Special Programming: Public Affairs

Episode Archive

The 17th Homelessness Marathon

Air date: 
Tue, 02/17/2015 - 5:00pm - Wed, 02/18/2015 - 6:00am
Short Description: 
America's only national broadcast focusing on homelessness and poverty
 The 17th Homelessness Marathon
America's only national broadcast focusing on homelessness and poverty will broadcast live from Sarasota, FL, starting at 5p.m., on Tuesday, February 17, 2015 and ending 13  hours later, at 6a.m.on Wednesday, February 18th.

Call in numbers for the broadcast will be-

If you're housed or homeless: 877-NOBODY-8 (877-662-6398)

If you're homeless, formerly homeless, or afraid you're about to be homeless, you can also call: 866-LEFT-OUT (866-533-8688)

DeGentrify Portland

Air date: 
Fri, 02/13/2015 - 7:00pm - 8:00pm
Short Description: 
Fighting Back against the economic and racial forces of displacement
DeGentrify Portland  Project Coordinator Sharita Towne joins KBOO's Mic Crenshaw to talk about the changing face of north Portland, the cost to the community of gentrification, and how people are organizing to resist it.  We'll also hear excerpts from the films produced by the participants in DeGentrify Portland  that address the topic of gentrification and changing neighborhoods in Portland.

Winona LaDuke: Grassroots Strategies for Mitigating Climate Change

Air date: 
Fri, 02/13/2015 - 2:30pm - 4:00pm
Short Description: 
Winona LaDuke on the preservation of tribal lands

Recording of a talk by Winona LaDuke for Portland State of Mind: Campus Sustainability Day at Portland State University. In this keynote address, Winona LaDuke discusses sustainable food growing practices as well as indigenous perspectives and grassroots strategies for mitigating climate change.

Winona LaDuke (Anishinaabe) is an internationally acclaimed author, orator and activist. A graduate of Harvard and Antioch Universities with advanced degrees in rural economic development, LaDuke has devoted her life to protecting the lands and life ways of Native communities. In 1994, Time magazine named her one of America’s fifty most promising leaders under forty years of age, and in 1997 she was named Ms. Magazine Woman of the Year.

Chris Hedges: Days of Destruction, Days of Revolt

Air date: 
Fri, 02/13/2015 - 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Short Description: 
Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Chris Hedges on US imperialism and capitalism
Chris Hedges is a Pulitzer prize-winning journalist, activist, and historian.  He is the best-selling author of a number of books including the 2012 Days of Destruction, Days of Revolt, in collaboration with Joe Sacco.  He has spent nearly two decades as a foreign correspondent, reporting from more than fifty countries, and was in 2002 awarded the Amnesty International Global Award for Human Rights Journalism.  He has been a vocal critic of Israeli foreign policy and recent US wars in the Middle East, and is a supporter of the Occupy Wall Street movement. 

Eric McDavid - victim of FBI entrapment

Air date: 
Fri, 02/13/2015 - 1:00pm - 1:30pm
Short Description: 
Environmental activist who served 9 years in prison for 'thought crime'
KBOO presents an exclusive interview with newly-released 'Green Scare' prisoner Eric McDavid.

After serving 10 years for a wrongful conviction of “conspiracy to damage and destroy property by fire and an explosive”, Eric was set free due to the government’s withholding of key evidence about how he may have been entrapped by an FBI agent.

supporteric.org

KBOO's Artists in Residence present their work

Air date: 
Fri, 02/13/2015 - 11:30am - 1:00pm
Short Description: 
Works produced by artists-in-residence at KBOO
Listen to the pieces produced through KBOO's Artist in Residence program.

The goals of the KBOO Artist Support Program are to support and invest in individuals who are pushing themselves artistically using sound, whose work will impact the cultural landscape of Portland, and to bring those artists into the dynamic KBOO community of local, national, and international artists and activists.


From 11:30 - Noon, we'll hear from Tessie Word, the 2014 KBOO Artist in Residence. She created the sound piece "Convergence"  during her residency.

Edward E. Baptist: Slavery and the Making of American Capitalism

Air date: 
Fri, 02/13/2015 - 10:15am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Edward E. Baptist on his recent book The Half Has Never Been Told
Edward. E. Baptist talks about his 2014 book The Half Has Never Been Told: Slavery and the Making of American Capitalism.  The book elucidates the origins of capitalism in the US and its inextricable links to the exploitation and torture of millions of slaves in the American South.  Forcing readers to come face to face with the violence and abuse at the heart of American power, Baptist offers us a story that confronts head on mainstream narratives of our nation's economic history. 

