Jo Ann and Dave talk with Lila Alvarez, Community Relations Coordinator for the Portland Community Land Trust, about how affordable housing - or lack of it - affects the community and what strategies her organization has adopted to put home ownership within reach of more Portlanders.

The conversation doesn't end when the program does. You can join in additional discussion of the week's issue on our blog at kboo.fm/voicesfromtheedge (click on the "blog" tab). You'll find additional information, important links, comments from other listeners and commentary from Jo Ann and Dave. Have a question for our guests, but can't call in during the program? Post your questions on line so we can make them a part of the Voices discussion.

A "Juneteenth" rememberance: confronting racism in Oregon

program date: 
Wed, 06/17/2009

June 19th marks the 144th anniversary of the landing of federal troops in Galveston, Texas to enforce the Emancipation Proclamation and finally bring slavery to an end throughout the United States. "Juneteenth" has not only become a day to commemorate the end of slavery but to reflect on the African American experience - from progress made to challenges that remain. As Oregonians celebrate the 150th anniversary of their statehood, Juneteenth is an opportunity to look at how we are contributing - or not - to overcoming racism in Oregon.

Jo Ann and Dave talk with Sha'an Mouliert, a community activist, educator and co-founder of the African American Alliance of the Northeast Kingdom (Vermont). Mouliert conducts workshops on racism that help people recognize and dismantle white privilege. Mouliert is conducting workshops in Portland on June 20 through the Womens International League of Peace and Freedom. Dave and Jo Ann will also be talking with Labor Commissioner Brad Avakian about new efforts by the Bureau of Labor and Industry to combat racism and other forms of discrimination in Oregon. Should our focus be on the personal level, on better policies or all of the above? On this Juneteenth, what do you think calls for celebration and what calls for greater efforts on our part? Let us know what you think by joining the conversation this Thursday at 8 am on Voices from the Edge.

The conversation doesn't end when the program does. You can join in additional discussion of the week's issue on our blog at kboo.fm/voicesfromtheedge (click on the "blog" tab). You'll find additional information, important links, comments from other listeners and commentary from Jo Ann and Dave. Have a question for our guests, but can't call in during the program? Post your questions on line so we can make them a part of the Voices discussion.

What do Lents residents really think of Randy Leonard's baseball stadium deal?

program date: 
Wed, 06/10/2009

At last month's meeting of the Lents Neighborhood Association, Portland City Commissioner Randy Leonard told a less than enthusiastic audience that "Having a Triple A baseball stadium would be the best thing we could ever have happen in Lents." While criticism of the stadium deal grows - including official rejection by the Portland Parks Board - Leonard remains unmoved in his belief that "downtown" interests, not neighborhood residents, are behind the opposition.

But what do the residents of Lents really think? The Lents deal has triggered deep-seated concerns about livability, affordable housing, economic development, historic preservation and how much voice citizens have with City Hall. Dave Mazza talks with Lents residents Kathleen Juergens de Ponce and Nick Christensen, organizers of Friends of Lents Park, about what their neighbors are concerned about and what they really think about Randy Leonard's desire to play ball in Lents. He also talks with Damien Chakwin, chair of the Lents Neighborhood Association and a supporter of the stadium proposal. 

 

The conversation doesn't end when the program does. You can join in additional discussion of the week's issue on our blog at kboo.fm/voicesfromtheedge (click on the "blog" tab). You'll find additional information, important links, comments from other listeners and commentary from Jo Ann and Dave. Have a question for our guests, but can't call in during the program? Post your questions on line so we can make them a part of the Voices discussion.

Dont' forget that KBOO Talk Radio can be heard every morning, Monday through Friday, from 8 to 9 am on 90.7 FM.

Is Portland's Village Building Convergence relevant in this economic crisis?

program date: 
Wed, 06/03/2009

The 9th annual Village Building Convergence starts in Portland on June 5. Coming together under the them "Powered by the People," Portlanders will work on projects ranging from water catchment systems and intersection painting to native plant gardening and cob benches. But with record job and home loss rocking the metropolitan area, is the convergence still relevant? Even in good times, how much community voice does the convergence really create? Dave Mazza talks with convergene co-coordinator and City Repair Project co-founder Mark Lakeman and Environmenal Sociology Professior Bruce Podobnik about the meaning of the convergence in good times and bad.

The conversation doesn't end when the program does. You can join in additional discussion of the week's issue on our blog at kboo.fm/voicesfromtheedge. You'll find additional information, important links, comments from other listeners and commentary from Jo Ann and Dave. Have a question for our guests, but can't call in during the program? Post your questions on line so we can make them a part of the Voices discussion. And don't forget that KBOO talk radio offers real conversation about real issues five days a week from 8 to 9 am on 90.7 FM.

