Human rights

Radiozine on 02/13/09

Program: 
Radiozine
Air date: 
Fri, 02/13/2009 - 9:00am - 9:30am

A special program for Black History Month - "Texts of Resistance." How did slaves resist their oppression ? We hear a discussion of three literary works that explore what it means to resist and to survive.

African Film: Alrick Brown on his Documentary, "Death of Two Sons"

Categories:
program: 
Radiozine
program date: 
Mon, 02/09/2009

 Ed Goldberg interviews Alrick Brown, producer of the film "Death of Two Sons," which shows on February 12th as part of the 19th Cascade Festival of African Films.  This documentary examines the death of Amadou Diallo, the 22-year old Guinean immigrant who was senselessly shot to death by 41 bullets fired by New York City policemen, and the death of Jesse Thyne, an American Peace COrps volunteer who lived and worked with Diallo's family in Guinea.

26:55 minutes (12.33 MB)

Old Mole Variety Hour for February 9, 2009

program date: 
Sun, 02/08/2009

Hosted by Bill Resnick, this show features Afrobeat music by Fela Kuti and a conversation about Kuti's life and work.  The show leads off with a critique of the economic stimulus plan: "insufficient, ineffective, ill-conceived" are the words of economist Michael Perlman.  Well-read Red Frann Michel reviews how people of color and immigrants are faring in, and even being blamed for, the economic crisis.  We hear from another economist about urban agriculture in Havana and other Cuban cities.  To hear the whole show, use the arrow above.  To hear individual pieces, and for more information and links, follow the links below.

1.  The understimulating economic stimulus.

51:00 minutes (29.19 MB)

The Music of Fela Kuti

program date: 
Sun, 02/08/2009

The originator of Afrobeat, Fela Kuti was a musician, composer, and human rights activist from Nigeria whose music and political work were highly influential. 

Bill Resnick talks with musicologist Brad Duncan about Fela Kuti's life and music.

6:11 minutes (3.54 MB)

Radiozine on 02/12/09

Program: 
Radiozine
Air date: 
Thu, 02/12/2009 - 9:30am - 10:30am

Madness Radio: Depression And Oppression Alisha Ali

Pilot program

Is depression a result of poverty? How can community development and economic empowerment affect mental health? Psychology professor Alisha Ali discusses the dangers of turning social problems into medical disorders, including bias in diagnosis, limits of "cultural competency" and "anti-stigma" initiatives, and the experiences of immigrant women.

Punk'd?

Hmm. So after a resounding electoral victory, an inauguration the likes of which we've never seen, and an odd new empathic burst of shared purpose, President Obama did what now?

He followed Bush's lead on civil liberties.

 

Obama Administration Maintains Bush Position on 'Extraordinary Rendition' Lawsuit

The Obama Administration today announced that it would keep the same position as the Bush Administration in the lawsuit Mohamed et al v Jeppesen Dataplan, Inc.

A source inside of the Ninth U.S. District Court tells ABC News that a representative of the Justice Department stood up to say that its position hasn't changed, that new administration stands behind arguments that previous administration made, with no ambiguity at all. The DOJ lawyer said the entire subject matter remains a state secret.

It's because of that last item I listed above -- that sense of shared purpose, of belief that all of us are going to get pointed in the right direction -- that this stings so much. "Extraordinary rendition" was one of the most galling of the Bush junta's excesses. Ashcroft, Gonzales & Co. had relied upon "state secrets" privilege to prevent courts from ruling on cases like Mohamed, in which five plaintiffs had been forcibly deported to other countries (we still don't know where) and tortured.

On one of its first chances to turn away from the dark side, the Obama administration has stepped right in the footprints set down by Bush. "State secrets" still prevent the tortured from having their day in court. It's a disgrace.

The only hope I hold out -- and it's a thin one -- is that the situation around rendition is as convoluted as that surrounding the prosecutorial cases for the Guantanamo detainees. Perhaps on this issue, too, the Bushies left such a scorched landscape in their wake that the Obama Justice Dept. is having trouble making head or tail of what went on in the course of "extraordinary rendition." Perhaps they will do the right thing and revisit Mohamed again down the road.

I hope so. I hope Obama is not the Manchurian candidate I feared he might be.

H/T Glenn Greenwald

Strugglebration for Mumia

program: 
Prison Pipeline
program date: 
Sun, 02/08/2009

Friday, Feb. 13, is a very special event! The Portland Friends for the Freedom of MOVE & Mumia Abu-Jamal present: Strugglebration for Mumia Abu-Jamal.
    Portland State University – Smith Memorial Student Union Bldg. (SMU 238)
    6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
    For more information: 503/515-9540


To get us in the mood we heard Mumia speak, a cheer by Jenka, a song by David Strechert and comments by Ruth and Rebecca about the entertainers and speakers who will take part in the night of celebration and struggle.

See you there!
 

27:32 minutes (25.21 MB)

Entrevista con John Gibler, autor de "Mexico Unconquered.Chronicles of Power and Revolt"

Categories:
program: 
Buscando America
program date: 
Thu, 02/05/2009

John Gibler, periodista y activista por los derechos humanos, acaba de publicar  "México no conquistado. Crónicas del Poder y la Revuelta". A través de sus escritos y de sus fotografías John crea un "evocador reportaje sobre los poderes épicos de la violencia y la corrupción en México, y de los desvalidos y rebeldes que arriesgan sus vidas para construir justicia desde la base".

El autor presentó su libro en Portland la noche del 6 de febrero, en Powells City of Books.

19:19 minutes (17.69 MB)

Budget Cuts on Prisoners

program: 
Prison Pipeline
program date: 
Sun, 02/01/2009

Ruth Kovacs was joined by Patty Katz, from Partnerships for Safety and Justice and Tony Perkins, former World Council Chair for Oxford House. They discussed the cuts in Washington State Prison funds for drug and alcohol treatment for prisoners before and after release. Folks are asked to send stories about their addiction to drugs and alcohol and how treatment programs affected their lives. Send the one-page stories to Partnerships for Safety and Justice.

27:09 minutes (24.87 MB)

Breaking Down Poverty's Barriers: An Interview with Dr. Donna Beegle

Poverty is more than a lack of resources. It creates barriers that isolate the poor from the rest of the community and from opportunities to break free from its grip. That isolation also extends to having a voice in research and program development for breakding down poverty's barriers.

Dr. Donna M. Beegle, a national expert on poverty, grew up in a migrant labor family. At 15 she dropped out of school, married, and after ten years of abject poverty became a homeless divorced mother with two children. Through a pilot program that helped her gain self-confidence as well as connections to resources and mentors, she returned to school, eventually achieving a doctorate in educational leadership. For the past 17 years she has conducted research on poverty, authored See Poverty...Be the Difference, and founded the non-profit PovertyBridge to work directly with people impacted by poverty. On March 7, she will be holding an "Opportunity Conference" with 200 Portlanders living in poverty. Her own experience with poverty is part of a PBS documentary, Invisible Nation which will air later this year.

Join Jo Ann and Dave this Thursday as they discuss with Dr. Beegle how to reach across the barriers of poverty to build a more equitable Portland. Can't call in during the program? Send us your questions for Dr. Beegle in advance through the comments section of this blog!

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