A forum on police unions and their role in the culture of police violence in the United States

Air date: 
Wed, 02/04/2015 - 6:00pm - 8:00pm
Short Description: 
An in-depth look at the history, role and political influence of police unions
A KBOO Special Forum on Police Unions and their role in perpetuating a culture of police violence. This will be an in-depth look into the history, role and politics of police unions in the light of the post-Ferguson nation-wide uprising against police killings, abuse and impunity.

Michael Slate show

Air date: 
Thu, 01/01/2015 - 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Short Description: 
On Medical Complicity with Torture, and the Danger of Climate Change
Today we present a special program – the Michael Slate show.
We'll hear about Medical Complicity with Torture, and the Danger Facing Humanity and the Planet Due to Climate Change 

Voices of Grief and Struggle:Mothers Come to Washington DC to Demand Police Accountability

Air date: 
Wed, 12/31/2014 - 9:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Mothers of men of color killed by police speak out and demand police accountability

Voices of Grief and Struggle:Mothers Come to Washington DC to Demand Police Accountability

On December 10th WPFW, Pacifica Radio in Washington DC, aired a live broadcast of a 
Congressional briefing featuring the mothers of young men of color who were killed by police. The briefing was co-sponsored by House of Representative members Conyers, Ellison, Johnson, Jackson Lee, and Rangel.

The speakers are 

Audio

Mass Imprisonment is Prison Slavery

program date: 
Tue, 05/13/2014
https://lawandisorder.wordpress.com/
Mass Imprisonment is Prison Slavery
JoNina Abron-Ervin & Lorenzo Ervin
Recorded and produced by Paul Roland, Public Affairs volunteer producer

Summary
More people are incarcerated in U.S. prisons and jails than in any other country in the world. With just five percent of the world’s population, America has twenty-five percent of the world’s prison population. This workshop will examine how the “war” on drugs led to the current mass imprisonment of people of color, who comprise half of the over two million people incarcerated in U.S. prisons and jails; how mass imprisonment has devastated poor and low income communities of color; why mass imprisonment is slavery; and proposals for how to organize people of color to fight to end mass imprisonment.

Contact info:

Memphis Black Autonomy Federation
P.O. Box 16382
Memphis, TN 38186-0382
(901) 674-8430
organize.the.hood@gmail.com

Ida B. Wells Coalition Against Racism and Police Brutality, Kansas City
idabwellsinkc@gmail.com (505) 205-7909

"Prison Imperialism: How the US is Spreading a Repressive Incarceration Model Around the World"

program date: 
Tue, 05/13/2014

Presentation at the Law and Disorder Conference at Portland State University, May 11, 2014 by James Patrick Jordan, Alliance for Global Justice (http://www.afgj.org) (Recorded and produced by Paul Roland)
http://www.lawanddisorder.wordpress.com
Alliance for Global Justice Headquarters

225 E. 26th St., Suite 1
Tucson, AZ 85713
202-540-8336
afgj@afgj.org, james@afgj.org

The US Bureau of Prisons and USAID have been quietly investing in prison construction and helping restructure penal systems in a variety of countries around the world—usually countries with militaries that are heavily subsidized by the US government, that have been directly invaded by the US military, or that are linked to the US through Free Trade Agreements. These countries include Colombia, Pakistan, Iraq, Afghanistan, Honduras, Haiti, the Dominican Republic, Mexico and elsewhere. These efforts are often referred to as the “New Penitentiary Culture”. This “prison imperialism” has its roots in the 2000 accord known as the Program for the Improvement of the Colombian Prison System. Since this accord was implemented, there has been a disproportionately large increase in the general prison population and even more so in the number of political prisoners. Reports of torture in the jails have sky-rocketed. The first Colombian prison constructed with US funding, La Tramacua, is notorious for its bad conditions. In fact, UN, Colombian government agencies and an international NGO have, on three different occasions found fecal contamination of prison food. At La Tramacua, prisoners only have access to fresh water for an average of 10 minutes a day. This workshop will not only shed light on US “prison imperialism”, but will focus as well on the domestic and international struggle against the US model of mass incarceration, neglect and abuse of those we call “Prisoners of Empire.”


