Radiozine

Tune in to KBOO's Morning Radiozine for intriguing Public Affairs programming every Monday through Friday!

 

Coming Soon

Founder Hank Patton & students discuss stewardship learning at World Steward in the Columbia Gorge
Moms Demand Action and Promoting Health and Safety and Measures to Keep Children Safe from Violence
 

Episode Archive

Dreamland Art Collective

Program: 
Radiozine
Air date: 
Fri, 07/25/2014 - 11:40am - 12:00pm
Short Description: 
Dreamland Art Collective
Host Daniel Flessas speaks with Amy Conway and Erica Thomas of Dreamland Art Collective about a series of events they are curating from July 27th through August 1st at the Weird Shift Storefront, an art space located at 201 N. Alberta St. This series of relational performances, which will include text message plays, getting into bed with strangers, dance and music collaborations, and more, will act as micro-examinations into how culture and technology are shifting the structure of relationships.

Saving White Oak Savanna in West Linn

Program: 
Radiozine
Air date: 
Fri, 07/25/2014 - 11:20am - 11:40am
Short Description: 
Saving White Oak Savanna in West Linn
Host Kathleen Stephenson speaks with Roberta Schwarz about saving the White Oak Savanna of the Willamette Valley and a Summer Concert for the White Oak Savanna on Saturday July 26th from 3:30 to 5:30 at the Adult Community Center.

Update on Gaza

Program: 
Radiozine
Air date: 
Fri, 07/25/2014 - 11:00am - 11:20am
Short Description: 
Update on Gaza
Host Jenka Soderberg speaks with Mohammad Nabil, a Palestinian from Gaza who has been living in Portland for the past two years while he pursued a Master’s degree from the Pacific NW College of Art. He talks about the most recent deaths from Israeli bombings in his homeland.

New Devices to Monitor Air Pollution

Program: 
Radiozine
Air date: 
Mon, 07/21/2014 - 11:30am - 12:00pm
Short Description: 
New Devices to Monitor Air Pollution
Health and Health Care Forum with host Roberta Hall

Honduras

Program: 
Radiozine
Air date: 
Fri, 07/18/2014 - 11:00am - 12:00pm
Short Description: 
Honduras

Host Kathleen Stephenson speaks with local activists Raechel Townsend and her husband Dany Cavedo, who is from Honduras, about the situation in Honduras and how it related to the children coming to the U.S. fleeing violence in their home countries. They'll also talk about helping a community in Honduras build a community radio station.

A Navajo Elder Remembered

Program: 
Radiozine
Air date: 
Tue, 07/15/2014 - 11:30am - 12:00pm
Short Description: 
A Navajo Elder Remembered

Art Focus is off today. Instead we'll hear a program from the series "Sprouts called A Navajo Elder Remembered." 

David Cay Johnston on Health Care Inequality

Program: 
Radiozine
Air date: 
Mon, 06/30/2014 - 11:00am - 12:00pm
Short Description: 
David Cay Johnston on Health Care Inequality

Health and Health Care Forum

Writer Jean Kwok on her latest work

Program: 
Radiozine
Air date: 
Mon, 06/23/2014 - 11:30am - 12:00pm
Short Description: 
Writer Jean Kwok on her latest work

Host Sarika Mehta interviews writer Jean Kwok about her latest work "Mambo in Chinatown".
 
Jean Kwok immigrated from Hong Kong to Brooklyn when she was five and worked in a Chinatown clothing factory for much of her childhood. She won early admission to Harvard, where she worked as many as four jobs at a time, and graduated with honors in English and American literature, before going on to earn an MFA in fiction at Columbia. In between her degrees, she worked for three years as a professional ballroom dancer for Fred Astaire Studios in New York City. 

2nd Annual Resistance Ecology Conference, June 27 to 29: "Moving Theory to Action"

Program: 
Radiozine
Air date: 
Mon, 06/23/2014 - 10:15am - 11:00am
Short Description: 
Discussion with organizers of 2014 Resistance Ecology Conference, at Portland State University

Host Stephanie Potter speaks with Justin Kay and Tim Hitchins, organizers of the 2nd Annual Resistance Ecology Conference (2014)

The Beehive Design Collective on part three of their trilogy about globalization in the Americas

Program: 
Radiozine
Air date: 
Fri, 06/20/2014 - 11:30am - 12:00pm
Short Description: 
The Beehive Design Collective on part three of their trilogy about globalization in the Americas

From the series Sprouts an interview with the Beehive Design Collective about their third and final image in the Beehive's trilogy about globalization in the Americas, focusing on resistance to mega-infrastructure projects that are literally paving the way for free trade agreements that devastate local economies and communities. Audio of the interview is used to "see" the story of the MezoAmerica Resite
traveling art exhibit detailing the struggle for environmental justice in Central and South America. 

