Old Mole Variety Hour

 

The Old Mole burrows down to the roots of the great issues of our time – the struggles of ordinary people for democratic and sustainable ways of life.  The Mole goes where corporate media fear to tread, supporting grassroots challenges to top-down authority and giving voice to movements that shake the foundations of an unjust society.  The Moles' perspective is democratic, broadly socialist, and feminist.  (We count Karl Marx as a friend).

Here is why we call this show "The Old Mole"

Old Mole on Facebook

 Our theme "Mole in the Ground" is by Bascom Lamar Lunsford  (1924), somtimes blended with a newer versions, like the one  by dj/rupture, sung by Sindhu Zagoren.  It's on the album Special Gunpowder

Our graphic lettering is  by Charlie Ertola.

You can leave comments for the Moles at  oldmolevarietyhour@gmail.com or by clicking on the comment section for any of our audio pieces.  

 

Episode Archive

Old Mole Variety Hour on 09/29/08

Air date: 
Mon, 09/29/2008 - 9:00am - 10:00am
Short Description: 
Does the financial meltdown spell the end of conservative economics?

On the Old Mole Variety Hour, we ask whether the financial collapse and the government bailout spells the end of  conservative economics.  Bill Resnick talks with Mark Engler, author of How to Rule the World: The Battle For the Global Economy (available as a gift for calling in during the show with a KBOO membership pledge).  We’ll also hear from local organizers of the Oregon Fair Trade Coalition and the Cross Border Organizing Committee about the Rural Organizing Project’s effort to defeat the Sizemore anti-immigrant ballot initiative.

Old Mole Variety Hour on 09/22/08

Air date: 
Mon, 09/22/2008 - 9:00am - 10:00am
Short Description: 
The Moles discuss the financial crisis and Sarah Palin and the Christian Right.

Get the Moles’ underground  analysis  of the current financial crisis as Bill Resnick  interviews John Miller from the Union of Radical Political Economists (URPE), and Tom Becker  reads from The  Nation’s William Greider.  Also on the show, Jan Haaken will be talking with Cynthia Burack about  Sarah Palin and the Christian Right.  Burack is the author  of Sin, Sex and Democracy: Anti-Gay Rhetoric and the Christian Right.

Old Mole Variety Hour on 09/15/08

Air date: 
Mon, 09/15/2008 - 9:00am - 10:00am
Short Description: 
Politics and Music of War and Peace

Listen to the Old Mole Variety hour Monday morning at 9:00 to hear the music of Victor Jara and learn about his life.  You’ll also find out what progressives can do to build popular support for a more peaceful foreign policy and why the Democrats are always playing defense against the Republican attack machine.

Old Mole Variety Hour on 09/08/08

Air date: 
Mon, 09/08/2008 - 9:00am - 10:00am
Short Description: 
The Moles discuss immigration issues and saving the city and the planet one neighborhood at a time

Luz María Gordillo will be your host, interviewing Chicana Rusty Barceló of the University of Minnesota.  Denise Morris will be talking with Amelia Cates from the Portland Central America Solidarity Committee about strategies for defeating the anti immigration measure on the ballot this November.  And Bill Resnick talks with two local gardening experts about sustainable gardening that can make every neighborhood a park. 

Old Mole Variety Hour on 08/25/08

Air date: 
Mon, 08/25/2008 - 9:00am - 10:00am

Cuba: Interview, film review and commentary.

Bill Resnick will interview Cuba expert Sam Farber. They will discuss Cuba in transition and the possibilities for development, self-determination and Socialist democracy. Movie Moles will review the 1964 film Soy Cuba! made by Russian film makers interested in telling the story of the Cuban revolution. Soy Cuba! was a breakthrough in filmmaking.
 

Old Mole Variety Hour on 08/04/08

Air date: 
Mon, 08/04/2008 - 9:00am - 10:00am
Short Description: 
Iraq: the current situation and how to get out

Hosted by Clayton Morgareidge, this show will feature a discussion with middle-east expert Antonia Juhasz about the situation in Iraq and how the US can get out without further harm to the Iraqi people.   We will also hear How the Garcia Girls Spent the Summer (that is, a movie review), why “democratic capitalism” is an oxymoron, and all about an artists’ collective that makes social protest posters

Old Mole Variety Hour on 07/28/08

Air date: 
Mon, 07/28/2008 - 9:00am - 10:00am
Short Description: 
Old Mole Variety Hour -- interviews and reviews from an underground perspective

What happens to victims when their assailants are given  "guilty except for insanity" sentences, as in the Richard Gillmore case?  Portland Attorney Mike Snedeker talks with Jan Haaken.  Book Mole Larry Bowlden will discuss Elizabeth Berg’s novel  The Art of Mending.  And Bill Resnick interviews Guy Dauncey about the technologies apppropriate for a greener and more democratic earth.

