Voices from the Edge

About the program …

Community dialogue is important. At 8am every Thursday Voices from the Edge lends a KBOO microphone to informed guests you might not hear anywhere else. With an hour to invest, the call-in format engages listeners in meaningful conversations about crucial issues like racial disparity, government accountability, environmental justice and politics on local, state and national levels. Join lively discussions about concerns that are important to you and our community. Together we’ll make Oregon and our nation a better place for a larger number of those living here.

About the host

Jo Ann Hardesty is Principal Partner at Consult Hardesty. She serves as a subject matter expert on a myriad of issues and is available as a speaker, facilitator and campaign planner. A long-time voice for Portland's under-represented communities and a leader in the struggle against racial and economic injustice, Jo Ann was three times elected to the Oregon legislature and for many years Executive Director of Oregon Action. She’s been called on by the City of Portland to help re-write the City Charter and organizes those on the downside of power to pursue their interests from the local to the federal level. She is particularly committed to leadership development and in holding those in power accountable.

Join the conversation …

Join the conversation every Thursday morning from 8-9 a.m. by calling 503-231-8187. Keep the conversation going after the program at our blog at kboo.fm/voicesfromtheedge.

Engineering: Steve Nassar 

Coming Soon

Investigative Reporter Greg Palast Returns
 

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Episode Archive

Voices from the Edge on 05/13/10

Air date: 
Thu, 05/13/2010 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
Is Multnomah County uniquely toxic for people of color?
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Is Multnomah County "uniquely toxic" for people of color?
 
A new report by Portland State University states that for people of color, Multnomah County is a "uniquely toxic" place when it comes to education, income, home ownership and health.

Voices from the Edge on 04/29/10

Air date: 
Thu, 04/29/2010 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
Clergy Abuse: Can we hold the abusers accountable and heal the community?
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Clergy Abuse: Can we hold the abusers accountable and heal the community?
 
Revelations earlier this month implicating Pope Benedict XVI in cover-ups of clergy abuse in Europe are just the latest developments in an issue that is rocking religious institutions to their foundations.

Voices from the Edge on 04/15/10

Air date: 
Thu, 04/15/2010 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
Near deadly error: An interview with exonerated death row inmate Juan Melendez-Colon
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Near-Deadly Error: An interview with exonerated death row inmate Juan Melendez-Colon
 
It is hard to imagine spending over 17 years on death row for a crime you did not commit. Juan Melendez-Colon did just that following his 1984 conviction and sentencing to death in the killing of Auburndale, FL beauty salon owner Delbert Baker.

Voices from the Edge on 04/08/10

Air date: 
Thu, 04/08/2010 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
What does peace mean to you? Oregon youth respond
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What does peace mean to you? Oregon youth respond
 
In world where we struggle with wars, injustice, violence in our communities and the threat of environmental devastation...what does peace mean to you. That was the question 186 students from around Oregon answered as part of the Greenfield Peace Writing Contest for Oregon High School Students.

Voices from the Edge on 03/25/10

Air date: 
Thu, 03/25/2010 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
Should we continue voter-owned elections? An interview with Common Cause's Janice Thompson

This fall, Portlanders will decide whether to continue their experiment with voter-owned elections. The question becomes more relevant in the wake of Citzens United vs. Federal Elections Commission, a recent Supreme Court ruling that removed bans on corporate campaign spending. This week, Jo Ann and Dave talk with Common Cause Oregon's Janice Thompson about the upcoming referendum on voter-owned elections and what else needs to be done to fix our ailing electoral process. 

Voices from the Edge on 03/18/10

Air date: 
Thu, 03/18/2010 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
Counting Heads: What's right and what's wrong with the 2010 census

Its been happening every decade since 1790. As mandated by the constitution, the U.S. Census Bureau determines the population of the nation, the results used to allocate congressional seats, electoral votes and government program funding. As census questionnaires start arriving in mailboxes this month, criticism of the census is heating up from all quarters. Right wing pundits characterize the census as part of the Obama administration's efforts to control citizens' lives. Republicans accuse organization like ACORN of distorting the results for political gain. Communities of color and other underrepresented populations worry that historic undercounting of their numbers will once again leave them without real political representation.