Audio

Lindauer Knocks It Out of The Park - Axgain

program: 
Radiozine
program date: 
Mon, 03/21/2011

Susan Lindauer: Lockerbie Diary-Gadhaffi, Fall Guy for CIA Drug Running.  Lindauer is a Former U.S. Asset covering Iraq and Libya

 For years I was told the terrorist who placed the bomb on board Pan Am 103, known as the Lockerbie bombing, lives about 8 miles from my house, in Fairfax County, Virginia.   His life-time of privilege and protection, gratis of high flyers in U.S. Intelligence, has been a reward for silence on the CIA’s involvement in drug trafficking in Lebanon during the 1980s.   As sources go, I was more than a casual observer. From May 1995 until March 2003, I performed as a back channel to Tripoli and Baghdad, supervised by my CIA handler, Dr. Richard Fuisz, who claimed from day one to know the origins of the Lockerbie conspiracy and the identity of the terrorists. http://issuepedia.org/1998-12-04_Susan_Lindauer_Deposition He swore that no Libyan participated in the attack.    Armed with that assurance, our team started talks with Libya’s diplomats for the Lockerbie Trial, and I attended over 150 meetings at the Libyan Embassy in New York. After the hand over of Libya’s two accused men, our team engaged in a concerted fight to gain permission for Dr. Fuisz to give a deposition about his primary knowledge of the conspiracy, during the Lockerbie Trial. In a surprise twist, the U.S. Federal Judge in Alexandria, Virginia imposed a double seal on a crucial portion of Dr. Fuisz’s deposition. The double seal can only be opened by a Scottish Judge. In my opinion, that should be a priority, as testimony hidden by the double seal maps out the whole Lockerbie conspiracy. Most significantly, it identifies 11 terrorists involved in the attack. Dr. Fuisz’s testimony could put the whole matter to rest forever.

 

There’s good reason for my confidence. Much to my surprise, during the Lockerbie talks, Dr. Fuisz’s allegations of CIA opium running in Lebanon received unusual corroboration. One day, as I left the office of Senator Carol Moseley-Braun on my lunch break, an older spook caught up with me in front of the U.S. Supreme Court. From out of nowhere, he stepped in my path and invited me to lunch. With extraordinary candor, he debriefed me as to what motivated the CIA’s actions. I remember it as one battle-hardened old spook sharing the perils of fieldwork with a gung ho young Asset, anxious to get started on great adventures.

 

It was a morality tale for sure. According to him, the CIA infiltrated opium and heroin trafficking in Lebanon as part of a crisis operation to rescue AP reporter Terry Anderson and 11 other American and British hostages in Beirut, including CNN bureau chief Jeremy Levin and Anglican envoy Terry Waite. The hostage crisis was a legitimate CIA concern. The CIA Station Chief of Beirut, William Buckley, was also kidnapped by Islamic Jihad and brutally tortured to death, his body dumped in the street in front of CIA headquarters. The rescue was protracted and complicated by Lebanon’s Civil War—ultimately, Terry Anderson’s captivity lasted seven years. Many of the hostages suffered beatings, solitary confinement chained to the floor, and mock executions.     The older spook who refused to identify himself swore that the CIA considered it urgently necessary to try every possibility for recovering the hostages. The concept of infiltration into criminal networks cuts to the murky nature of intelligence itself. Drug enforcement frequently rely on the same strategies. Where the CIA went far wrong was in pocketing some of those heroin profits for itself along the way. The dirty little secret is that the CIA continued to take a percentage cut of opium and heroin production out of Lebanon well into the 1990s.

As for the hostage rescue itself, considering the operation took years to accomplish, it’s always been whispered that a corrupted CIA officer enjoying those opium profits might have swallowed reports on the hostages’ locations, or otherwise diverted his team in order to protect his narcotics income.   That appears to have become a serious fear at the time, among other U.S. officers jointly involved in the rescue.    In December 1988, infuriated Defense Intelligence agents issued a formal protest, exposing CIA complicity in Middle East heroin trafficking. When teams from both agencies got summoned back to Washington to attend an internal hearing, they boarded Pan Am 103. A wing of militant Hezbollah led by Ahmed Jibril, his nephew Abu Elias, Abu Talb and Abu Nidal took out both teams in order to protect their lucrative cartel.    Classified Defense Intelligence records show that Jibril and Talb had been toying with a conspiracy to bomb a U.S. airplane during the 1988 Christmas holidays anyway. They planned to bomb a U.S. airliner in revenge for the U.S.S. Vincennes, which shot down an Iranian commercial airliner loaded with Hajiis returning from Mecca in July, 1988. However the Defense Intelligence threat to expose their heroin network put the bombing plan into action. Islamic Jihad’s ability to discover actionable intelligence on the flight schedules would definitely confirm that somebody at CIA was operating as a double agent, keeping Islamic Jihad a step ahead of the rescue efforts.

