Womens issues

Stage and Studio on 05/26/09

Program: 
Stage and Studio
Air date: 
Tue, 05/26/2009 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Personal exploration of Mixed Race

Secret Asian Woman is a personal exploration of identity and Mixed Race by Independent Producer Dmae Roberts, who has to make a daily decision to reveal her ethnicity. Through her personal story, Dmae charts four decades of a search by multiracial peoples for a name. The politics of calling out racism has changed through the years as has identification. In this half-hour radio documentary, Dmae talks with other Mixed Race Asian women with identities not easily recognized and addresses with humor the complexities involved in even discussing race.

Old Mole Variety Hour for May 18, 2009

program date: 
Sun, 05/17/2009

First, a big Thanks from the Mole to all of you who contributed to KBOO during the just concluded membership drive.  If you forgot to do it, look for the JOIN NOW link at the top of this page.  KBOO and the Mole need your support.

57:47 minutes (33.07 MB)

Sex, Class and the Internet

Categories:
program date: 
Sun, 05/17/2009

Women's Studies Professor Brooke Campbell talks with the Old Mole's Jan Haaken about recent controversies over erotic services offered on Craig's List. What's the difference between lining up a "date" on Craig's List and arranging a tryst through a "reputable" dating service?

15:47 minutes (9.03 MB)

Intersex: Medicalization of Natural Diversity

program date: 
Mon, 05/18/2009

"Is it a boy or a girl?"

It's the first question asked after the birth of a baby.  But sometimes the answer isn't obvious?  In about one out of every 1,500 births a child is born so noticeably atypical in terms of genitalia that a specialist is called in. Out of every thousand birth one to two children have traditionally been exposed to surgery to "normalize" the appearance of their genitals. Even more people are born with subtler forms of sex anatomy variations some of which won't show up until later in life.
 

56:29 minutes (38.79 MB)

Race and Recession

 

imageThe current recession is not an equal opportunity crisis. People of color are experiencing job loss, foreclosures and lack of healthcare at alarmingly higher rates than white Americans. These disparities are not a coincidence but rather the result of structural barriers that have been taking a toll on people of color long before the subprime meltdown.

Voices from the Edge on 05/21/09

Air date: 
Thu, 05/21/2009 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
Race and Recession: An Interview with Seth Wessler

Thursday May 21: The current recession is not an equal opportunity crisis. People of color are experiencing job loss, foreclosures and lack of healthcare at alarmingly higher rates than white Americans. These disparities are not a coincidence but rather the result of structural barriers that have been taking a toll on people of color long before the subprime meltdown.

Seth Wessler, an analyst with Applied Research Center, believes the same structural causes of racial disparity are also at the root of an economic crisis affecting all Americans. In his recently released Race and Recession: How Inequity Rigged the Economy and How to Change the Rules, Wessler presents the numbers as well as the personal stories that reveal the root causes of racial inequity and proposes the path to an inclusive recovery. This Thursday, Jo Ann and Dave will talk with Wessler about his findings and recommendations.

The conversation doesn't end when the program does. You can join in additional discussion of the week's issue on our blog at kboo.fm/voicesfromtheedge (click on the "blog" tab). You'll find additional information, important links, comments from other listeners and commentary from Jo Ann and Dave. Have a question for our guests, but can't call in during the program? Post your questions on line to become a part of the Voices discussion.

Fixing Sex: On Intersex

Categories:

 Just finished reading Katrina Karkazis Fixing Sex: Intersex, Medical Authority, and Lived Experience, the indepth investigation into how intersex is currently conceived, treated and experienced.  Although I've been somewhat aware of these issues before, some of the material is really mind blowing like 1) how many clictorectomies or clictorous reduction surgeries were/are done in this country, 2) how these surgeries are justified as essential to a child's gender identity despite being purely asethetic and 3) how little surgeons and other clinicians currently treating intersex children are willing to even listen to intersex activists or those who've experienced first hand the long term impact of genital surgery.

Intersex: Medicalization of Sexual Diversity

"Is it a boy or a girl?"

It's the first question asked after the birth of a baby.  But sometimes the answer isn't obvious?  In about one out of every 1,500 births a child is born so noticeably atypical in terms of genitalia that a specialist is called in. Out of every thousand birth one to two children have traditionally been exposed to surgery to "normalize" the appearance of their genitals. Even more people are born with subtler forms of sex anatomy variations some of which won't show up until later in life.
 
Since the 1990s intersex activists have been fighting for an end to unnecessary surgeries, especially those performed at an early age when the person can’t make their own decisions.
 
Tuesday, May 19th from 6 - 7 pm, Gender Blender co-hosts Rebecca Nay and Jacob Anderson-Minshall  talk with three intersex activists about their experiences and what it can teach us all about gender, sex and the medialization of natural diversity.

Gender Blender on 05/19/09

Air date: 
Tue, 05/19/2009 - 6:00pm - 7:00pm
Short Description: 
Intersex activists talk about sex, gender and unneccesary surgery

"Is it a boy or a girl?"

It's the first question asked after the birth of a baby.  But sometimes the answer isn't obvious. In about one out of every 1,500 births a child is born so noticeably atypical in terms of genitalia that a specialist is called in. Out of every thousand birth one to two children have traditionally been exposed to surgery to "normalize" the appearance of their genitals. Even more people are born with subtler forms of sex anatomy variations some of which won't show up until later in life.
 
Since the 1990s intersex activists have been fighting for an end to unnecessary surgeries, especially those performed at an early age when the person can’t make their own decisions.
 
Tuesday, May 19th, Gender Blender host  Jacob Anderson-Minshall  talked with three guests about the intersex experience and what it can teach us about gender, sex and the medialization of natural diversity.

Quiet on the Set!

Take Two: Not Enough Women Calling the Shots

A couple of months ago, I was contacted by Trista with @Large Films, Inc., a commercial production company here in Portland, Oregon. She wanted me to consider interviewing her boss on an upcoming Bread and Roses show, which airs Friday nights at 6pm on KBOO 90.7FM. I couldn't commit right away as I was scheduled to be in Las Vegas to manage a live event for a client; 300 person conference with stage production elements. What's funny though, is when I returned and had a day to run errands, I took a wrong turn and ended up in front of @Large Films' parking lot. I emailed Trista the next day and scheduled an appointment to meet with Juliana Lukasik, owner and executive producer of the company.

Juliana gave me the tour, introduced me to her staff and we proceeded to have a get to know you chat that led to a conversation about the disparity of women in the creative fields; communications and of course the film industry. More specifically, we talked about a paper Juliana wrote on her thoughts coming out of the Boards Summit, "...an annual event for creative agencies, production companies and media to network and learn about the industry from some of the top creative agencies of the world..." Given this paper and her interest in flushing out solutions to increase the number of women calling the shots, we decided to move forward and set a show date in June.

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