Voices from the Edge on 03/11/10

Air date: 
Thu, 03/11/2010 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
What does Ted Wheeler's departure mean for Multnomah County

The appointment of Multnomah County Chair Ted Wheeler as state treasurer last Tuesday churned county and state political waters this week. Wheeler, appointed by Governor Kulongoski to fill the vacancy created by State Treasurer Ben Westlund's death, is now better positioned to advance up the ladder of statewide offices. At the county level, meanwhile, his departure has set off a scramble for his and County Commissioner Jeff Cogen's seat - Cogen throwing his hat in the ring to be the county's top executive. What will Wheeler's departure mean for residents of Oregon's most populous county? Jo Ann and Dave look at what's ahead for the candidates and county residents.

Voices from the Edge on 03/04/10

Air date: 
Thu, 03/04/2010 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
Turning community outrage into real police reform: A conversation with the Albina Ministerial Allian

One month after Portland police officer Ronald Frashour fatally shot Aaron Campbell, the Portland City Council is still struggling with growing community anger over the unarmed man's death. Demonstrations, a high profile visit by Rev. Jesse Jackson - as well as an upcoming March 14 visit by national civil rights activist Rev.

Voices from the Edge on 02/25/10

Air date: 
Thu, 02/25/2010 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
Corporate personhood and the campaign to legalize democracy

 

On January 21, 2010, the U.S. Supreme court took another step in the long - and many say misguided - journey to granting corporations personhood under the U.S. Constitution. In Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, a five-member majority of the court increased the ability of corporations to use their wealth to influence our electoral process.

Voices from the Edge on 02/18/10

Air date: 
Thu, 02/18/2010 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
What's next in the Aaron Campbell case? Also, an interview with Oregon Attorney General John Kroger

What's next in the Aaron Campbell case? Also, an interview with Oregon Attorney General John Kroger

Tuesday night, Rev. Jesse Jackson spoke to over 1,000 Portlanders at Maranantha Church about the "execution" of Aaron Campbell, the most recent victim of a police shooting.

Audio

Voices from the Edge on 05-24-12 Whose urban renewal?

program date: 
Thu, 05/24/2012

Whose urban renewal? A look at the mayor's education urban renewal area.

Last week the Portland City Council approved the Portland Development Commission's Education Urban Renewal Plan "focused on expanding Portland State University as a leading engine of economic growth, prosperity and opportunity." The new urban renewal area will generate up to $169 million for investment in research facilities, "business accelerators," affordable housing and private development. The mayor sees the funds, which come from the property taxes collected in the area, as a strategic investment for the city.

But not everyone sees the creative use of the urban renewal process in the same positive light as the mayor. Among those voices concerns is the League of Women Voters of Portland who question how expansion of the university meets the "blight test" required by Oregon's Urban Renewal Law. The League is also concerned over the lack of details of exactly how these millions of tax dollars are to be spent. They are not alone. Other critics question how this investment can raise the overall tax base of the area - another requirement of the process - when the dollars are going to the expansion of a public university that is largely tax exempt?

This week, Jo Ann and Dave are joined by Debbie Aiona and Shelley Lorenzen of the League of Women Voters of Portland's Action Committee to discuss their concerns for the plan and what can be done to rein in the council's use of Oregon's Urban Renewal Law.

Jo Ann Hardesty is a former state legislator, former director of Oregon Action and past board president of Portland Community Media, as well as a long-time leader in the struggle for racial and economic justice. Dave Mazza is a journalist and former editor of The Portland Alliance who has covered and been involved in Portland's civil rights, environmental, labor and peace movements for over 20 years.

Join Jo Ann and Dave every Thursday as they bring you guests and conversations on issues that are important to you. Support Voices from the Edge by becoming a KBOO member (just click the "tip jar" in the upper right-hand corner on KBOO's homepage to find out how) or consider becoming an underwriter of this program (contact KBOO's underwriting director for details).

Co-Hosts: Jo Ann Hardesty and Dave Mazza

Producers: Dave Mazza and Jo Ann Hardesty

Program Engineer: Steve Nassar

Audio Editor: Alicia Olson

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  • Title: VFE 05-24-12
  • Genre: Other
  • Year: 2012
  • Length: 57:53 minutes (52.99 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Daniel Suelo, the man who quit money

program date: 
Thu, 05/17/2012

Twelve years ago, Daniel Suelo left his life savings - thirty dollars - inside a phone booth and walked away. Since then, he has lived - to all appearances sanely and even joyfully - without money, credit, barter, or government support, fulfilling what he sees as a vision of the good life inspired by the teachings of Jesus, the Buddha and others. Suelo sees his path as one that has allowed him to live an engaged life on the personal, social and spiritual level. What does his experience tell us about modern American life?