That’s the dirty truth about Lockerbie. It ain’t nothing like you’ve been told.

 Wait a darn moment—I anticipate your confusion. Libya got blamed for the Lockerbie attack. Daddy George Bush told us so! The United Nations imposed sanctions on Libya, demanding that Colonel Moammar Gadhaffi hand over two Libyans for trial. One of the two, Lameen Fhima got acquitted immediately. The other Abdelbasset Megrahi got convicted (on the most flimsy circumstantial evidence that overlooked endless contradictions). Libya paid $2.7 billion in damages—amounting to $10 million per family death— to make the U.N. sanctions go away, and expressed a sort of non-apology for the deaths—while never acknowledging its involvement in the conspiracy.     So Libya was innocent the whole time? In a word, yes.

 Don’t get me wrong: I have no soft spot for Libya. As an Asset, I saw that no matter the flowing promises of friendship, at heart Libyans hearken to their glory days as Bedouin raiders. It’s pathological, not personal. They are deeply tribal and Islamic, which often makes them paranoid and suspicious of outsiders. They have an ancient history of raiding each other’s camps, back and forth, stealing livestock, women and children. One of my best diplomatic sources had a tattoo on his wrist, because his grandmother feared he would be kidnapped as a small child (in the 1950s). Libya simply does not have a history of believing that it needs to keep promises to individuals outside their clans. That’s not part of their heritage.   That vendetta culture bodes dangerously for the current rebellion. Even after Gadhaffi’s gone, in all likelihood these tribal families will continue to exact vengeance on one another. It remains to be seen whether the new government will hide those clashes to protect its image of cohesion and legitimacy to the outside world. In truth, Libyan culture poses a threat to itself most of all.

 

I don’t say that about just any Arab country. I enjoy Arab culture very much. I just know better than to do favors for Gadhaffi. His actions often mask some other agenda.   But the bottom line is that Libya had nothing to do with the bombing of Pan Am 103, which exploded over the town of Lockerbie, Scotland.   We should care about Lockerbie because of the serious problem that it exposed. Opium trafficking out of the Bekaa Valley provides a major source for global heroin production. In turn, the global pipeline of narco-dollars keep militant operations alive world-wide from the Middle East to Indonesia, Colombia, Burma and the Far East.    That’s something to fear. We don’t have to deploy soldiers to shut it down. With a little creativity, we could attack the bank accounts of these global heroin traffickers and cut off funds for the violence without damaging the local society through warfare. We could strike down two scourges—heroin and terrorism. And the U.S. would not require military action all over the planet to accomplish its goals. Thankfully, there are other ways.

 The first step is recognition.

  • Length: 33:54 minutes (31.03 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Scott Simon and his book, "Baby, We Were Meant For Each Other"

Categories:
program: 
Radiozine
program date: 
Mon, 03/14/2011

Host Ed Goldberg interviews NPR host Scott Simon about his book "Baby We Were Meant for Each Other," a memoir about Simon's a adoption of two girls from China.

'Extreme Prejudice': In the Belly of The Bush, with author Susan Lindauer

program: 
Radiozine
program date: 
Mon, 02/28/2011

extremeprejudiceusa.wordpress.com/2010/10/10/extreme-prejudice-by-susan-lindauer/

Susan Lindauer worked for years through back channel resources around the world as a CIA asset specializing in counter-terrorism, set up the diplomatic architecture that - had it been adopted - would have avoided the Iraq War.  For her extraordinary dedication and commitment to American security, Lindauer was arrested, incarcerated at Carswel, Texas's Communication Management Unit where they attempted to drug her and prevent her from standing trial.  Authorities at Carswell figured it would take a little longer than it usually did to "break" her because...Well...(and this is a little embarrassing for our beloved government)...because as a CIA asset she was CIA-trained.  Susan Lindauer has it all documented, again thanks to our own Patriot-acting agents who thoughtfully taped every conversation: Your tax dollars at work!  Read the book;  It's a King Hell nightmare on wheels.  No one could make this shit up.

