Radiozine

Tune in to KBOO's Morning Radiozine for intriguing Public Affairs programming every Monday through Friday!

 

Coming Soon

Reporter Daniel Forbes on the Toxic Wind Blowing in Portland Neighborhoods
An interview with Erick Lyle by Moe Bowstern
 

Episode Archive

Radiozine on 01/30/12

Program: 
Radiozine
Air date: 
Mon, 01/30/2012 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Dr. Martin Donohoe on public health and social justice, Part 2

Health and Health Care Forum

Host Roberta Hall speaks with Dr. Martin Donohoe of the Portland area who teaches a course in public health concerning social justice and medical care at PSU. This is Part Two of a two-part program.

His forthcoming book is called "Public Health and Social Justice."

His work can be found at www.phsj.org

Radiozine on 01/27/12

Categories:
Program: 
Radiozine
Air date: 
Fri, 01/27/2012 - 11:30am - 12:00pm
Short Description: 
Loss and Grief, the Dougy Center and Grief Watch

Host Kathleen Stephenson speaks with Portland Songwriter and performer Lincoln Crockett and his wife Alicia, and Donna Schuurman, Executive Director of The Dougy Center for Grieving Children & Families.

Radiozine on 01/20/12

Program: 
Radiozine
Air date: 
Fri, 01/20/2012 - 11:00am - 11:40am
Short Description: 
Thomas Frank, author of PITY THE BILLIONAIRE

Host Michelle Schroeder Fletcher welcomes journalist Thomas Frank, author of Pity the Billionaire: The Hard-Times Swindle and the Unlikely Comeback of the Right.

Radiozine on 12/29/11

Program: 
Radiozine
Air date: 
Thu, 12/29/2011 - 11:30am - 12:00pm
Short Description: 
Tony Horwitz, author of "Midnight Rising: John Brown and the Raid that Sparked the Civil War"

Tony Horwitz, author of "Midnight Rising: John Brown and the Raid That Sparked the Civil War," a New York Times Notable Book of 2011, discusses Brown and the raid on Harper's Ferry and what it meant then and means today. Richard Wolinsky of Bookwaves is the host.

Radiozine on 12/23/11

Program: 
Radiozine
Air date: 
Fri, 12/23/2011 - 11:00am - 12:00pm
Short Description: 
Noam Chomsky on “The Causes and Consequences of American Foreign Policy in Israel/Palestine

Renowned linguist, political dissident and scholar-activist Noam Chomsky speaks on “The Causes and Consequences of American Foreign Policy in Israel and Palestine” in a lecture recorded at Barnard College on October 17th.

Radiozine on 12/19/11

Categories:
Program: 
Radiozine
Air date: 
Mon, 12/19/2011 - 11:30am - 12:00pm
Short Description: 
Chiropractor Dr. Vern Saboe on Oregon's Health System Transformation Team

Health and Health Care Forum

Host Robert Hall interviews Vern Saboe, a member of the Oregon's Health System Transformation Team, a group of 45 people from all aspects of health and health care and bi-partisan lawmakers. The group was charged with developing a plan to improve the health delivery system for Oregon Health Plan and Medicaid clients. The plan focuses on coordinated mental, physical, behavioral, and oral health to free up dollars trapped in an inefficient system, increase focus on prevention, and improve care.

Radiozine on 12/19/11

Program: 
Radiozine
Air date: 
Mon, 12/19/2011 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Making an Exit: From the Magnificent to the Macabre - How We Dignify the Dead

Join host and Portland area funeral director Elizabeth Fournier as she talks with Sarah Murray, author of Making an Exit: From the Magnificent to the Macabre---How We Dignify the Dead. Writer and journalist Sarah Murray never gave much thought of what might ultimately happen to her remains, but her curiosity of death disposition choices and why we choose these choices began when her father was facing his end of life. She went on a journey to search out different ways of dealing with grief and how they are expressed.

Radiozine on 12/16/11

Program: 
Radiozine
Air date: 
Fri, 12/16/2011 - 11:00am - 12:00pm
Short Description: 
The Militarization of Indian Country

The Militarization of Indian Country, written by Winona LaDuke & Sean Cruz. They tell the stories of the impact the U.S Military has had on Native Americans' lives and homelands.