This week, Jo Ann and Dave talk Daniel Suelo and with Mark Sundeen, the writer who has chronicled Suelo's experiences in The Man Who Quit Money. Bill McKibben, author of Deep Economy says "... Daniel's story seems to offer some broader clues for all of us?" Is this level of withdrawal a solution to modern Americans' sense of alienation or an escape from the tougher challenge of being engaged with the world as it is?

Jo Ann Hardesty is a former state legislator, former director of Oregon Action and past board president of Portland Community Media, as well as a long-time leader in the struggle for racial and economic justice. Dave Mazza is a journalist and former editor of The Portland Alliance who has covered and been involved in Portland's civil rights, environmental, labor and peace movements for over 20 years.

Join Jo Ann and Dave every Thursday as they bring you guests and conversations on issues that are important to you. Support Voices from the Edge by becoming a KBOO member (just click the "tip jar" in the upper right-hand corner on KBOO's homepage to find out how) or consider becoming an underwriter of this program (contact KBOO's underwriting director for details).

Co-Hosts: Jo Ann Hardesty and Dave Mazza

Producers: Dave Mazza and Jo Ann Hardesty

Program Engineer: Steve Nassar

Audio Editor: Alicia Olson

  • Length: 33:33 minutes (30.71 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Voices from the Edge on 05-10-12 Occupying the economy with Richard D. Wolff

program date: 
Thu, 05/10/2012

Occupying the economy with Richard D. Wolff

Three years into the government's announced recovery, working Americans find themselves poorer than when the recovery began. While the greatest economic crisis since the Great Depression has exposed corrupt bankers, unregulated speculators and a government willing to serve the interests of the one percent regardless the cost, the wealthy continue to prosper. Economist Richard D. Wolff credits the occupy movement with exposing these symptoms of capitalism but believes we must go deeper to resolve the decades-old causes of the crisis, reaching back to the 1970s when a century-old pattern of rising wages for workers ended.

This week, Jo Ann and Dave talk with Dr. Wolff about the deep-rooted causes underlying the current crisis, how those cause have made economic injustice chronic and how we build on the occupy movement's initial steps to create a better future. Dr. Wolff is Professor of Economics Emeritus, University of Massachusetts, Amherst and regularly teaches at the Brecht Forum in Manhattan. His most recent published work is Occupy the Economy: Challenging Capitalism which he co-authored with David Barsamian.

Jo Ann Hardesty is a former state legislator, former director of Oregon Action and past board president of Portland Community Media, as well as a long-time leader in the struggle for racial and economic justice. Dave Mazza is a journalist and former editor of The Portland Alliance who has covered and been involved in Portland's civil rights, environmental, labor and peace movements for over 20 years.

Join Jo Ann and Dave every Thursday as they bring you guests and conversations on issues that are important to you. Support Voices from the Edge by becoming a KBOO member (just click the "tip jar" in the upper right-hand corner on KBOO's homepage to find out how) or consider becoming an underwriter of this program (contact KBOO's underwriting director for details).

Co-Hosts: Jo Ann Hardesty and Dave Mazza

Producers: Dave Mazza and Jo Ann Hardesty

Program Engineer: Steve Nassar

Audio Editor: Alicia Olson

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  • Title: VFE 05-10-12
  • Genre: Other
  • Year: 2012
  • Length: 57:56 minutes (53.04 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Voices from the Edge on 05-03-12 Blowing the lid off BP and other corporate criminals with Greg Palast

program date: 
Thu, 05/03/2012

Blowing the lid off BP and other corporate criminals with Greg Palast

Last month, award-winning investigative journalist Greg Palast uncovered new evidence of a corporate-government cover-up in the 2010 BP Deepwater Horizon blowout that destroyed lives and the environment in the Gulf of Mexico. In an investigation that includes travel to - and deportation from - the Islamic republic of Azerbaijan, Palast and his team uncovered evidence of a 2008 blowout of a BP Caspian Sea rig from the use of the same faulty cement cap that led to the Gulf disaster. Even more disturbing is Palast's discovery of evidence implicating BP, Chevron, Exxon and the Bush State Department in a cover-up of the Caspian Sea disaster. Waterkeeper Alliance attorney Robert F. Kennedy Jr. called the concealment "criminal," noting "we have laws that make it illegal to hide this."