  • Length: 62:00 minutes (56.76 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Stereo 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

ALEC Investigative Report: On the influence of ALEC in Oregon

program date: 
Fri, 05/09/2014
During KBOO's all-day special program on KBOO titled Fighting the Neoliberal Agenda on Friday, May 9th, KBOO listeners heard the first report-back from KBOO’s investigative reporting team on the impact of the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) on legislation and legislators in the state of Oregon. Two of these reporters were asked to leave a conference hosted by ALEC at the Kansas City, Missouri Marriott hotel in the first week of May 2014.  The reporters, Mike Klepfer and Yana Maximova, traveled to Kansas City to shadow Oregon legislators with ties to ALEC and to try to identify those business interests that interact with legislators in an effort to update existing lists of businesses affiliated with ALEC.

KBOO recently received a grant from the Fund for Investigative Journalism to do an investigation on ALEC influence in Oregon.

The American Legislative Exchange Council is a tax-exempt, 501(c)3 charitable organization that has existed since the 1960s. In recent years, it has become infamous in its efforts to influence members of state legislatures throughout the country to adopt model legislation ALEC creates through various industry "task forces" that focus on corporate interests. Although the most famous of these, the so called "Stand Your Ground" law, received much attention in the wake of the Trayvon Martin shooting, many others quietly become law. Examples range from legislation that prevents farmers from protesting the nearby plantings of genetically modified seeds to requiring users of solar panels to pay a subsidy to utility companies. Other task forces highlight efforts to, among others, reduce the advocacy of labor, to increase the prevalence of private prisons and to inhibit the ability of states to dictate protocols for identifying railcar contents.

To make a donation to support KBOO and continue this vitally important work,  go to KBOO.FM anytime to pledge your support
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Cascadia Rising: Indigenous Sovereignty and the Rights of Nature Panel

program date: 
Tue, 05/06/2014

Indigenous Sovereignty and the Rights of Nature in Local Governance

a panel featuring Aurolyn Stwyer, Treothe Bullock, Paul Cienfuegos and Lucy Marie

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThis panel seeks to explore the positive and problematic intersections between Indigenous Sovereignty strategies and rights-based organizing in Cascadia, with the purpose of elaborating an appropriate practice of decolonization within a settler colonial context.

As the power of multinational corporations continues to grow and international trade agreements preempt environmental protection laws, can grassroots movements effectively confront the logic and power of colonial law by implementing proactive decolonial assertions of sovereignty from below? Can a bioregional vision be employed to reinterpret the mainstream narrative of the relationship between the State, corporate power, and civil society while dismantling settler colonialism?

Can complementary strategies be developed between these two movements, which both seek to contravene the State-centric sovereignty of “law-from-above” with grassroots assertions of “law-from-below?” What potential risks of re-colonization may exist in Community Rights strategies within a settler colonial context, and how can these risks be recognized, transformed, and deliberately rooted within and through Indigenous vision and struggle?

This dialogue will bring together voices from the Confederated Tribes of Warm Spring, the People’s Water Trust, Friends of Celilo Falls, and Community Rights PDX.
 
BIOS:
Aurolyn Stwyer is a member of the Warm Springs and Wasco tribes. She is a traditional food gatherer for the longhouse. She has an MBA with the University of Minnesota and a master’s degree in human and organizational systems with the Fielding Graduate University, her Ph.D studies has a focus on the Plateau heritage rites of passage ceremonies. Her board memberships include the Museum at Warm Springs, Friends of Celilo, and ONABEN. Aurolyn is the owner of Red Skye Trading Post and Pawn Store at Warm Springs, Oregon.
 
Treothe Bullock is an experienced glaciologist and ecologist who currently works as a science educator, writer and photographer. His blog, Tree Oathe, features writing and photography from a Bioregional Cascadian perspective. He sits on the boards of Friends of Celilo Falls and The Celilo Falls Restoration Fund – working toward restoration of Cascadia’s historic ecological/spiritual/cultural center – Celilo Falls.
 