Do we need a new civil rights unit? An inteview with Attorney General John Kroger

program date: 
Wed, 05/27/2009

John Kroger wants to be an activist attorney general. Since being sworn in, he’s taken on predatory lenders, challenged the LNG terminal, and headed up the investigation of Mayor Sam Adams. Now he’s asking lawmakers to fund a new civil rights unit so he can sue Oregon companies that break our state’s civil rights laws. His request comes as lawmakers in Salem are facing a growing budget crisis and considering major cuts in education, family services, public safety and other essential services. Can we afford Oregon Attorney General John Kroger's vision?

Dave talks with Oregon's top prosecutor about why we need a new civil rights division in the Oregon Department of Justice and what exactly it will do. Will this unit replace the work being done by the Bureau of Labor and Industry's civil rights division? Will the state pursue civil rights violations by other public agencies such as city police departments?

 The conversation doesn't end when the program does. You can join in additional discussion of the week's issue on our blog at kboo.fm/voicesfromtheedge (click on the "blog" tab). You'll find additional information, important links, comments from other listeners and commentary from Jo Ann and Dave. Have a question for our guests, but can't call in during the program? Post your questions on line so we can make them a part of the Voices discussion.

Race and Recession: An Interview with Seth Wessler

program date: 
Wed, 05/20/2009

The current recession is not an equal opportunity crisis. People of color are experiencing job loss, foreclosures and lack of healthcare at alarmingly higher rates than white Americans. These disparities are not a coincidence but rather the result of structural barriers that have been taking a toll on people of color long before the subprime meltdown.

Seth Wessler, an analyst with Applied Research Center, believes the same structural causes of racial disparity are also at the root of an economic crisis affecting all Americans. In his recently released Race and Recession: How Inequity Rigged the Economy and How to Change the Rules, Wessler presents the numbers as well as the personal stories that reveal the root causes of racial inequity and proposes the path to an inclusive recovery. Jo Ann and Dave talk with Wessler about his findings and recommendations.

The conversation doesn't end when the program does. You can join in additional discussion of the week's issue on our blog at kboo.fm/voicesfromtheedge (click on the "blog" tab). You'll find additional information, important links, comments from other listeners and commentary from Jo Ann and Dave. Have a question for our guests, but can't call in during the program? Post your questions on line so we can make them a part of the Voices discussion.

And don't forget that Voices from the Edge is part of KBOO's Talk Radio mornings - real issues and real talk five days a week from 8 to 9 am.

Race and Obama's First 100 Days

program date: 
Wed, 05/06/2009

Last week, President Obama reached his first 100 days in office, triggering a media flurry of speculation about how well he's doing. Communities of color - already hurting before the lastest round of troubles - have been measuring up the new president as well. Is President Obama pushing to create justice for all or is he too bogged down in the legacy of his predecessor? What should we be doing to push the president down the path of racial equity?

Dave Mazza talks with Rinku Sen, president and executive director of Applied Research Center, about her organization's assessment of Obama's first 100 days as well as what activists are doing across the nation to build racial justice as we rebuild the nation's economic, political and social fabric. Sen has written extensively about immigration, community organizing and women's lives for The Huffington Post, The Nation and ColorLines magazine, and is the author of Stir It Up: Lessons in Community Organizing and her latest book, The Accidental American: Immigration and Citizenship in the Age of Globalization.

May Day: Is it still relevant 123 years later?

program date: 
Wed, 04/29/2009

May 1, 2009 marks the 123rd anniversary of a rally for the eight-hour day in Chicago's Haymarket Square that ended with a police riot that left over a dozen dead. The political trial and hanging of four anarchists that followed sparked protests around the world and the designation by the Second International of May 1 as International Workers' Day, more commonly known as May Day. But does commemoration of a 19th century incident have relevance for people in the 21st century? Does demonstrating on May Day have meaning for you?

Jo Ann and Dave explore the relevance of May Day for communities in Oregon as well as around the world. They're joined by Andrea Townsend, an organizer with Portland Jobs with Justice, to talk about May Day's meaning to local struggles for economic and social justice as well as about the rally and march planned in downtown Portland sponsored by her organization.