This week, Jo Ann and Dave are joined by Greg Palast in a conversation about the cover-up and the incestuous relationship between corporate lobbyists and government which made covering up this criminal behavior possible. Greg will also talk about what changes are or aren't happening in the political landscape as the 2012 presidential race shapes up. Join us in this special conversation with Greg Palast as we kick off KBOO's spring membership drive.  

Jo Ann Hardesty is a former state legislator, former director of Oregon Action and past board president of Portland Community Media, as well as a long-time leader in the struggle for racial and economic justice. Dave Mazza is a journalist and former editor of The Portland Alliance who has covered and been involved in Portland's civil rights, environmental, labor and peace movements for over 20 years.

Join Jo Ann and Dave every Thursday as they bring you guests and conversations on issues that are important to you. Support Voices from the Edge by becoming a KBOO member (just click the "tip jar" in the upper right-hand corner on KBOO's homepage to find out how) or consider becoming an underwriter of this program (contact KBOO's underwriting director for details).

Co-Hosts: Jo Ann Hardesty and Dave Mazza

Producers: Dave Mazza and Jo Ann Hardesty

Program Engineer: Steve Nassar

Audio Editor: Alicia Olson

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  • Title: VFE 05-03-12
  • Genre: Other
  • Year: 2012
  • Length: 58:15 minutes (53.33 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Voices from the Edge on 04-26-12 Finding justice in the Portland Harbor cleanup w/ Guest James Posey

Categories:
program date: 
Thu, 04/26/2012

Finding justice in the Portland Harbor cleanup

Portland Harbor is the heavily industrialized portion of the Willamette River running north of downtown to Kelly's Point. Since it was listed as a Superfund site in 2000, cleaning up the toxins - ranging from heavy metals to pesticides - has been a source of contention between the city, state, industry and citizen groups. Now a "Portland Harbor Partnership" composed of government and industry representatives is moving towards a final plan for cleanup and future use of the area. What will be the effect of the cleanup and redevelopment of Portland Harbor on neighboring communities of color? Will the transformation of Portland Harbor offer economic and social opportunities for those communities or create more exclusive, upscale developments?

This week, Jo Ann and Dave talk with local businessman James Posey, past president of the National Association of Minority Contractors Oregon. They'll explore the potential of the cleanup to address the economic disparities still facing black and other minority businesses of color. Do we find justice in the cleanup process or do we follow the same old formula? Join us in this important conversation.

Jo Ann Hardesty is a former state legislator, former director of Oregon Action and past board president of Portland Community Media, as well as a long-time leader in the struggle for racial and economic justice. Dave Mazza is a journalist and former editor of The Portland Alliance who has covered and been involved in Portland's civil rights, environmental, labor and peace movements for over 20 years.

Join Jo Ann and Dave every Thursday as they bring you guests and conversations on issues that are important to you. Support Voices from the Edge by becoming a KBOO member (just click the "tip jar" in the upper right-hand corner on KBOO's homepage to find out how) or consider becoming an underwriter of this program (contact KBOO's underwriting director for details).

Co-Hosts: Jo Ann Hardesty and Dave Mazza

Producers: Dave Mazza and Jo Ann Hardesty

Program Engineer: Steve Nassar

Audio Editor: Alicia Olson

  • Title: VFE 04-26-12
  • Genre: Other
  • Year: 2012
  • Length: 56:43 minutes (51.93 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Voices from the Edge on 04-19-12 Sexual assault and homeless women

program date: 
Thu, 04/19/2012

Sexual assault and homeless women: Addressing an ignored link

Women in an abusive relationship are often forced to choose between abuse at home or life on the streets. Demand far outstrips the supply of affordable housing or shelter space. A 2006 U.S. Conference of Mayors report found that 29 percent of shelter requests by homeless families were denied due to lack of resources. The link between domestic violence and homelessness is well documented. A recent study in Massachusetts found that 92 percent of homeless women had experience severe physical or sexual assault at some point in their life. San Diego's Regional Task Force on the Homeless found that 50 percent of homeless women are domestic violence victims. While the problem continues to grow, many lawmakers are pushing for reduced funding for what resources currently exist for battered women.