Paul Cienfuegos is a regional leader in the Community Rights movement, which works to dismantle corporate constitutional so-called “rights” and assert the people’s inherent right to self-government. He has been leading workshops, giving public talks, and organizing local communities since 1995 when he founded Democracy Unlimited in northern California. Since 2011, he has lived in Portland, Oregon, where he co-founded CommunityRightsPDX.org, and is helping to establish the Oregon Community Rights Network which launched in 2013. His talks have been broadcast nationally on ‘Alternative Radio’.
More info can be found at PaulCienfuegos.com
 
Marie is a 4th Generation Portlander. She graduated from the University of Oregon with a degree in Environmental Studies, earned her Permaculture Design Certificate from Three Sisters Permaculture and the Phipps Conservatory in Pittsburgh, PA, She returned to Portland in 2012 to attend the Northwestern School of Law at Lewis and Clark College, where she is now in her last year.
Marie is a co-author of The People’s Water Trust municipal ballot initiative, a first-of-its-kind policy innovation designed to keep our city’s water clean, affordable, accessible, and managed solely in the public’s interest. If enacted (when enacted), the Trust may well become a model of responsible conservation for the entire nation.

 
  • Length: 60:47 minutes (55.64 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Cascadia Rising: Climate Chaos panel

Categories:
program date: 
Wed, 04/30/2014

Climate Chaos and Cascadia: Place-Based Resistance to Global Catastrophe

A Panel featuring Scott Schroder + Friends

clearcutkidsAnthropogenic climate change and the resulting mass extinction, drought, fire, flooding, and skewed weather patterns threaten the Cascadian bioregion, and any of our plans for rehabilitation, restoration, or reinhabitation, more profoundly than any other single industrial act of eco-assualt. Yet because climate change is not an immediately tangible act of destruction restricted to a single place and time, because we can’t see or hear climate change in the same way we can see and hear a dam or clearcut; a visceral sense of the threat of climate change is elusive. This panel breaks from abstract discussion of atmospheric greenhouse gases, and roots the issue in palpable and living things: wolverines, salmon, forests and in rapidly approaching catastrophic effects on the bioregion we call home. We will discuss the effects climate change has already had on the region–increased temperature, rising seas, more precipitation, diminished snowpack–and the landscapes and species that are threatened with extinction or severe alteration by the fossil fuel economy. We will discuss strategies and possibilities for human adaptedness and survival in the face of fundamental ecological changes. We will argue that effective resistance requires reconceiving a nebulous and global catastrophe as an eminent threat to this place and to any living thing who calls Cascadia home.

BIO:Beginning in the late 1990s, Scott Schroder participated in campaigns against industrial logging throughout the western United States with various Earth First! groups, as well as organizing large-scale resistance to clearcutting in the Sierra Nevada with Yuba Nation. Simultaneously, he succeeded in stopping numerous National Forest timber sales with administrative appeals. In 2008, he was a founding member of the Doom School art collective in Portland and later curated music and performances at the Hall of the Woods outside of Olympia, Washington. More recently, he has organized direct action against fossil fuels in California and Oregon and written on the climate policies of both states. He creates a blog and zine, Spring Speaks Truth, and is on probation for blockading tar sands equipment en route through Oregon to Alberta, Canada.

 
  • Length: 70:03 minutes (64.14 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Cascadia Rising: Opening

Categories:
program date: 
Wed, 04/30/2014
Opening of Cascadia Rising: A Bioregional Confluence, with organizers Elona Trogub and Emmalyn Garrett; Alexander Baretich, designer of the Cascadian flag; and Brandon Letsinger of Cascadia Now!
  • Length: 18:38 minutes (17.06 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Cascadia Rising: Biocentric Resistance panel, Part 2

program date: 
Mon, 04/28/2014

Biocentric Resistance as Catalyst for Bioregional Resistance

A workshop led by Karen Coulter

mountainAs the global climate crisis and the spreading radiation from the Fukishima nuclear reactor melt-down demonstrate, the destruction that humans cause to the environment now transcends national boundaries and cannot be repaired with technological solutions or societal value systems that continue to prioritize human desires above ecological limits. For bioregionalism to work in creating a viable future, it is necessary to have a biocentric value system, in which the well-being and flourishing of non-human life has value in itself, independent of the usefulness of the non-human world for human purposes. The richness and diversity of life forms are valuable in themselves.

The philosophy of Deep Ecology posits that humans have no right to reduce the richness and diversity of ecosystems except to satisfy vital human needs. Present human interference with the non-human world is excessive and is rapidly worsening. Policies that need to be changed affect basic economic, technological, and ideological structures. Deep ecologists believe that those who subscribe to these ideas have an obligation to try to implement the necessary changes.