Rethinking Ballot Measure 11

program date: 
Wed, 04/22/2009

As Oregon's economy continues to decline, lawmakers are faced with a growing budget gap and spiraling prisons costs driven by state mandatory sentencing laws. Some in the legislature say its time to revise state sentencing programs and find more efficient ways to handle convicted offenders. Among the proposals working their way through the legislative process is a bill that would allow judges to review mandatory sentences at mid-point and revise them if deemed appropriate. Dave and Jo Ann talk with Rep. Chip Shields about this proposed bill and other changes lawmakers are considering this session.

Creating accountable immigration enforcement

program date: 
Wed, 04/15/2009

Over 440,000 people will be detained by the U.S. government this year. Women, children, the elderly, asylum seekers, torture victims and even long-time permanent residents will be detained for months - in some cases years - awaiting a determination on their status. Many of these people will be detained without a judicial hearing or access to an attorney in a nation that prides itself on the rule of law and due process. Will the Obama adminstration create real immigration reform to ensure the people who come to our shores are treated fairly? What is happening at the grassroots to make this happen?

Dave talks with Jacqueline Esposito, the policy coordinator at Detention Watch Network, about a recent "national week of action" to spotlight the need for greater accountability at the Department of Homeland Security and demand due process and fundamental human rights be respected in immigration enforcement and detention practices. He is also joined by Amy Dudley, an organizer with Rural Organizing Project, who talks about what's happening in Oregon to bring about humane immigration reform.

Comments

Foreclosure Mills

I just wanted to post a link to an article about the foreclosure mills that make money off of the forsclosure mess.  http://motherjones.com/politics/2010/07/david-stern-djsp-foreclosure-fannie-freddie?page=1

taxing "gross" income?

can you clarify?

don't the measures increase rates on taxable income, not gross income, as the first caller mentioned? 

Still waiting for my apology from Joann

Dear Ms. Bowman,

I did not hear an apology for you making a blatant distortion of my comment.  I do not appreciate being lied about and especially by a campaign which you obviously are supporting which hypocritically poses as the moral arbitrator of the Universe regarding truth telling.

Again, let me clarify:

First off, I did not say, as was falsely stated by you and your guest, that politicians have a right to lie.  I stated that everyone has a right to lie about their love life.  That is a vastly different point and I bitterly resent being lied about on this.

This distortion (lie) by your guest and you is sadly emblematic of the hyperbolic nature of this entire pesudo-moralistic campaign.

I will receive your apology before I ever again associate with you or this program.

Sinverely,

Will Ware

It

Lying about lying on the Edge

I don't know how to get an email to the disc jockey.

Will again and please correct your slander of me and misstatement of my comment.

First off, I did not say, as was falsely stated by JoAnn and your caller, that politicians have a right to lie.  I stated that everyone has a right to lie about their love life.  That is a vastly different point and I bitterly resent being lied about on this.

This distortion (lie) by your guest and JoAnn is emblematic of the hyperbolic nature of this entire pesudo-moralistic campaign.

It is a fact that Republicans involved in this are using this as an organizing tool.  It is a fact that this campaign is making common-cause with anti-progressive forces.

It is this campaign that is the divisive force in our community.

This signature campaign is the darling of the right wing.  This campaign is the best thing that has happened to the Multnomah Co. Republican Party since Theodore Roosevelt.

If this is about negative campaigning- WHY IS THIS SUCH A THOROUGLY NEGATIVE CAMPGAIGN.  IT REDUCES POLITICAL DIALOG TO THE LEVEL OF A GRAMMER SCHOOL PLAYGROUND.

 

Cops and Race

Very interesting program today (8/6/09). Here's a germane link to an article by Kevin Alexander Gray in The Progressive "Citizens have the right to talk back to the police":

http://www.progressive.org/mpgray080409.html

In my view, a well trained cop could have and should have defused the situation far short of arrest.

Too frequently, cops escalate situations, especially when dealing with people of color.

As Mr. Alexander sums up in the final sentence of his article: "We should never have to fear when we stand up for our rights." And that goes for people of all hues.

Citizens have the right to talk back ...

I agree, Peter. This article is germane: One outcome of Professor Gate’s arrest should be an understanding that “What lends legitimacy (to our legal system) is our belief that the police are dutiful servants of the people — not their arbitrary oppressors.”

The Declaration of Independence promptly asserts “… Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just Powers from the consent of the governed.”

'Know Your Rights' training is imperative, as a 'check and balance' against unwarranted interference with the intent of the U.S. Constitution. An informed citizenry is a Public Good. Vigilance against abuse of power is actually a civic responsibility.

I know first-hand a tendency by Portland police to escalate situations that might be otherwise resolved. I have only an inkling of the mental pressures involved in policing, and but a dim suspicion as to the social handicaps that come with wielding weapons, spending so much time in the milieu of antisocial behavior, of having a community grant your uniformed subgroup status as The Enforcers. I would suspect such pressure, status and lethal equipment make it difficult to appreciate a role of Servant of the People.