  • Length: 26:14 minutes (24.02 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Susan Lindauer, Whistleblower, CIA Asset, Peace Negotiator, Writer...& Survivor of Carswell CMU

program: 
Radiozine
program date: 
Mon, 02/28/2011

 Host Chris Andreae speaks with Susan Lindauer, Whistleblower, CIA Asset, Peace Negotiator, Writer...& Survivor of Carswell CMU about "Extreme Prejudice: The Terrifying Story of the Patriot Act and the Cover Ups of 9/11 and Iraq."

EXTREME PREJUDICE is an expose of the real facts surrounding the CIA's advance warning of 9/11 and an insider's look at Iraqi Pre-War Intelligence, told by one of the very few U.S. Assets covering Iraq before the War.

Dr. Joan Gross on Food, Hunger, and Food Culture in the Willamette Valley

Categories:
program: 
Radiozine
program date: 
Mon, 02/21/2011

 Host Roberta Hall interviews Dr. Joan Gross, Professor of Anthropology at Oregon State University. She studied linguistic and cultural anthropology. She now works in the area of food, hunger and food culture in the Willamette Valley.

The Far From Hollywood Film Awards for 2011

Categories:
program: 
Radiozine
program date: 
Mon, 01/24/2011

 Host Ed Goldberg speaks with DK Holm and Marc Mohan about Far From Hollywood, an association of film critics, and the 2011 awards to be announced at the Hollywood Theater on Friday January 28th.

Max Rameau and Take Back the Land

program: 
Radiozine
program date: 
Mon, 12/27/2010

Host Sue Supriano interviews Max Rameau about Take Back the Land, which he founded in 2006. The group initiated a bold campaign that sparked a national movement: they began taking over foreclosed and government-owned homes, and moving homeless families into them. They have successfully moved in over 20 families to date, and many have used the opportunity to save up money and get back on their feet.

Max is a Haitian-born Pan-African theorist and organizer. He moved to Miami, Florida in 1991 and began organizing around immigrant rights, especially for Haitian immigrants, criminal justice issues and police brutality.

In 2008, Max authored the book Take Back the Land, recounting the experiences and political theory behind the Umoja Village.

 

 

Thomas Frank (Harper's) and Bright Frenetic Mills - Media Content Generation Mills

Categories:
program: 
Radiozine
program date: 
Mon, 12/13/2010

 Host Michelle Schroeder Fletcher speaks with journalist and author Thomas Frank, who recently joined Harper's Magazine as a monthly columnist. His first column for Harper's is in the December 2010 issue. It's called  "Bright Frenetic Mills." Frank writes about how media has become one big content generation mill.  In the new January issue, (pictured at left), Frank's column is called "The Fatal Center." He asks whether the U.S. political spectrum has a center or whether it is completely polarized.

Frank is the founder and editor of The Baffler and the author of several books. Other writings include essays for Harper's MagazineLe Monde diplomatiqueBookforum, and the Financial Times. His book What's the Matter with Kansas?, published in 2004, earned him nationwide and international recognition.

 

Fen Montaigne, author of "Fraser's Penguins: A Journey to the Future in Antarctica."

program: 
Radiozine
program date: 
Mon, 12/13/2010

 Host Kathleen Stephenson interviews Fen Montaigne, author of "Fraser's Penguins: A Journey to the Future in Antarctica." Journalist and author Fen Montaigne discusses the beauty of Antarctica, the lives of the Adelie penguins and the details of the work of scientist Bill Fraser. Fraser has worked in Antarctica since 1975. He has documented how the part of Antarctica that is home to Adelie penguins and other wildlife has warmed faster than almost any place on earth. No creature has been more profoundly affected by the changes than the Adelie, who depends on sea ice to survive.

Radiozine on 11/24/10

program: 
Radiozine
program date: 
Wed, 11/24/2010

Host Dave Mazza interviews travel writer Jeff Greenwald about his experiences in Nepal in the '90s during the "people power" uprising.  His new book Snake Lake explores his time beneath the Himalayas as he wins the friendship of a high lama who reveals the pillars of Tibetan Buddhism; embarks on a passionate romance; and discovers what democracy means to rural Nepalese citizens -- all while covering the revolution for a major US newspaper.

  • Length: 27:35 minutes (18.94 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 96Kbps (CBR)

Comments

Correction

 A typo occured with one of our guests, Todd Dalotto on Radiozine this past Friday. Our apologies for the oversight.

 

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