This workshop on Biocentrism and Deep Ecology explains these concepts, explores what changes would need to be made, and examines activist struggles and movements within Cascadia that have pursued these goals.

BIO: Karen Coulter has been part of the Earth First! movement since 1984 and an activist since 1980. She is a naturalist who has spent the last 23 years as co-founder and director of Blue Mountains Biodiversity Project getting to know the forest ecosystems and wildlife of eastern Oregon. She has spent most of every summer in the forests field-surveying thousands of acres of proposed timber sales to protect biodiversity and ecological integrity. She has also been a principal activist with the Program on Corporations, Law, and Democracy; a Board member of the Fund for Wild Nature; and a campaigner for Greenpeace International. She currently volunteers withPortland Rising Tide and works with Blue Mountains Biodiversity Project. She has given workshops on Biocentrism and Deep Ecology at an Earth First! Organizers Conference in Florida and at an Earth First! regional rendezvous in Oregon.

 

Cascadia Rising: Biocentric Resistance panel, Part 1

program date: 
Mon, 04/28/2014
 

Biocentric Resistance as Catalyst for Bioregional Resistance

A workshop led by Karen Coulter

mountainAs the global climate crisis and the spreading radiation from the Fukishima nuclear reactor melt-down demonstrate, the destruction that humans cause to the environment now transcends national boundaries and cannot be repaired with technological solutions or societal value systems that continue to prioritize human desires above ecological limits. For bioregionalism to work in creating a viable future, it is necessary to have a biocentric value system, in which the well-being and flourishing of non-human life has value in itself, independent of the usefulness of the non-human world for human purposes. The richness and diversity of life forms are valuable in themselves.

The philosophy of Deep Ecology posits that humans have no right to reduce the richness and diversity of ecosystems except to satisfy vital human needs. Present human interference with the non-human world is excessive and is rapidly worsening. Policies that need to be changed affect basic economic, technological, and ideological structures. Deep ecologists believe that those who subscribe to these ideas have an obligation to try to implement the necessary changes.

This workshop on Biocentrism and Deep Ecology explains these concepts, explores what changes would need to be made, and examines activist struggles and movements within Cascadia that have pursued these goals.

BIO: Karen Coulter has been part of the Earth First! movement since 1984 and an activist since 1980. She is a naturalist who has spent the last 23 years as co-founder and director of Blue Mountains Biodiversity Project getting to know the forest ecosystems and wildlife of eastern Oregon. She has spent most of every summer in the forests field-surveying thousands of acres of proposed timber sales to protect biodiversity and ecological integrity. She has also been a principal activist with the Program on Corporations, Law, and Democracy; a Board member of the Fund for Wild Nature; and a campaigner for Greenpeace International. She currently volunteers withPortland Rising Tide and works with Blue Mountains Biodiversity Project. She has given workshops on Biocentrism and Deep Ecology at an Earth First! Organizers Conference in Florida and at an Earth First! regional rendezvous in Oregon.

  • Length: 46:00 minutes (42.12 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Cascadia Rising: "Appropriate Appropriation" panel, Part 2

program date: 
Mon, 04/28/2014

Appropriate Appropriation and Ancestral Technology

A Panel with Peter Bauer and Eric Bernardo

glassknapping2-300x200There is growing interest in using ancestral technology as a mechanism for living more sustainably, connecting with ancestral heritage, and providing for yourself with things from nature, or the simple enjoyment of crafting with your hands. While all humans have used various forms of these technologies, there is often friction between Native Americans and non-natives in the United States. This friction stems from the misappropriation of these technologies by non-natives, the privileged position non-native people have of being able to do these things at all (i.e. financial access to schools and gatherings), and a general lack of knowledge of traditional “prehistoric” European traditions among both Native Americans and non-natives. There will never be one right way to practice ancestral technology in a way that appeases everyone’s sensibilities. However, we must spark this discussion on a larger scale to increase the number of people working together and to reach a deeper understanding between different cultures in order to have mutual respect. This panel discussion is a step in that direction.

