Politics

Exonerated: Curtis Edward McCarty and the death penalty

program date: 
Thu, 09/10/2009

Curtis Edward McCarty was convicted and sentenced to death twice for a 1982 murder in Oklahoma City. After repeated court battles and 21 years in prison - 19 on death row - McCarty was exonerated and released following a 2005 appeals court ruling based on new DNA evidence and findings of a "continued pattern of government misconduct." McCarty was the 124th person in the United States to be exonerated and released since 1973 after spending time on death row.

Jo Ann and Dave talk with McCarty about his experience and his struggle to win his freedom.

56:12 minutes (45.03 MB)

Thomas Frank: The Wrecking Crew--How Conservatives Ruined Government, Enriched Themselves, and Beggared the Nation

Categories:
program date: 
Wed, 09/09/2009

 Michelle Schroeder Fletcher interviews Thomas Frank, about The Wrecking Crew: How Conservatives Ruined Government, Enriched Themselves, and Beggared the Nation.

28:51 minutes (19.81 MB)

Guess Who's Coming to Radio??!! playlist for 09/10/2009

Air date: 
09/10/2009

 tonight we honored roy ayers, who was brought to us on this day...  also, we spoke about obama's recent speeches, and about dismantling the cycles of abuse in positive ways...

Kennedy's letter to Obama

Sept. 10,2009

Here's the letter from Ted Kennedy to President Obama, written shortly after the Senator learned his cancer was terminal.

Dear Mr. President,

I wanted to write a few final words to you to express my gratitude for your repeated personal kindnesses to me – and one last time, to salute your leadership in giving our country back its future and its truth.

On a personal level, you and Michelle reached out to Vicki, to our family and me in so many different ways. You helped to make these difficult months a happy time in my life.

You also made it a time of hope for me and for our country.

When I thought of all the years, all the battles, and all the memories of my long public life, I felt confident in these closing days that while I will not be there when it happens, you will be the President who at long last signs into law the health care reform that is the great unfinished business of our society. For me, this cause stretched across decades; it has been disappointed, but never finally defeated. It was the cause of my life. And in the past year, the prospect of victory sustained me-and the work of achieving it summoned my energy and determination.

There will be struggles – there always have been – and they are already underway again. But as we moved forward in these months, I learned that you will not yield to calls to retreat - that you will stay with the cause until it is won. I saw your conviction that the time is now and witnessed your unwavering commitment and understanding that health care is a decisive issue for our future prosperity. But you have also reminded all of us that it concerns more than material things; that what we face is above all a moral issue; that at stake are not just the details of policy, but fundamental principles of social justice and the character of our country.

And so because of your vision and resolve, I came to believe that soon, very soon, affordable health coverage will be available to all, in an America where the state of a family’s health will never again depend on the amount of a family’s wealth. And while I will not see the victory, I was able to look forward and know that we will – yes, we will – fulfill the promise of health care in America as a right and not a privilege.

In closing, let me say again how proud I was to be part of your campaign- and proud as well to play a part in the early months of a new era of high purpose and achievement. I entered public life with a young President who inspired a generation and the world. It gives me great hope that as I leave, another young President inspires another generation and once more on America’s behalf inspires the entire world.

So, I wrote this to thank you one last time as a friend- and to stand with you one last time for change and the America we can become.

At the Denver Convention where you were nominated, I said the dream lives on.

And I finished this letter with unshakable faith that the dream will be fulfilled for this generation, and preserved and enlarged for generations to come.

With deep respect and abiding affection,

[Ted]

Common Sense and Women of Color in Leadership Roles

program date: 
Wed, 09/09/2009

 Common Sense
 Hosted by Kayse Jama and Grassia Melendez.

 Today, Kayse (right) and Grassia (Left) invite four local Women of Color in to discuss what leadership roles Women can play in building Social Justice Movements.  Present in the studio today were:

   Jeri Williams
   Lisa Reed Guarnero
   Dawn Jones
   Lucilene Lira

 

 

56:19 minutes (25.78 MB)

We need a fighter

Sept. 7, 2009

Again, Bill Moyers rides to our rescue.

Let's get on with it, Mr. President. We're up the proverbial creek with spaghetti as our paddle. This health care thing could have been the crossing of the Delaware, the turning point in the next American Revolution — the moment we put the mercenaries to rout, as General Washington did the Hessians at Trenton. We could have stamped our victory "Made in the USA." We could have said to the world, "Look what we did!" And we could have turned to each other and said, "thank you."