This week, Jo Ann and Dave talk with Doreen Binder, Executive Director of Transitions Project, and Jessie Mindlin and Laura Mahr, attorneys at the Victims' Rights Law Center about what is being done nationally and in Oregon to address the problem. Binder, Mindlin and Mahr recently presented at the World Conference of Women's Shelters on this issue.

Jo Ann Hardesty is a former state legislator, former director of Oregon Action and past board president of Portland Community Media, as well as a long-time leader in the struggle for racial and economic justice. Dave Mazza is a journalist and former editor of The Portland Alliance who has covered and been involved in Portland's civil rights, environmental, labor and peace movements for over 20 years.

Join Jo Ann and Dave every Thursday as they bring you guests and conversations on issues that are important to you. Support Voices from the Edge by becoming a KBOO member (just click the "tip jar" in the upper right-hand corner on KBOO's homepage to find out how) or consider becoming an underwriter of this program (contact KBOO's underwriting director for details).

Co-Hosts: Jo Ann Hardesty and Dave Mazza

Producers: Dave Mazza and Jo Ann Hardesty

Program Engineer: Steve Nassar

Audio Editor: Alicia Olson

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  • Title: VFE 04-19-12
  • Genre: Other
  • Year: 2012
  • Length: 57:39 minutes (52.79 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Voices from the Edge on 04-12-12 Ending unjust deportations

program date: 
Thu, 04/12/2012

Ending unjust deportations

Most news stories of ICE raids on undocumented immigrants end with a headcount of people caught in the government's net. What's not seen on the evening news is the impact on communities where deportations tear families apart and create an environment of insecurity for those left behind. As deportations continue to occur in the Portland area, local communities are coming together to understand the issues driving these federal policies and to find solutions that are just and create true security.

This week, Jo Ann and Dave are joined by Professor Rene Sanchez of the University of Portland and Aeryca Steinbauer of Causa Oregon to explore the moral, legal and political elements of this issue. Professor Sanchez and Ms. Steinbauer are organizers of Insecure Communities: A Community Forum on Ending Unjust Deportation taking place on Friday, April 13 at First Unitarian Church.

Jo Ann Hardesty is a former state legislator, former director of Oregon Action and past board president of Portland Community Media, as well as a long-time leader in the struggle for racial and economic justice. Dave Mazza is a journalist and former editor of The Portland Alliance who has covered and been involved in Portland's civil rights, environmental, labor and peace movements for over 20 years.

Join Jo Ann and Dave every Thursday as they bring you guests and conversations on issues that are important to you. Support Voices from the Edge by becoming a KBOO member (just click the "tip jar" in the upper right-hand corner on KBOO's homepage to find out how) or consider becoming an underwriter of this program (contact KBOO's underwriting director for details).

Co-Hosts: Jo Ann Hardesty and Dave Mazza

Producers: Dave Mazza and Jo Ann Hardesty

Program Engineer: Steve Nassar

Audio Editor: Alicia Olson

Friend us on Facebook!

  • Title: VFE 04-12-12
  • Genre: Other
  • Year: 2012
  • Length: 54:53 minutes (50.25 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Voices from the Edge on 04-05-12 Official violence against African American men

program date: 
Thu, 04/05/2012

Campbell, Martin, Brisette and Madison: Official violence against African American men

The Portland police officer who fatally shot Aaron Campbell was recently reinstated. Florida's State Attorney is being investigated for interference in the police investigation of the shooting death of Trayvon Martin by a neighborhood watch volunteer. Seven years after James Brissette and Ronald Madison were fatally shot by police officers from New Orlean's Danziger Bridge, the officers who pulled the triggers as well as those who covered up the killings have finally been convicted for their crimes. Different circumstances, different locations, but all three are connected by some form of official sanctioning of violence against African American men.

This week, Jo Ann and Dave will look more closely at these cases, the obstacles to achieving justice for the victims and what it says about the race and law enforcement in 2012.