Questions to be discussed:

  • Where is the line between reclaiming your own ancestral heritage and culturally appropriating from Natives?
  • Is there a way to appropriately appropriate? What technologies have been shared by all human cultures?
  • How does entitlement fit into this discussion?
  • How does privilege fit into this discussion?
  • How do we go about creating alliances and allies between Native Americans and non-natives in using ancestral technologies?

BIOS: Eric Bernardo is a member of the Watlala Band of Chinuk of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde. He received my Masters Degree in Education in 2009 from the University of Oregon and a Bachelors of Arts: History from PSU back in 2008. Go Blazers! He is currently teaching his tribe’s indigenous language at their office in Portland and at a community centre in Eugene.

Peter Bauer (formerly writing under the moniker “Urban Scout”) is a multi-disciplinary artist and environmental educator. During his time as urban scout he received local press in the The Oregonian, Portland Mercury, Willamette Week, national press in ReadyMade Magazine and international press in Positive Living Magazine (UK) and Chain Reaction (AU) for his efforts to create and promote the culture of rewilding. He loves basketry, playing the banjo, and is a fluent speaker of Chinuk Wawa (Chinook Jargon), the Native trade language of the Pacific Northwest. During the summer of 2012 he attended Lynx Vilden’s Stone Age immersion program. Bauer has been an environmental educator for over a decade, working with local organizations like Cascadia Wild, Friends of Tryon Creek, Audubon Society, Portland Waldorf, Shining Star Waldorf, Cleveland High School, and is the executive director at Rewild Portland, a non-profit that he founded. Aside from running Rewild Portland, he currently works at Shining Star Waldorf School in Portland as an instructor for their Nature Immersion Program.



  • Length: 40:04 minutes (36.69 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Cascadia Rising:"Appropriate Appropriation" panel, Part 1

program date: 
Mon, 04/28/2014

Appropriate Appropriation and Ancestral Technology

A Panel with Peter Bauer and Eric Bernardo

glassknapping2-300x200There is growing interest in using ancestral technology as a mechanism for living more sustainably, connecting with ancestral heritage, and providing for yourself with things from nature, or the simple enjoyment of crafting with your hands. While all humans have used various forms of these technologies, there is often friction between Native Americans and non-natives in the United States. This friction stems from the misappropriation of these technologies by non-natives, the privileged position non-native people have of being able to do these things at all (i.e. financial access to schools and gatherings), and a general lack of knowledge of traditional “prehistoric” European traditions among both Native Americans and non-natives. There will never be one right way to practice ancestral technology in a way that appeases everyone’s sensibilities. However, we must spark this discussion on a larger scale to increase the number of people working together and to reach a deeper understanding between different cultures in order to have mutual respect. This panel discussion is a step in that direction.

Questions to be discussed:

  • Where is the line between reclaiming your own ancestral heritage and culturally appropriating from Natives?
  • Is there a way to appropriately appropriate? What technologies have been shared by all human cultures?
  • How does entitlement fit into this discussion?
  • How does privilege fit into this discussion?
  • How do we go about creating alliances and allies between Native Americans and non-natives in using ancestral technologies?

BIOS: Eric Bernardo is a member of the Watlala Band of Chinuk of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde. He received my Masters Degree in Education in 2009 from the University of Oregon and a Bachelors of Arts: History from PSU back in 2008. Go Blazers! He is currently teaching his tribe’s indigenous language at their office in Portland and at a community centre in Eugene.

Peter Bauer (formerly writing under the moniker “Urban Scout”) is a multi-disciplinary artist and environmental educator. During his time as urban scout he received local press in the The Oregonian, Portland Mercury, Willamette Week, national press in ReadyMade Magazine and international press in Positive Living Magazine (UK) and Chain Reaction (AU) for his efforts to create and promote the culture of rewilding. He loves basketry, playing the banjo, and is a fluent speaker of Chinuk Wawa (Chinook Jargon), the Native trade language of the Pacific Northwest. During the summer of 2012 he attended Lynx Vilden’s Stone Age immersion program. Bauer has been an environmental educator for over a decade, working with local organizations like Cascadia Wild, Friends of Tryon Creek, Audubon Society, Portland Waldorf, Shining Star Waldorf, Cleveland High School, and is the executive director at Rewild Portland, a non-profit that he founded. Aside from running Rewild Portland, he currently works at Shining Star Waldorf School in Portland as an instructor for their Nature Immersion Program.



  • Length: 44:49 minutes (41.03 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

 

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