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Locus Focus

Locus Focus host Barbara Bernstein talks with local, regional and national experts, activists and policy makers about climate change, food policy, land use, salmon restoration, forest management and all the other things that matter in our environment.

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Episode Archive

THE CARNIVORE'S MANIFESTO

Program: 
Locus Focus
Air date: 
Mon, 07/21/2014 - 10:15am - 11:00am
Short Description: 
Building a sustainable food movement with founder Slow Food USA founder Patrick Martins
According to Patrick Martins, founder of Heritage Radio USA and Slow Food USA, it's futile for us to deny that we are carnivores. But in the face of a fast-food takeover and the destructive forces of factory farming, we need to make smart, informed choices about the food we eat and where it comes from.

On this episode of Locus Focus we talk with Martins, who along with Mike Edison, co-authored THE CARNIVORE'S MANIFESTO: Eating Well, Eating Responsibly, Eating Meat, a new book that cuts through organized zealotry and the misleading jargon of food labeling to outline realistic steps everyone can take to be part of the sustainable food movement.

Undermining: A Wild Ride Through Land Use, Politics, and Art in the Changing West

Program: 
Locus Focus
Air date: 
Mon, 07/14/2014 - 10:15am - 11:00am
Short Description: 
The politics of land use and art in an evolving New West, with author and activist Lucy Lippard.
Award-winning author, curator, and activist Lucy R. Lippard is one of America’s most influential writers on contemporary art, a pioneer in the fields of cultural geography, conceptualism, and feminist art. In her latest book Undermining: A Wild Ride Through Land Use, Politics, and Art in the Changing West, Lippard turns her eye to the politics of land use and art in an evolving New West.

FIGHTING GOLIATH

Program: 
Locus Focus
Air date: 
Mon, 07/07/2014 - 10:00am - 11:00am
Short Description: 
The frenetic exploitation of the Canadian Tar Sands and its rippling effect across the continent

The frenetic exploitation of the Canadian Tar Sands and its rippling effect across the continent

As if the Future Mattered, World Steward of Columbia Gorge Acts Locally, Globally

Program: 
Locus Focus
Air date: 
Mon, 06/30/2014 - 10:15am - 11:00am
Short Description: 
Interview with Hank Patton, founder of World Steward, and proponent of Intergenerational Finance

For over 30 years, World Steward has focussed on "the 'art and science' of managing resources as if the future mattered." Located in the Columbia Gorge, the center stewards farm and forestland, and fosters educational programs that engage students of all ages in the preservation of ecosystems and local economies.

Andrew Kimbrell on Labeling GE Foods, Banning GMO Crops and Organics and Beyond

Program: 
Locus Focus
Air date: 
Mon, 06/16/2014 - 10:15am - 11:10am
Short Description: 
Andrew Kimbrell, of the Center for Food Safety, on the campaigns to label GE foods and ban GE crops
Guest host Kathleen Stephenson speaks with Andrew Kimbrell. Founder and Executive Director of Center for Food Safety, about genetically engineered crops and food and the campaigns to label genetically engineered foods and ban genetically engineered crops.
 

Cristina Eisenberg on her new book, The Carnivore Way

Program: 
Locus Focus
Air date: 
Mon, 06/09/2014 - 10:15am - 11:00am
Short Description: 
Cristina Eisenberg on her new book, The Carnivore Way
Guest host Kathleen Stephenson interviews Cristina Eisenberg about her new book, "The Carnivore Way: Coexisting with and Conserving North America's Predators."  In "The Carnivore Way", Cristina Eisenberg argues for the necessity of top predators in large, undisturbed landscapes, and how a continental-long corridor — a "carnivore way" — provides room to roam and connected landscapes that allow them to disperse.

Dan Barber on "The Third Plate: Field Notes on the Future of Food"

Program: 
Locus Focus
Air date: 
Mon, 06/02/2014 - 10:15am - 11:00am
Short Description: 
Dan Barber on "The Third Plate: Field Notes on the Future of Food"

Chris Seigel guest hosts.

The Sixth Extinction: An Interview with author Elizabeth Kolbert

Program: 
Locus Focus
Air date: 
Mon, 05/19/2014 - 10:15am - 11:00am
Short Description: 
A conversation with Elizabeth Kolbert about the sixth mass extinction in our planet's history.

Over the last half a billion years, there have been five mass extinctions, when the diversity of life on earth suddenly and dramatically contracted.

5/12 - The West Without Water

Program: 
Locus Focus
Air date: 
Mon, 05/12/2014 - 10:15am - 11:00am
Short Description: 
Why California's current water crisis may be a harbinger of what the future holds.

The extreme drought that California is currently enduring may be a harbinger of climatic conditions to come. Geologic evidence spanning the last 10,000 years indicates that extended droughts and catastrophic floods plagued the West with regularity over the past two millennia. While the West may have temporarily buffered itself from such harsh climatic swings by engineering artificial environments, our modern civilization may be ill-prepared for the future climatic changes predicted to beset the region.