Jo Ann Hardesty is a former state legislator, former director of Oregon Action and past board president of Portland Community Media, as well as a long-time leader in the struggle for racial and economic justice. Dave Mazza is a journalist and former editor of The Portland Alliance who has covered and been involved in Portland's civil rights, environmental, labor and peace movements for over 20 years.

Join Jo Ann and Dave every Thursday as they bring you guests and conversations on issues that are important to you. Support Voices from the Edge by becoming a KBOO member (just click the "tip jar" in the upper right-hand corner on KBOO's homepage to find out how) or consider becoming an underwriter of this program (contact KBOO's development director for details).

Co-Hosts: Jo Ann Hardesty and Dave Mazza

Producers: Dave Mazza and Jo Ann Hardesty

Program Engineer: Steve Nassar

Audio Editor: Alicia Olson

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  • Title: VFE 04-05-12
  • Genre: Rock
  • Year: 2012
  • Length: 45:10 minutes (41.35 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Voices from the Edge on 03-29-12 Young voices for peace: Winners of PSR's Greenfield Peace Writing Contest

program date: 
Thu, 03/29/2012

Young voices for peace: Winners of PSR's Greenfield Peace Writing Contest

As the United States enters a second decade of Asian wars and channels 22 percent of the nation's budget into military spending, finding new voices to speak out for peace may be the most important task facing peace activists. One of the ways Oregon Physicians for Social Responsibility (PSR) has taken on that task is their Greenfield Peace Writing Contest which encourages "the next generation of Oregon's leaders to consider their role in promoting peace."  This year's contest, starting with President Dwight Eisenhower's observation that "Every gun that is made, every warship launched, every rocket fired, signifies a theft form those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and not clothed," solicited essays, poems and stories from high school students that addressed the relationship between militarism and human needs. Five students who were selected from 57 entries from across the state will be honored at PSR's annual awards dinner on March 31.

This week, Jo Ann and Dave will be joined by four of the five honored: Alish Duff of West Linn High School; Alex Smith of Crescent Valley High School; Christine Trinh of De La Salle North Catholic High School; and Kelly Frank of Redmond High School. Also joining the conversation will be PSR's executive director, Kelly Campbell. 

Jo Ann Hardesty is a former state legislator, former director of Oregon Action and past board president of Portland Community Media, as well as a long-time leader in the struggle for racial and economic justice. Dave Mazza is a journalist and former editor of The Portland Alliance who has covered and been involved in Portland's civil rights, environmental, labor and peace movements for over 20 years.

Join Jo Ann and Dave every Thursday as they bring you guests and conversations on issues that are important to you. Support Voices from the Edge by becoming a KBOO member (just click the "tip jar" in the upper right-hand corner on KBOO's homepage to find out how) or consider becoming an underwriter of this program (contact KBOO's underwriting director for details).

Co-Hosts: Jo Ann Hardesty and Dave Mazza

Producers: Dave Mazza and Jo Ann Hardesty

Program Engineer: Steve Nassar

Audio Editor: Alicia Olson

Friend us on Facebook!

  • Title: VFE 03-29-12
  • Genre: Rock
  • Year: 2012
  • Length: 57:31 minutes (52.66 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Voices from the Edge on 03-22-12 What role should religion play in our politics?

program date: 
Thu, 03/22/2012

What role should religion play in our politics?

Judging by the statements made by presidential candidates and the media pundits providing minute-by-minute analysis of their comments, Americans want more religion in their politics. But a new poll by Pew Research indicates that a growing number of Americans are concerned about the degree to which politicians and the media have inserted religion into political discourse.

What role should religion play in our politics? The answer isn't easy. Despite the Pew findings, Americans continue to say that religion is an important part of their lives. Even in Oregon - which ranks 41st among states when considering religion's importance to its citizens - 46 percent of Oregonians see religion as essential to their lives. What does that mean for our politics? How do people bring important values into the public arena in a way that contributes to the greater good? Join us as we take a look at the Pew Research findings.

Jo Ann Hardesty is a former state legislator, former director of Oregon Action and past board president of Portland Community Media, as well as a long-time leader in the struggle for racial and economic justice. Dave Mazza is a journalist and former editor of The Portland Alliance who has covered and been involved in Portland's civil rights, environmental, labor and peace movements for over 20 years.

