Environment

Flashpoints

Program: 
Flashpoints
Air date: 
Wed, 12/17/2008 - 11:15am - 12:00pm

Host Dennis Bernstein speaks with journalist Steven Kinzer, who calls the Obama-Gates plan to expand the war in Afghanistan "delusional." Dennis also interviews long-time nuclear critic Karl Grossman about the new nominee to be Energy Secretary. And J.R. has an update on the case of death row inmate Troy Anthony Davis.

Locus Focus

Program: 
Locus Focus
Air date: 
Wed, 12/17/2008 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
A critique of Barack Obama's recently announced environment and energy cabinet nominations; Is Georg

At 8 AM Locus Focus host Barbara Bernstein is joined by writer and activist Harvey Wasserman to critique Barack Obama's recent nominations for cabinet positions related to energy and the environment. At 8:30 Raed Jarrar, Iraq Consultant for the American Friends Service Committee, discusses the fallout from GW Bush's trip to Iraq this past weekend, and how the hurling of a pair of shoes at the president by Iraqi journalist Montather al-Zeidi, is resonating throughout the Arab world.

Radiozine

Program: 
Radiozine
Air date: 
Fri, 12/19/2008 - 9:00am - 10:00am

Host Marianne Barisonek speaks with Rudi H. Nussbaum, of Physicians for Social Responsibility. He recently wrote a paper on childhood cancer clusters around German nuclear reactors. He'll discuss the move to revitalize nuclear power and the possible negative health effects. She also speaks with Tom Carpenter, Executive Director of of the Hanford Challenge. He has investigated and advocated on behalf of numerous whistleblowers and workers at various nuclear sites around the country. He'll talk about Hanford and the Global Nuclear Eneregy Partnership.

 

Art Focus

Program: 
Art Focus
Air date: 
Thu, 12/18/2008 - 10:30am - 11:00am

Eva Lake hosts a tribute to Portland photographer and curator Terry Toedtemeier, who died last week.  Guests include his widow, Prudence Roberts, gallery owner Jane Beebe, and John Laursen, co-author of the book, Wild Beauty, with Toedtemeier. 

Terry Toedtemeier was the Portland Art  Museum’s first curator of photography. He also was co-founder of the Blue Sky Gallery in 1975 and served as its co-director. In 1980 he became Professor of Art and History at the Pacific Northwest College of Art, teaching photography and studio classes.

PDX Electric Vehicle Enthusiasts

Categories:
program: 
Recovery Zone
program date: 
Wed, 11/01/2006

In November 2006, Stephanie Potter visited with the Portland Chapter of the Oregon Electic Vehicle Association,  a non-profit association of electric vehicle enthusiasts who promote electric vehicle education and encourage their safe construction and use.  This show aired during the premiere of Who Killed the Electric Car?

27:54 minutes (19.16 MB)

Columbia Ecovillage: Can Community Trump Hard Times?

Categories:
program: 
Recovery Zone
program date: 
Wed, 12/03/2008

       Can community trump economic hard times?    Founders Joe & Pam Lietch, and Marilee Dea discuss NE Portland's newly forming Columbia Ecovillage.  Community members plan to care for their 3+ acre "food forest," while cultivating supportive relationships with each other, the larger community and the Earth.

27:02 minutes (18.56 MB)

Bridging the Cultural Divide in Oregon's Environmental Movement

Categories:
program date: 
Wed, 12/10/2008

Oregon environmentalists can point to many hard-won victories to preserve ecological diversity. But they've been less successful promoting diversity within their own ranks. The result has been a cultural divide that leaves people of color not just outside the mainstream environmental movment but excluded from having a voice in how we meet the huge environmental challenges that face us. The question is "how do we bridge that divide?" Dave Mazza talks with Marcelo Bonta, founder and executive director of the Center for diversity and the Environment, and Tony DeFalco, Coordinator of the Young Environmental Professionals of Color group. Both men have recently been named fellows of the TogetherGreen Conservation Leadership Program, a new conservation intiative of the National Audubon Society with support from Toyota that funds work on community-focused projects contributing to greater environmental health.

59:39 minutes (47.79 MB)

Mountain Top Removal Coal Mining

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Tue, 12/09/2008

Hosted by Barbara Bernstein with Mine safety & health and environmental expert Jack Spadaro.

The Bush administration continues issuing midnight regulations that will help destroy the earth as we know it. This past week they issued a new rule that loosens restrictions on how mountaintop removal is regulated by reducing the required buffer zones from streams and making it easier for mining companies to dump tailings into rivers and creeks. Mine safety & health and environmental specialist Jack Spadaro will be the guest for this discussion on what is mountaintop removal mining, why it threatens both human and wildlife in the appalachians and what is being done to try to stop it.

48:13 minutes (22.07 MB)

Rain Gardens and Storm Water Management

Categories:
program: 
The Dirtbag
program date: 
Mon, 12/08/2008

 Host Glen Andresen welcomes Candace Stoughton, East Multnomah Soil and Conservation District rain garden specialist,  to discuss the possibility of using edible plants in a rain garden. Candace works on urban conservation issues with a current focus on sustainable stormwater management. She has expertise in low impact development methods that protect streams and rivers from urban stormwater runoff.

 When a landscape is covered in natural vegetation, most rainfall soaks into the ground. As we start adding roofs, driveways, sidewalks, and streets to the landscape, much of the rainfall can’t soak into the ground anymore.  This can create a lot of problems for people and for our streams.

27:13 minutes (24.92 MB)

Oregon Parks

Categories:
program: 
Evening News
program date: 
Sun, 11/30/2008

The U.S. National Park system has a backlog of maintenance and repairs that will cost at least $8 billion, and Oregon’s 10 park units are a part of it. There is a push to get it all done by 2016 for the parks 100-year birthday. The National Parks conservation Association says stepping up the pace could be a way to create jobs and boost local economies.
KBOO's Kendall Archer reports, in collaboration with the Oregon News Service.
 

1:34 minutes (1.43 MB)
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