The Sixth Extinction: A Conversation with author Elizabeth Kolbert

Program: 
Locus Focus
Air date: 
Mon, 05/05/2014 - 10:15am - 11:00am
Short Description: 
A conversation with Elizabeth Kolbert about the sixth mass extinction in our planet's history.

THIS PROGRAM HAS BEEN RESCHEDULED FOR MONDAY, MAY 19 AT 10:15 AM.


Audio

FIGHTING CELLPHONE TOWERS: A Trumpeter-maker's Battle

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 04/19/2010

Cellphone towers have become ubiquitous and although the jury is out on their safety, few people bother anymore to fight new ones going up in their neighborhoods. The common wisdom is that you can't win. Even local jurisdictions, like city and county governments, have little power to stop the siting of a new tower.


But brass instrument maker Dave Monette is a rare fellow who not only took on the cellphone establishment but actually won. Dave loves to make trumpets and mouthpieces for brass instruments and his clients include many notable musicians including Thara Memory and Wynton Marsalis. He would much prefer to spend all his time doing what he loves, but recently he has spent a lot of time learning about cell tower placement law, because a cell tower was slated to go up next to his property on Mt. Hood. On this Locus Focus episode, Dave recounts his tale of battling the cellphone industry and how he emerged victorious. In the course of our discussion we talk about how little is known about the safety of these weapons of mass convenience that we sidle up to on a regular basis.

What Dave Monette has to say about himself:
I am the owner of a small trumpet factory.  I choose to work in Portland and live in the forest near Mt. Hood. I have been an amateur radio operator since 1970, and I am somewhat familiar with radio theory and RF engineering. I believe that eventually we will learn, as we have with tobacco, asbestos, pesticides, leaded paint, etc., that the health risks in using cell phones far exceed what is commonly understood. In my opinion, it is simply common sense that holding a microwave transmitter up against the side of your head is detrimental to one's health and well-being.

In my opinion, the convenience and the profits cell phones generate make this current world-wide wave of cell growth unstoppable - at least for now. In the last three or four months I have learned more about the law regarding cell tower placement than I could have ever imagined. I believe we should at the very least require cell transmitting equipment to be as far away from residential areas as possible. I also believe that government and private industry should actively work towards developing the next generation of communication technology that hopefully isn't also used to cook hamburgers!

URBAN FARMING

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 04/12/2010

The Importance of Eating Locally


The choice to eat locally grown food is turning into a movement, as more and more people recognize the importance of eating locally. But if you really want to eat locally grown food, the best way is to grow it yourself. Even if you live in the city. On this episode of Locus Focus we talk with an urban farmer in the Sellwood neighborhood of Portland and the owner of an urban farm store. Nikki Hill runs Riverhouse Farm, a community-supported agriculture operation on the banks of Crystal Springs in Sellwood. Started in 2007, the RiverHouse Farm CSA  is an 8,000 sq. ft organic farm that believes a sustainable farm functions as a healthy ecosystem. For the 2010 season they have added more growing space at GeerCrest Farm in Silverton and HeartField Farm in Milwaukie, to better serve their growing number of Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) members. We talk about why it's important to develop urban-rural farm networks like these in order to feed us all.

Our other guest is Naomi Montacre, one of the owners of a new farm store, Naomi's Organic Farm Supply, a few blocks north of Riverhouse Farm in the Sellwood neighborhood. Naomi's sells supplies for the urban homesteader, ranging from baby chicks to berry bushes. We talk with Naomi about why a neighborhood farm store has become a requisite feature in today's urban environment.

Coming events of interest to urban farmers:

Infarmation: http://naomisorganic.blogspot.com/2010/03/infarmation-starts-seeds-and-potatoes.html

Food and Climate Change: Step up the plate: http://www.portlandonline.com/bps/index.cfm?a=294789&c=44851

A City Hall Garden celebration / info fair and climate discussion with author Anna Lappé

Sunday, April 18 at 1 PM

According to author Anna Lappé, "If we are serious about addressing climate change we have to talk about food." Lappé will lead that conversation in Portland on Sunday, April 18 at 2 p.m. in the Portland Building when she participates in a panel discussion, Food and the Climate Challenge: Step Up to the Plate. This free event will also include other area experts discussing how food affects our personal and environmental health and the simple steps we all can take to make a difference.

The panel will follow a celebration of Portland City Hall's Better Together Garden's second year and a food gardening information fair. OSU Master Gardeners, Oregon Tilth, Growing Gardens, The Portland Tree Project and the City of Portland Community Garden program will be present to answer questions in the garden at 1221 S.W. Fourth Avenue, Portland.

