Health

Soccer fields vs. social services: The real cost of urban renewal districts.

program date: 
Wed, 03/04/2009

Next week the Portland City Council starts to consider an $85 million proposal by Merritt Paulson to bring major league soccer to Portland. Paulson wants the city to contribute $20-$40 million of urban renewal money - funds intended to combat "urban blight" - to close the deal. The Portland Development Commission's advisory task force has just completed a review that recommends conditional approval. Paulson and his supporters say those dollars will create jobs and enhance the community. Critics not only say that soccer doesn't qualify but that its diverting funds from essential county services.

57:08 minutes (45.77 MB)

Soccer Fields or Social Services? The Real Cost of Urban Renewal Districts.

Next week the Portland City Council consider an $85 million proposal by Merritt Paulson to bring major league soccer to Portland. Paulson wants the city to contribute $20-$40 million of urban renewal money - funds intended to combat "urban blight" - to close the deal. Paulson and his supporters ay sthose dollars will create jobs and enhance the community. Critics not only say that soccer doesn't qualify but that its diverting funds from essential county services.

Voices from the Edge on 03/05/09

Air date: 
Thu, 03/05/2009 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
Soccer Fields or Social Services? The Real Cost of Urban Renewal Districts.

Next week the Portland City Council consider an $85 million proposal by Merritt Paulson to bring major league soccer to Portland. Paulson wants the city to contribute $20-$40 million of urban renewal money - funds intended to combat "urban blight" - to close the deal. Paulson and his supporters ay sthose dollars will create jobs and enhance the community. Critics not only say that soccer doesn't qualify but that its diverting funds from essential county services.

Alternative Radio on 03/04/09

Program: 
Alternative Radio
Air date: 
Wed, 03/04/2009 - 9:00am - 10:00am

Nena Baker - The Body Toxic (lecture)
More than 4 decades ago Rachel Carson, in "Silent Spring," first warned that man-made chemicals were taking a deadly toll on birds and wildlife. Now we are recognizing that chemicals are effecting human
sexual development and reproduction and can cause central nervous system diseases, cancer, and liver disease. Everyone is carrying a dizzying array of chemical contaminants, the by-products of industry
that contribute to a host of health problems in ways just now being understood. These toxic substances, unknown to previous generations, accumulate in our fat, bones, blood, and organs as a consequence of womb-to-tomb exposure. Almost everything we encounter-from soap to soup cans and computers to clothing-contributes to a chemical load unique to each of us. Scientists refer to it as "chemical body burden." Chemical companies would rather consumers never knew about the potential dangers their products pose.

Nena Baker is a former staff writer for "The Arizona Republic," "The Oregonian," and United Press International. Her award-winning investigation of Nike's Indonesian factories led to numerous improvements for workers. She is the author of "The Body Toxic."

If You Love This Planet on 03/02/09

Air date: 
Mon, 03/02/2009 - 10:15am - 11:00am

 

Host Dr. Helen Caldicott interviews Dr. Marcia Angell about drug companies.

What influence do pharmaceutical companies have on medical professionals and the health industry in the US?
This is the topic addressed by author Dr Marcia Angell in her book The Truth About the Drug Companies: How They Deceive Us and What to Do About It, published in 2004 by Random House.

Angell is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Social Medicine at Harvard Medical School. In this important interview with Helen Caldicott she explains how drug companies propagate the myth that they are 'educational institutions', and explores the topics of medical ethics, health policy and the relationship between industry and academic medicine.

Sounds of Awareness on 03/02/09

Program: 
Sounds of Awareness
Air date: 
Mon, 03/02/2009 - 11:30am - 12:00pm

Host Paul Van Dyck speaks with Chris Cooke, a successful Naturopathic Physician who is blind. She  
shares her insights into the healing arts and her success in the use of alternative techniques to better serve her patients. 

Circumcision: Consider the Ramifications!

Categories:
program date: 
Wed, 02/25/2009

caduceus

Host Anna Keith Soderberg discusses the ramifications of circumcision with Marilyn Milos, RN, Executive Director of the National Organization of Circumcision Information Resource Centers (www.nocirc.org) and John V. Geisheker, J.D., LL.M.--Executive Director, General Counsel, Doctors Opposing Circumcision .
 

56:49 minutes (26.01 MB)

Health Equity and the County Budget Crisis

Categories:
program date: 
Wed, 02/25/2009

African Americans in Multnomah County are twice as likely to die from diabetes or stroke than white county residents. Hispanic mothers are two times less likely to have early prenatal care white mothers. Native Americans in the county die from HIV at three times the rate of whites.

Multnomah County, through programs like the Health Equity Intitiative, has made signficant progress in addressing health disparities. But as these figures from the County's March 2008 Report Card on Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities show, much work remains to be done. How will the county do this as it struggles with a deepening budget crisis and the economic meltdown worsens the social and environmental factors that influence health equity in our region?

57:44 minutes (46.25 MB)

Health Disparity and the County Budget Crisis; Also, Testing for Anti-Black Bias

Categories:

African Americans in Multnomah County are twice as likely to die from diabetes or stroke than white county residents. Hispanic mothers are two times less likely to have early prenatal care white mothers. Native Americans in the county die from HIV at three times the rate of whites.

Voices from the Edge on 02/26/09

Air date: 
Thu, 02/26/2009 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
Health Disparity and the County Budget Crisis; Testing for Anti-Black Bias

African Americans in Multnomah County are twice as likely to die from diabetes or stroke than white county residents. Hispanic mothers are two times less likely to have early prenatal care white mothers. Native Americans in the county die from HIV at three times the rate of whites.

Syndicate content

 

Copyright © 2012 KBOO Community Radio | Copyright Policy | Community Guidelines | Website Illustration & Design by: KMF ILLUSTRATION