Radiozine on 12/15/11

Categories:
Program: 
Radiozine
Air date: 
Thu, 12/15/2011 - 11:30am - 12:00pm
Short Description: 
Calvin Trillin, columnist and essayist, discusses his latest work, "Quite Enough of Calvin Trillin"

From the series Bookwaves Calvin Trillin, columnist and essayist, discusses his latest work, "Quite Enough of Calvin Trillin: Forty Years of Funny Stuff" with host Richard Wolinsky. Recorded in front of an audience in Berkeley on September 19, 2011 as a benefit for KPFA-FM radio.

Radiozine on 12/12/11

Program: 
Radiozine
Air date: 
Mon, 12/12/2011 - 11:30am - 12:00pm
Short Description: 
'A Tribute to Good Health!! ' An interview with nonagenarian David Meade

Health and Health Care Forum

Roberta Hall hosts a conversation with David Meade: 'A Tribute to Good Health!! '   David is 90 years old. They discuss his work with the Chicago Daily News in the 1960s -- that took him to conferences all over the world-- and his growing understanding of US militarism, and his movement toward working toward peace.........   and they talk  about his health --  both spiritual and physical. A VERY UNUSUAL AND INTERESTING PROGRAM, WITH A KBOO LISTENER and member from Philomath, Oregon.........!

Audio

Christopher Ryan, co-author of "Sex at Dawn" talks about Human Sexuality

program: 
Radiozine
program date: 
Mon, 10/31/2011

 Joe Meyer Hosts.

My guest is Christopher Ryan, co author with Cacilda Jetha of Sex at Dawn - the prehistoric origins of modern sexuality. 

The standard narrative of modern human sexuality features a male-dominated ruling class supported by nuclear families each founded on monogamous mating.

Jetha and Ryan show that the monogamy model is very different from how humans lived before agriculture and from our genetic - preconscious expectations.

This conflict between how we evolved to behave and what society has come to expect of us, argue the  man and woman co-authors, is destructive to individuals, families, society as a whole and even the robustness of our offspring.
  
Dr Ryan discusses the evidence against the standard narrative of human sexuality and the evidence for a  more humane myth of what we have evolved to be.

Our discussion is disorganized into three sections.
observation of humans in our time - both domesticated and un
comparison of humans with other apes and anatomical evidence all pointing towards a more promiscuous and egalitarian past.

While some parts may be embarrassing, an objective understanding of our evolved sexuality can only help bring peace among the humans..

 
 
 

 

Interview with "Sex and Dawn" Author Christopher Ryan

program: 
Radiozine
program date: 
Mon, 10/31/2011

 

 
The standard narrative of modern human sexuality features a male-dominated ruling class supported by nuclear families each founded on monogamous mating.
 
Jetha and Ryan show that the monogamy model is very different from how humans lived before agriculture and from our genetic - preconscious expectations.
 
This conflict between how we evolved to behave and what society has come to expect of us, argue the  man and woman co-authors, is destructive to individuals, families, society as a whole and even the robustness of our offspring.
  
Dr Ryan discusses the evidence against the standard narrative of human sexuality and the evidence for a  more humane myth of what we have evolved to be.
 
Our discussion is disorganized into three sections.
observation of humans in our time - both domesticated and un
comparison of humans with other apes and anatomical evidence all pointing towards a more promiscuous and egalitarian past.
 
While some parts may be embarrassing, an objective understanding of our evolved sexuality can only help bring peace among the humans..

Chiapas Photography Project is hosting 2 Mayan women photographers and Project Director

program: 
Radiozine
program date: 
Mon, 10/24/2011

 The guests are members of the Chiapas Photography Project (CPP) which currently hosts 2 Maya women photographers and the director of the project in the Portland area for lectures and workshops.  Their photos offer a privileged look at family, home and village life today. Their lectures and workshops build cross cultural understanding while encouraging pride in ethnic identity.

The Chiapas Photography Project  provides indigenous Maya people in Chiapas, Mexico with opportunities for cultural and artistic self-expression through photography. Since 1992, over 300 indigenous men and women from different ethnic groups and religious backgrounds have learned how to use photography as a mode of personal artistic expression, and many have undertaken projects that celebrate and engage members of their communities.

CPP is based in San Cristóbal de Las Casas, the commercial and cultural center of the Chiapas Highlands. The Project’s activities are both local and global in scope. CPP photographers have exhibited their work in their own towns, as well as in museums, galleries, and alternative spaces throughout the world. CPP also provides educational workshops and presentations, which educate diverse audiences about how the Project uses photography as a means to share and celebrate indigenous cultures.