Join Jo Ann and Dave every Thursday as they bring you guests and conversations on issues that are important to you. Support Voices from the Edge by becoming a KBOO member (just click the "tip jar" in the upper right-hand corner on KBOO's homepage to find out how) or consider becoming an underwriter of this program (contact KBOO's development director for details).

Co-Hosts: Jo Ann Hardesty and Dave Mazza

Producers: Dave Mazza and Jo Ann Hardesty

Program Engineer: Steve Nassar

Audio Editor: Alicia Olson

Friend us on Facebook!

  • Title: VFE 03-22-12
  • Genre: Rock
  • Year: 2012
  • Length: 55:34 minutes (50.87 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Comments

Foreclosure Mills

I just wanted to post a link to an article about the foreclosure mills that make money off of the forsclosure mess.  http://motherjones.com/politics/2010/07/david-stern-djsp-foreclosure-fannie-freddie?page=1

taxing "gross" income?

can you clarify?

don't the measures increase rates on taxable income, not gross income, as the first caller mentioned? 

Still waiting for my apology from Joann

Dear Ms. Bowman,

I did not hear an apology for you making a blatant distortion of my comment.  I do not appreciate being lied about and especially by a campaign which you obviously are supporting which hypocritically poses as the moral arbitrator of the Universe regarding truth telling.

Again, let me clarify:

First off, I did not say, as was falsely stated by you and your guest, that politicians have a right to lie.  I stated that everyone has a right to lie about their love life.  That is a vastly different point and I bitterly resent being lied about on this.

This distortion (lie) by your guest and you is sadly emblematic of the hyperbolic nature of this entire pesudo-moralistic campaign.

I will receive your apology before I ever again associate with you or this program.

Sinverely,

Will Ware

It

Lying about lying on the Edge

I don't know how to get an email to the disc jockey.

Will again and please correct your slander of me and misstatement of my comment.

First off, I did not say, as was falsely stated by JoAnn and your caller, that politicians have a right to lie.  I stated that everyone has a right to lie about their love life.  That is a vastly different point and I bitterly resent being lied about on this.

This distortion (lie) by your guest and JoAnn is emblematic of the hyperbolic nature of this entire pesudo-moralistic campaign.

It is a fact that Republicans involved in this are using this as an organizing tool.  It is a fact that this campaign is making common-cause with anti-progressive forces.

It is this campaign that is the divisive force in our community.

This signature campaign is the darling of the right wing.  This campaign is the best thing that has happened to the Multnomah Co. Republican Party since Theodore Roosevelt.

If this is about negative campaigning- WHY IS THIS SUCH A THOROUGLY NEGATIVE CAMPGAIGN.  IT REDUCES POLITICAL DIALOG TO THE LEVEL OF A GRAMMER SCHOOL PLAYGROUND.

 

Cops and Race

Very interesting program today (8/6/09). Here's a germane link to an article by Kevin Alexander Gray in The Progressive "Citizens have the right to talk back to the police":

http://www.progressive.org/mpgray080409.html

In my view, a well trained cop could have and should have defused the situation far short of arrest.

Too frequently, cops escalate situations, especially when dealing with people of color.

As Mr. Alexander sums up in the final sentence of his article: "We should never have to fear when we stand up for our rights." And that goes for people of all hues.

Citizens have the right to talk back ...

I agree, Peter. This article is germane: One outcome of Professor Gate’s arrest should be an understanding that “What lends legitimacy (to our legal system) is our belief that the police are dutiful servants of the people — not their arbitrary oppressors.”

The Declaration of Independence promptly asserts “… Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just Powers from the consent of the governed.”

'Know Your Rights' training is imperative, as a 'check and balance' against unwarranted interference with the intent of the U.S. Constitution. An informed citizenry is a Public Good. Vigilance against abuse of power is actually a civic responsibility.

I know first-hand a tendency by Portland police to escalate situations that might be otherwise resolved. I have only an inkling of the mental pressures involved in policing, and but a dim suspicion as to the social handicaps that come with wielding weapons, spending so much time in the milieu of antisocial behavior, of having a community grant your uniformed subgroup status as The Enforcers. I would suspect such pressure, status and lethal equipment make it difficult to appreciate a role of Servant of the People.

Do you know what the common ground may be?

Law enforcement.

How can we change our dialogue so that a person of color, being thrown up against chain link fence – sometimes even without a pretext of wrongdoing – has standing when there is no probable cause that a crime is being committed?