Old Mole Variety Hour on 07/21/08

Air date: 
Mon, 07/21/2008 - 9:00am - 10:00am
Short Description: 
Socialism for the rich, the state of the economy, and political art and theater

On the Old Mole Variety Hour, we will hear what’s ahead for the declining US economy, and how the welfare state for the rich socializes risks and privatizes profits: When corporations win, they win; when they lose, we all pay. The Moles will also talk with members of the Just Seeds Art Collective and review the play "Man to Man" about a German woman who switched identities to survive the Nazis.

Old Mole Variety Hour on 07/14/08

Air date: 
Mon, 07/14/2008 - 9:00am - 10:00am

Today's guests include MICHELLE HABELL-PALLAN, an associate professor of women’s studies at
University of Washington and author of
Loca
Motion: The Travels of Chicana and Latina Popular Culture.
She’ll talk about the profound influence of Latinos in American popular music. And local activist Maika Yeigh of the Lewis and Clark School of education, discusses the very
expensive "drill and kill" corporately- developed early reading
program pushed by the Bush Administration and purchased by Portland. 

 

Old Mole Variety Hour on 07/07/08

Air date: 
Mon, 07/07/2008 - 9:00am - 10:00am
Short Description: 
Music and interviews focusing on LGBTQ rights.

Today’s program  features Kate Reid, a charming and in-your-face songwriter whose music is full of great story-telling, humor, and political commentary.  Luz María Gordillo will interview  her.  Luz María will also talk with Adelina Anthony a Xicana-Indígena lesbian multi-disciplinary artist, originally from San Antonio, Texas. Her work addresses many issues affecting the lesbian/gay/bisexual/transgender/two-spirited communities.  The movie moles will  review a Lesbian spy spoof/satire called "D.E.B.S."   All this plus a Bill Resnick interview with professor of women's history and feminist studies Etstelle Freedman. 

Audio

Movie Moles on Omar (2013)

program date: 
Mon, 08/18/2014
Movie moles Joe Clement and Jan Haaken discuss the Palestinian film Omar, about life on both sides of the occupation wall. They note the film's exploration of the intimate power relations of occupied and occupier, the initial optimism of its title character, the complexities of trust and betrayal both personal and political, and the temptations of the promise of a sweet life.

Sisters of the Road: nourishing community

program date: 
Mon, 08/18/2014

Jan Haaken talks with volunteer and board member Robert Adams and co-manager Kris Soebroto of the non-profit Sisters of the Road Cafe in Old Town, which for nearly 35 years has been serving immediate needs and seeking systemic change. The Cafe offers hot meals in exchange for $1.50 cash, for work barter, or for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits. Work credits earned at Sisters can also be used at Portland Farmers' Markets, and field trips from Sisters introduce the farmer-vendors and explain how to use the foods they offer. Sisters also partners with the Sauvie Island Organics farm Food Works program, which teaches teenagers about farming. Jan, Robert, and Kris also discuss the central role of volunteers at Sisters of the Road: the organization recognizes that nourishment is about not just food but also community, and provides opportunities for people to come together.

Old Mole Variety Hour for 18 August 2014

program date: 
Mon, 08/18/2014
Old Mole Variety Hour
Frann Michel hosts this episode, with segments on police violence in Honduras, Ferguson, and Palestine, and on a local non-profit nourishing bodies and communities in Portland. Musical selections: Sound of da Police by KRS One; Call the Cops by Rob Hustle ft. Liv; Tired of Being Stepped On by the Click; and Revolution by Nina Simone.

Please become our friend on Facebook, and feel free to comment on our work or suggest topics for us to cover. 

To hear the whole show (including the music), use the play button below.  To hear individual pieces, follow these links:

Bill Resnick talks with Dana Frank about Honduras

Frann Michel shares left commentary on the militarizing of policing

Joe Clement and Jan Haaken review the Palestinian film Omar

Jan talks with Kris Soebroto and Robert Adams about Sisters of the Road Cafe

  • Title: aug182014omvh.m4a
  • Length: 57:31 minutes (26.33 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 64Kbps (CBR)

Six Thousand Years of Solar Energy

Categories:
program date: 
Mon, 08/11/2014
Solar energy goes back a long ways.  In this conversation with physicist John Perlin and the Old Mole's Bill Resnick, we learn just how far back -- to the ancient Chinese and the Romans.  With today's technology, solar power is ready to generate nearly all of our electricity.  John Perlin is the author, most recently, of Let It Shine: The Six-Thousand Year Story of Solar Energy.

Dying By Two Degrees

Categories:
program date: 
Mon, 08/11/2014
Writing in News Junkie Post, Dady Chery lays out the consequences for the planet of continuing on the energy path we are now on.  Tom Becker reads.  