The Chiapas Photography Project has gained recognition from the Mexican, American, and international press, the academic community, and the art world. As CPP has gained a global presence, it has provided opportunities for volunteers and professional photographers from around the world to work with indigenous photographers.

CPP adapts to the always-evolving photography environment, incorporating new technology, while respecting the varied conditions and preferences of those who participate in activities.

 

"The Economics of Happiness," an interview with Helena Norberg Hodge

program: 
Radiozine
program date: 
Tue, 10/11/2011

Host Kathleen Stephenson interviews Helena Norberg-Hodge, the internationally renowned environmentalist and leading critic of conventional notions of growth and development. She is the recipient of the Right Livelihood Award, also known as the alternative Nobel Prize. She is founder and director of the International Society for Ecology and Culture and author of "Ancient Futures: Learning from Ladakh.

Helena Norberg Hodge talks about the upcoming Portland screening of her documentary film "The Economics of Happiness" on October 14th. The screening is a fundraiser for the Earth and Spirit Council. The "Economics of Happiness" depicts a world that, on the one hand, continues to promote globalization and the consolidation of corporate power. But at the same time it shows the movements of people around the world who are resisting those policies, demanding a re-regulation of trade and finance—and, far from the old institutions of power, they’re starting to forge a very different future.

Also part of the interview is Linda Rudnick, a board member of the Earth and Spirit Council.

Join the Earth and Spirit Council for a special fundraising screening of The Economics of Happiness, a documentary about the worldwide movement for localization by Helena Norberg-Hodge, Steven Gorelick & John Page, held at The Hollywood Theatre at 7 pm on Friday, October 14, 2011.

http://earthandspirit.org/Economic-of-Happiness.htm

  • Length: 30:15 minutes (27.69 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Sandra Steingraber talks about hydro-fracking and how it threatens our air, water and food.

program: 
Radiozine
program date: 
Mon, 10/10/2011

 The guest is writer and ecologist Sandra Steingraber, author of the groundbreaking book "Living Downstream: An Ecologist's Personal Investigation of Cancer and the Environment." Her latest book is "Raising Elijah: Protecting Children in an Age of Environmental Crisis." She talks about hydro-fracking and how it threatens our air, water and food. Steingraber is a powerful voice against fracking in her home in New York state.

Sandra Steingraber is speaking in Portland on Thursday October 20, 2011 from 7-9PM at the Old Church at 1422 SW 11th Ave. The event is is hosted by the Northwest Center for Alternatives to Pesticides (NCAP).

 

True Wealth: How & Why Millions of Americans Are Creating a Time-Rich, Ecologically Light, Small-Scale, Hi-Satisfaction Economy

program: 
Radiozine
program date: 
Fri, 10/07/2011
Host Michelle Schroeder Fletcher interviews Juliet Schor about her recent book: True Wealth: How and Why Millions of Americans Are Creating a Time-Rich, Ecologically Light, Small-Scale, High-Satisfaction Economy 
 
Publisher Comments:
A groundbreaking statement about ecological decline, suggesting a radical change in how we think about consumer goods, value, and ways to live.   In True Wealth, economist Juliet B. Schor rejects the sacrifice message, with the insight that social innovations and new technology can simultaneously enhance our lives and protect the planet. Schor shares examples of urban farmers, DIY renovators, and others working outside the conventional market to illuminate the path away from the work-and-spend cycle and toward a new world rich in time, creativity, information, and community.
 
Juliet B. Schor is a bestselling author, professor of sociology at Boston College, and cofounder of A New American Dream, an organization devoted to transforming North American lifestyles to make them more ecologically and socially sustainable. She lives in Newton, Massachusetts.

CAIR: Where do the Feds Get These People? Anti-Muslim 'Trainers' unleashed on the Rookies

program: 
Radiozine
program date: 
Wed, 10/05/2011

A Washington state Muslim group has asked the U.S. Department of Justice to investigate alleged anti-Islam bias in FBI trainings of law enforcement officers and regular citizens.

In a letter mailed Monday to the department's civil rights division, the Washington Council on American-Islam Relations accused the FBI of trainings that including "false, misleading and fear-producing information."

The letter lists a number of complaints about FBI trainings, including one in Seattle last spring, where participants at a "citizens' academy" at the FBI office said they were given a handout comparing Arab/Islamic propaganda with Nazi propaganda.