By advocating that police actions adhere to Constitutional provisions for freedom from unwarranted search, to be secure in their possessions; would not this citizen also be involved in law enforcement?

One really ironic point I failed to make on the program is that, from the time of Chief Kroeker onward, it has likely been in the consciousness of Portland Police Bureau command that racial profiling actually inhibits criminal detection and prosecution. Simply the perception of police misconduct reduces the quality of public cooperation. One of the results of racial bias is that it is more difficult to secure leads and eventual witness testimony from a disenfranchised, victimized population of law-abiding citizens.

I suggest there will be a real reduction in crime (due to citizen cooperation) when and if policing is seen to be done lawfully. If it were a shared perception that people who oppose the immoral, unethical and illegal practice of racial profiling had merit as Constitutional law enforcers, I would think this a positive dynamic … and not just for people of color, but other negatively affected groups like the mentally ill, for whom self-advocacy is a supreme challenge.

Let us fuse training and dialogue. You mention the ‘well-trained cop.’ Perhaps ‘Know Your Rights’ training (and Oregon Action training includes de-escalation strategies) might dovetail with Portland Police Bureau training. What would be achieved if police training alerted officers that a segment of the population - fatigued by unconstitutional behavior - will be advocating for just and equitable treatment?

If that segment of the population included Police Commissioner Saltzman, Human Rights Commissioner Fritz, City Auditor Griffin-Valade and Mayor Adams, I think the Police union would find impetus to engage in negotiations for a means to weed out officers refusing to enforce the Constitution, state law, or bureau regulations.

To take up your point about police as public servants, the Auditor’s Independent Police Review Board is poised to actually adopt that frame of reference. Currently specializing in facts and figures, there is a component of their reporting primed and ready for public pressure to make this a prime frame of reference for assessing the Police Bureau’s functionality.

Perhaps better left for another blog, I just want you to know that civilian oversight of armed government activity is imperative as the nation pursues a War on Terror. If the City of Portland were to weigh in on fundamental human rights during the nation’s general expansion of police powers, it stands likely to do a Public Good that cannot now be calculated.

Environment: global warming

On this morning's (June 18) program Joann mentioned a man (I think she said "young" and "minority" )who is becomming active in environmental matters, I would like to talk with him about joining the planning and implementation of an event that is scheduled to take place on October 24th.

I am a member ot the Peace and Social Concerns Committee of the Multnomah Monthly Meeting of Friends (Quakers), and the organizer of a sub-group called "Global Coolers". We meet monthly and have taken the responsibility of informing the Meeting about global warming and involving them in efforts to lessen our individual and collective destructive impact on the planet.We have also hosted a couple of community events over the past several years.
Yesterday I learned that Bill McKibben, who is a leading activist in the environmental protection movement, is organizing a world-wide demonstration to take place on October 24: it is described on 350.org.
I want to make sure that Portland participates in this event.
I have not talked yet to other environmental activists about involvement (there may already be plans afoot) but I will do so in the next couple of days. In any case I will welcome all participants in the planning and execution of the event. My telephone number is 503-292-1817.
Thank you for your attention.
Peace, Jim

Measure 53

I was disturbed to hear this morning information that leads me to think I did not check out the ballot measures carefully enough. As an intelligent conservative, I find it both important and difficult to listen to KBOO and other left-of-center sources regularly, and the comments this morning made it clear that I should invest more energy into that effort.

On the other hand, I was a bit amused (and relieved of my nascent guilt) when I heard you adamantly insist that Measure 53 passed by a 76-24 margin because a day-old paper said so. It is possible that the Oregonian was that far off the mark - if so, I would assume that it was an early edition which showed very preliminary results. I went to three sources this morning of which two gave vote tallies. KATU.com indicates that as of 8am today the vote on 53 was YES 475,838 and NO 473,912 which is a margin of less than 2000 votes out of nearly 1 million. Rounded to the nearest percent, the vote is 50-50. KOIN.com had very similar (probably identical) numbers.

So I figure that if you let your personal opinions cloud such simple and easily ascertained facts, if you are so closed-minded that you will not double-check this when it is disputed, I need not concern myself with your judgment on the more complex issue of Measure 53 itself.

- Gordon

 

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