Book Mole: "Orphan Train"

program date: 
Mon, 08/11/2014
As late as1939, orphans from eastern cities were taken west by train to be offered up for adoption to farmer and others, and often they were abused.  Christina Baker Kline's new novel, The Orphan Train is about the friendship that develops between two such orphans, one in her late teens, the other in her nineties.  Larry Bowlden gives us his take on it.  
You can read more reviews from Larry here

Old Mole Variety Hour for August 11, 2014

program date: 
Mon, 08/11/2014

Bill Resnick hosts this episode of the Old Mole as we explore climate change, solar energy, rape and the criminal justice system, and a novel about orphans being sent west to work.  We also hear fine, politically intelligent music from local singer - songwriter Dave Rovics.  
To hear the whole show (including the music), use the play button below.  To hear individual pieces, follow these links. Please become our friend on Facebook, and feel free to comment on our work or suggest topics for us to cover.  

1.  Bill Resnick talks with Pat Oherron about the solar panels on the Musicians Union Hall and the party this Sunday to celebrate.  

2.  Physicist John Perlin talks with Bill about the long history and the promising future of solar energy.

3.  Tom Becker reads Dady Chery's article on where current energy production is taking us.  

4.  The Left and the Law takes up "rape kits" as a tool for convicting the real perpetrator of rape.  

5.  Book Mole Larry Bowlden reviews Orphan Train, a new novel based on history, by Christina Baker Kline.  


Musician's Union Goes Solar

Categories:
program date: 
Mon, 08/11/2014
The Musicians' Union has installed solar panels on its building, and to celebrate, they are throwing a party with music, food, and drink this Sunday, August 17, 3-7 pm, 325 NE 20th Ave.  We hear Bill Resnick talking with Pat Oherron, a Portland surgeon and emergency room physician who did much of the organizing and planning to get the solar panels installed.  For more information, click here.  

Beyond Liberalism

program date: 
Mon, 08/04/2014

Clayton Morgareidge argues for why we need to "learn to see passed liberalism" and why "we must join and form and nurture political organizations that aim at transforming the capitalist and militarist system of power, which now governs our lives." He does this after admitting the many points of agreement between socialists, anti-capitalists, and liberals about poverty, inequality, war, racism, sexism, etc. He explains the problems of liberalism in terms of fetishizing moral persuasion before the power structures of state and corporate capital.

Clayton draws from Robin Marie Averbeck's Jacobin article Why I Am Not A Liberal. The song after Clayton is from a single released by Mischief Brew in 2013, "Free Radical Radio Fever".

  • Title: BeyondLiberalism
  • Genre: Other
  • Length: 9:33 minutes (8.75 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Movie Moles: Snowpiercer

program date: 
Mon, 08/04/2014
Frann Michel and Iven Hale review the film, Snowpiercer, currently playing in Portland at the not-for profit Hollywood theater, and available as video-on-demand for home viewing.

Loosely based on a French graphic novel of the same title, and co-written by Kelly Masterson and director Bong Joon-ho, Snowpiercer is the first (mostly) English-language film directed by South Korean Bong, whose earlier films include the 2006 monster movie The Host.

The premise of Snowpiercer is that an attempted technological fix for global warming has led to a massive ice age, and the only survivors are those on a perpetually moving train that circumnavigates the globe. The first-class passengers are in the front cars, while the tail section is filled with the poor who jumped on without tickets. Guards arrive at intervals to provide protein blocks for subsistence and sometimes take away children, or adults with useful skills.

The latest in a series of rebellions is led by Curtis, played by Chris Evans, and the rebels move forward several cars to the prison section where they free Namgoong Minsu, the man who built the doors dividing each car, and Namgoong frees his daughter Yona. (They are played by Song Kang-ho and Go Ah-sung, respectively, who also played father and daughter in he Host). By bribing Nam with the drug Kronol, and by fighting their way through variously defended and variously decorated sections of the train, the rebels manage to approach the engine. . . .

They discuss the film as an allegory of capitalism, and as addressing inequality more obviously than exploitation, how the film portrays the crisis inherent to capitalism, whether there is an alternative, and the figurative way the film's ending offers

They note it has a great cast but is another instance of characters of color relegated to secondary roles, and it
barely passes the Bechdel test.

It seems more optimistic with a figurative reading, or if you fancy the end of humanity.

But it's great visually, and worth  seeing.


Comments

Avatar's Jake Sully is ---- Tarzan - - -

 

A great review I've seen on Avatar (and how the soldier will save the people):

http://www.progressive.org/mp/danto010510.html

There is a link from there that exposes Cameron's plot as a mirror of Pocahontas, amazing parallel!      http://failblog.org/2010/01/10/avatar-plot-fail/

 

Since watching Avatar, I have viewed older videos on DVD and would rate that ahead of Avatar.

 

mel

 

 

 

commentary transcripts

It's convenient to have the Old Mole audio files available.
Even more useful for some of us would be transcripts of the commentaries (Clayton Morgareidge). Written material allows a person a chance to review, consider, digest and refer to mentioned references & thinkers. The "Well Read Red" commentary from 4 Aug 08 is a good example of a piece I'd like to read at my own pace.

transcripts

We will see to it that this happens whenever there is a prepared text. Thanks for the suggestion. Clayton Morgareidge The Old Mole Variety Hour

These folks are so profound

These folks are so profound and fascinating, especially the Resnick guy. Wow!

 

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