Do you know what the common ground may be?

Law enforcement.

How can we change our dialogue so that a person of color, being thrown up against chain link fence – sometimes even without a pretext of wrongdoing – has standing when there is no probable cause that a crime is being committed?

By advocating that police actions adhere to Constitutional provisions for freedom from unwarranted search, to be secure in their possessions; would not this citizen also be involved in law enforcement?

One really ironic point I failed to make on the program is that, from the time of Chief Kroeker onward, it has likely been in the consciousness of Portland Police Bureau command that racial profiling actually inhibits criminal detection and prosecution. Simply the perception of police misconduct reduces the quality of public cooperation. One of the results of racial bias is that it is more difficult to secure leads and eventual witness testimony from a disenfranchised, victimized population of law-abiding citizens.

I suggest there will be a real reduction in crime (due to citizen cooperation) when and if policing is seen to be done lawfully. If it were a shared perception that people who oppose the immoral, unethical and illegal practice of racial profiling had merit as Constitutional law enforcers, I would think this a positive dynamic … and not just for people of color, but other negatively affected groups like the mentally ill, for whom self-advocacy is a supreme challenge.

Let us fuse training and dialogue. You mention the ‘well-trained cop.’ Perhaps ‘Know Your Rights’ training (and Oregon Action training includes de-escalation strategies) might dovetail with Portland Police Bureau training. What would be achieved if police training alerted officers that a segment of the population - fatigued by unconstitutional behavior - will be advocating for just and equitable treatment?

If that segment of the population included Police Commissioner Saltzman, Human Rights Commissioner Fritz, City Auditor Griffin-Valade and Mayor Adams, I think the Police union would find impetus to engage in negotiations for a means to weed out officers refusing to enforce the Constitution, state law, or bureau regulations.

To take up your point about police as public servants, the Auditor’s Independent Police Review Board is poised to actually adopt that frame of reference. Currently specializing in facts and figures, there is a component of their reporting primed and ready for public pressure to make this a prime frame of reference for assessing the Police Bureau’s functionality.

Perhaps better left for another blog, I just want you to know that civilian oversight of armed government activity is imperative as the nation pursues a War on Terror. If the City of Portland were to weigh in on fundamental human rights during the nation’s general expansion of police powers, it stands likely to do a Public Good that cannot now be calculated.

Environment: global warming

On this morning's (June 18) program Joann mentioned a man (I think she said "young" and "minority" )who is becomming active in environmental matters, I would like to talk with him about joining the planning and implementation of an event that is scheduled to take place on October 24th.

I am a member ot the Peace and Social Concerns Committee of the Multnomah Monthly Meeting of Friends (Quakers), and the organizer of a sub-group called "Global Coolers". We meet monthly and have taken the responsibility of informing the Meeting about global warming and involving them in efforts to lessen our individual and collective destructive impact on the planet.We have also hosted a couple of community events over the past several years.
Yesterday I learned that Bill McKibben, who is a leading activist in the environmental protection movement, is organizing a world-wide demonstration to take place on October 24: it is described on 350.org.
I want to make sure that Portland participates in this event.
I have not talked yet to other environmental activists about involvement (there may already be plans afoot) but I will do so in the next couple of days. In any case I will welcome all participants in the planning and execution of the event. My telephone number is 503-292-1817.
Thank you for your attention.
Peace, Jim

Measure 53

I was disturbed to hear this morning information that leads me to think I did not check out the ballot measures carefully enough. As an intelligent conservative, I find it both important and difficult to listen to KBOO and other left-of-center sources regularly, and the comments this morning made it clear that I should invest more energy into that effort.

On the other hand, I was a bit amused (and relieved of my nascent guilt) when I heard you adamantly insist that Measure 53 passed by a 76-24 margin because a day-old paper said so. It is possible that the Oregonian was that far off the mark - if so, I would assume that it was an early edition which showed very preliminary results. I went to three sources this morning of which two gave vote tallies. KATU.com indicates that as of 8am today the vote on 53 was YES 475,838 and NO 473,912 which is a margin of less than 2000 votes out of nearly 1 million. Rounded to the nearest percent, the vote is 50-50. KOIN.com had very similar (probably identical) numbers.

So I figure that if you let your personal opinions cloud such simple and easily ascertained facts, if you are so closed-minded that you will not double-check this when it is disputed, I need not concern myself with your judgment on the more complex issue of Measure 53 itself.

- Gordon

 

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