As it is, we're about to get health care reform that measures human beings only in corporate terms of a cost-benefit analysis. I mean this is topsy-turvy — we should be treating health as a condition, not a commodity.

Watch the video.

Lots about this on the next show.

-A

Making the case to recall Mayor Sam Adams

program date: 
Thu, 09/03/2009

Volunteers with the campaign to recall Mayor Sam Adams have a little over a month left to collect the 32,183 valid signatures from Portland voters needed to force the Portland mayor to resign or face a special recall election. Campaign organizers have told the press it will be close but support is growing. The campaign - sparked by revelations by Adams that he had lied about his relationship with one of his interns - has brought together strange political bedfellows - from former Adams supporters to extreme conservatives - as well as made Portlanders reflect on how we should judge our elected officials.

Jo Ann and Dave talk with campaign organizer Jasun Wurster about the campaign's chances of success and who has joined the ranks of Portlanders who think the mayor must go. Do you think the mayor's actions warrant his removal? Does focusing on recalling the mayor prevent Portlanders from addressing bigger problems facing our city?

58:38 minutes (46.97 MB)

Center for Intercultural Organizing - on Common Sense

program date: 
Wed, 09/02/2009

 Common Sense
 
Hosted by Kayse Jama and Grassia Melendez

 Join the conversation in a new Talk Radio Show, Common Sense, aimed towards presenting the Immigrant and Refugee Perspective on issues that are under-represented in our Mainstream Media.  Today's guests are Baher Butti and Murad Nuryagdiev from the Center for Intercultural Organizing.  They talk about immigrant and refugee issues in Portland, and how The Center for Intercultural Organizing supports diversification.

 

55:39 minutes (25.48 MB)

Ted Kennedy, Health Care Legislation, and Right WingNuts

program date: 
Tue, 09/01/2009

 Meet the new boss ...
 Hosted by: Abe Proctor and Joe Uris

With Joe still on vacation, Abe looks at the passing of an American icon: Ted Kennedy; and watches our chance for meaningful health care legislation faaaaade away. Plus, more disjointed rage and Aggrieved White Man Syndrome from the wingnut right.

59:22 minutes (27.18 MB)

RIP, Ted K

Categories:

Sept. 1, 2009

Unless you've been living on the moon, you've probably heard by now of the passing of Sen. Ted Kennedy, D-Mass. Given the excoriation regularly -- and usually deservedly -- endured by members of Congress, on this show and elsewhere, it's helpful to pause and remember a legislator who has dedicated his career to advancing the cause of the less fortunate.

The fact that Kennedy was born a patrician doesn't abrogate the work he's done. On the contrary, it throws his career into sharper relief. Despite being born with every possible advantage, he nonetheless had a guiding hand in every significant piece of progressive legislation enacted since he entered the Senate, from civil rights to education to health care, the cornerstone of his career.

Here's Ted, speaking in Alaska on the death of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. It's one of the most cogent articulations I've ever heard of what it means to be a modern progressive.

And here's Ted at the 1980 Democratic convention, after running a quixotic primary challenge -- from the left -- against an incumbent president.

Let us pledge that we will never misuse unemployment, high interest rates, and human misery as false weapons against inflation.

Let us pledge that employment will be the first priority of our economic policy.

Let us pledge that there will be security for all those who are now at work, and let us pledge that there will be jobs for all who are out of work; and we will not compromise on the issues of jobs.

These are not simplistic pledges. Simply put, they are the heart of our tradition, and they have been the soul of our Party across the generations. It is the glory and the greatness of our tradition to speak for those who have no voice, to remember those who are forgotten, to respond to the frustrations and fulfill the aspirations of all Americans seeking a better life in a better land.

We dare not forsake that tradition.

[...]

The commitment I seek is not to outworn views but to old values that will never wear out. Programs may sometimes become obsolete, but the ideal of fairness always endures. Circumstances may change, but the work of compassion must continue. It is surely correct that we cannot solve problems by throwing money at them, but it is also correct that we dare not throw out our national problems onto a scrap heap of inattention and indifference. The poor may be out of political fashion, but they are not without human needs. The middle class may be angry, but they have not lost the dream that all Americans can advance together.

It takes me back to a time when, well, Democrats were Democrats.

And finally, we can't ignore the mythic proportions of Ted and his brothers. They were the American Gracchi.

-A

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