The complaint also mentioned an FBI training lecture in Washington, D.C., also last spring that was critical of Islam. The bureau employee who gave the lecture contended, among other things, that the more devout a Muslim is, the more likely he is to be violent. The lecture came to light last month, at which time the FBI said it has begun a review of its training to make sure it is consistent with FBI standards.

A Muslim-American woman who participated in the Seattle training said she was surprised by the handout because everything else about the eight-session "citizens' academy" had been respectful.

The FBI in Seattle has issued a statement saying the agency is currently conducting a comprehensive review of all training and reference materials that relate to religion or culture.
  • Length: 5:16 minutes (4.82 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Northwest Permaculture Convergence: Finding Common Cause

program: 
Radiozine
program date: 
Wed, 09/28/2011

 Host Sue Supriano speaks with Jan Spencer, organizer of the Northwest Permaculture Convergence, which will be held October 13 - 16 in Portland and the Columbia County Fairgrounds [St. Helens]. The theme is "Finding Common Cause."

Jan Spencer has lived in New York, Texas, Arkansas and Oregon. He has travelled out of a back pack to over 35 countries over 5 years on four continents. Highlights of his life include living two years in a rural commune in the Arkansas Ozarks, backpacking in the Ruwenzori Mountains of western Uganda, surfing at Raglan, New Zealand, painting adventures by bike in Italy and his current suburban permaculture project in Eugene. Jan's interests include geography, global affairs and art. He is a self described weather and climate enthusiast.

Urban land use, economics, permaculture, human potential, spirituality, global relations and the environment combine for a unique fusion of Jan's interest. His presentations are upbeat, positive and entertaining including elements of scholar, social critic and stand up comedian.

Jan has made presentations in numerous towns in Oregon, Washington State, the Bay Area, Austin, Texas and Eugene. Venues and hosts have included neighborhood meetings, civic organizations, churches, Grange Halls and conferences such as the Eco City World Summit, Bioneers, Environmental Law Conference and National Co Housing Conference in Seattle.

Articles Jan has written have been featured in The Permaculture Activist, Talking Leaves, Architecture Week, Sentient Times and numerous guest opinions in the Eugene Register Guard. He has made radio interviews in Oregon, Washington State and Florida. He self published “Global Trends – Local Choices” and is working on a fiction novel Eugene – 2035.

Finally, Jan has become a pioneer and advocate for suburban property conversion. His ¼ acre site in Eugene, after ten years, convincingly shows what a suburban property can become. It features grass to garden, rain water catchment, reclaiming automobile space, passive solar re design, edible landscaping and much more. The implications of suburban property conversion are immense touching on economics, human potential, the environment and eco culture change.

 
 
 

 

Emma Marris on her book "Rambunctious Garden: Saving Nature in a Post-Wild World."

Categories:
program: 
Radiozine
program date: 
Mon, 09/26/2011

Host Gene Bradley speaks with Emma Marris, author of "Rambunctious Garden: Saving Nature in a Post-Wild World."  In her book Marris interviews leading scientists and environmentalists and visits imaginary Edens, designer ecosystems, and Pleistocene parks. She contends that we must replace our desire for an unattainable Eden with a more practical dream: a global, half-wild, "rambunctious garden" planet, tended by us.

 
 
 

 

Ben Ross, co-author of THE POLLUTERS, on the chemical industry's impacts on health and environment

program: 
Radiozine
program date: 
Mon, 09/19/2011

Roberta Hall of Health and Health Care Forum hosts a conversation with Ben Ross, co-author of "The Polluters: The Making of Our Chemically Altered Environment", which examines the history of the chemical industry's impacts on health and the environment.

Benjamin Ross and Steven Amter tell the story of how the chemical industry, abetted by a compliant government, set loose a plague of pollution that began in the years before and directly following World War II, a plague that still lingers today. The advent of new synthetic chemical products such as Nylon and DDT created new hazards just as the expansion and mechanization of industry exacerbated old ones. Environmental dangers well known today — smog, pesticides, lead, chlorinated solvents, asbestos, and even global warming — were already recognized in that era by chemists, engineers, doctors, and business managers. A few of them spoke out about these dangers, others overlooked scientific truth in pursuit of wealth and prestige, and many struggled to find a balance between the interests of industry and the needs of the wider world.

 
 
 

 

Comments

Correction

 A typo occured with one of our guests, Todd Dalotto on Radiozine this past Friday. Our apologies for the oversight.

 

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