Indigenous issues

Voices from the Edge on 12/10/09

Air date: 
Thu, 12/10/2009 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
What's behind Oregon's domestic violence murder-suicides?

What's behind Oregon's domestic violence murders-suicides?

 

Fourteen Oregonians died last month in five murder-suicides and one attempted murder suicide. Why this sudden outbreak now of men using guns to murder their spouses, ex-spouses and themselves when domestic violence homicides in Oregon have been on the decline? In 1997, 22 domestic violence homicides took place in Multnomah County alone. In recent years, the state average has been eight murder-suicides a year. Is it the economic climate, a lack of social services, or deep-rooted cultural issues?

This week on Voices from the Edge, Jo Ann and Dave talk with Jennifer Warren, LCSW, a counselor with Portland's Men's Resource Center/Women's Counseling Center since 1998. She specializes in domestic violence intervention and recovery, and has worked extensively with men and women arrested for domestic violence. Join us in this discussion about what's behind domestic violence murder-suicides, how the problem is being addressed and what needs to be done to stop the violence.

Ala' Jaradat on the issue of Palestinian political detainees

program date: 
Fri, 11/27/2009

KBOO's Jenka Soderberg speaks with Ala' Jaradat of the Palestinian prisoner support organization Addameer, about the conditions facing Palestinian political detainees - including family visitation, administrative detention, imprisoned children and women, and mothers whose children were born in prison.

58:26 minutes (53.5 MB)

Dhoruba bin Wahad and Naji Mujahid: Denied entry into Palestine

program date: 
Thu, 11/26/2009

5:00 - 6:00 pm Thurs. Nov. 26th

KBOO interviews Dhoruba bin Wahad, who is speaking from a hotel in Jordan after being detained and then denied entry into Palestine by Israeli authorities.  bin Wahad is a former political prisoner in the US who was charged in 1971 with the murder of two police officers, but was vindicated nineteen years later when a judge ruled that the FBI had fabricated evidence in order to frame bin Wahad of a crime he didn't commit.

As an African-American, on his way to a conference on political prisoners convened by the Palestinian Authority in the city of Jericho, bin Wahad feels that he was racially profiled, along with his travelling companion Naji Mujahid - the only two African Americans on a busload of white tourists.

57:57 minutes (53.05 MB)

November 2 Old Mole Variety Hour

program date: 
Mon, 11/02/2009

 

This show, hosted by Clayton Morgareidge, raises questions about the impact of dams on native peoples in Canada; how to get automobiles out of our cities; Kathryn Stockett's novel The Help about black servants in Jackson, Missississippi in the '60s; is  it too late to protect our privacy in a digital world; and Obama's fight with his generals over  Afghanistan.  

57:02 minutes (32.63 MB)

Dams and Native Peoples

program date: 
Mon, 11/02/2009

 Tina Loo studies the impact of  hydropower projects on native people in Canada, and here she talks with the Old Mole's Laurie Mercier about how the techno-perspective of policy makers blinds them to the impacts of their projects on life in the areas where they are  located.    Professor Loo will be appearing next week (Nov. 6-7)  in Vancouver, WA at a major conference about dams -- Reversing the Flow: Big Dams, Power, and People in Global Perspective.

 

14:32 minutes (8.31 MB)

From Terrai to Sellwood: A Story about Radishes

Categories:
program date: 
Wed, 10/14/2009

 Melati Kaye reports on Nepali women refugees who are now gardening in the Portland neighborhood of Sellwood in a once abandoned lot.   The women were given aid  by Mercy Corps'  New American Agriculture Project which assists refugees and immigrants starting small scale farm enterprises in the greater Portland area. The program helps participants to market nutritious food in local outlets through the Pacific Northwest. 

11:08 minutes (7.64 MB)

Filmmaker Tom Chamberlain: "Why Kerala, Grampa"

Categories:
program date: 
Wed, 10/14/2009

 Host Jay Thiemeyer speaks with local progressive filmmaker Tom Chamberlain about his new film "Why Kerala, Grampa", a 90 minute documentary film about activism in one of the most progressive communities on the planet. Chamberlain went to the small Indian state of Kerala, with mini DV cameras to make a film. The KSSP was launching its 18th annual Kala Jatha. The Kala Jatha is street theater, dance, music and poetry intended to engage citizens in the critical issues of the day.

18:02 minutes (12.38 MB)

Common Sense Talk Radio and Movement Building

program date: 
Wed, 10/14/2009

 Common Sense Talk Radio
 Hosted by Kayse Jama and Grassia Melendez
 From the Center for Intercultural Organizing

Today's guest is local activist Lucilene Lira, also from the Center for Intercultural Organizing, and they talk about the problems and experiences immigrants often have when organizing for solidarity and social change. 

 

58:45 minutes (26.9 MB)

Project Censored Benefit for KBOO

KBOO is excited to announce that the editors of Project Censored 2010 will be hosting a benefit for the station. All proceeds except book sales will go to KBOO.

What: An Evening with Project Censored

When: 11/07/2009

Time: 5-7:30PM

Where: First Unitarian Church Main Sanctuary

            1211 SW Main St

             Portland, OR 97205

Donation: $5-15 sliding scale, $10 suggested donataion

Information/Tickets: 503.231.8032 ext 222

 

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