Lappé's recently released book, Diet for a Hot Planet, The Climate Crisis at the End of Your Fork and What You Can Do About It, states that our food system is likely responsible for a third of global greenhouse gas emissions. Yet, Johns Hopkins University reports that of four thousand articles on climate change published in sixteen leading U.S. newspapers, only 1 percent had a "substantial focus" on food and agriculture.

Just as Diet for a Small Planet, written by Anna's mother, Francis Moore Lappé, revolutionized our food consciousness in 1972, Diet for a Hot Planet will change the way we look at today's most pressing issue. Anna Lappé provides a clear account of our current condition and a road map of seven principles for a climate-friendly diet that can heal the planet.

THE YES MEN FIX THE WORLD

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 04/05/2010

Sometimes the best way to expose the truth is to lie. . .


At least, that's the approach that the Yes Men take as they try to fix the world, exposing corporate greed and lies and the painful inconsistencies between what corporate elites say in public and what they actually practice. The Yes Men are Mike Bonanno and Andy Bichlbaum, and in recent years they have spoken truth to power by impersonating corporate and government figures at conferences and even before an audience of 300 million on BBC television. This week on Locus Focus we will be joined by Yes Man Andy Birchlbaum, who will be sharing the stories behind the making of their recent movie, The Yes Men Fix the World. We'll hear how they got the world to believe for one hour that Dow Chemical would finally become a responsible corporate citizen and make long overdue payments to the victims of the devastating 1984 gas explosion in Bhopal, India . . . and other fantastic exploits.

CAN URBAN ROOFTOPS PROVIDE HABITAT FOR WILDLIFE?

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 03/29/2010

Much of our urban landscape is paved over or covered with buildings, creating an environment that is the antithesis of nature. Rooftops and asphalt flush rain water into storm sewers, overburdening and polluting our rivers. Portland is fast becoming a leader in promoting vegetated rooftops to capture stormwater. Is it possible to go even further and actually create functional wildlife habitat on buildings that will help birds, bats, bugs and other animals as they traverse our urban landscape?

On this episode of Locus Focus our guests are Dusty Gedge, an international authority on ecoroofs, and the ecoroof expert for Portland Bureau of Environmental Services, Tom Liptan. We talk about how we can transform the rooftops of downtown skyscrapers, industrial warehouses and even our own residences into wildlife habitat. Could thousands of acres of grey industrial warehouse rooftops in the Columbia Corridor be converted to meadows for rapidly disappearing meadowlarks and streaked horned larks? Could the tops of our downtown skyscrapers provide migrating songbirds with a source for insects and a place to rest? What can we do on top of our own houses to support local wildlife?

International authority on ecoroofs, Dusty Gedge has been campaigning to get green roofs installed for biodiversity in London for over 15 years. He currently Director of Livingroofs.org the UK's independent greenroof organization and the current President of the European Federation of Green Roof Associations. He is recognized as a leading authority on green roofs and biodiversity and has written a number of papers and articles on the subject over the years. He also wrote a seminal paper that lead to the introduction of the green roof policy in the Greater London area. In 2005 he won the Andrew Lees Memorial Award at the British Environment and Media Awards.

EARTHQUAKES ALONG THE PACIFIC RIM

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 03/22/2010

As aftershocks from the massive earthquake last month in Chile continue to shake the earth, this week on Locus Focus, we look at why the earthquake that wreaked so much devastation in Chile is relevant to the rest of us living along the Pacific Rim. What does the Pacific NW have in common seismically with Chile and what can we learn from the Chileans about earthquake preparedness?

We talk about the science of earthquakes and the importance of earthquake preparedness with Portland State University Geology professor, Scott Burns. Scott will help us understand what all the shaking going on, is all about.

Scott Burns is a professor of Geology at Portland State University, who specializes in soils, floods, landslides, earthquakes and helping the rest of us learn how to prepare for the inevitable cataclysms that periodically shake up the Pacific Northwest.

You can watch seismic activity along the Pacific rim at Portland State Universities Seismic Station.

PREPARING FOR CLIMATE CHANGE

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 03/15/2010

Climate scientists tell us that even if greenhouse gas emissions were halted tomorrow, the world's climate would not stabilize for decades. So even as we continue to reduce our carbon footprint, we need to start adapting to the inevitable. This morning we look at strategies that communities must begin to adopt to mitigate the worst impacts of climate change while preparing to adapt to its consequences. Guest is Brian Barr, with the National Center for Conservation Science & Policy in Ashland, talks about a project he is working on, in collaboration with the Climate Leadership Initiative from the University of Oregon, to start developing climate change preparation plans for river basins around the state of Oregon. 

Brian Barr is an aquatic ecologist with over 16 years of experience on trout and salmon restoration in the Pacific and intermountain west. Over the past nine years, Brian has focused his attention on improving fish passage conditions in the Rogue and Klamath Rivers of southern Oregon and northern California. Recently, he has turned his attention to the emerging impacts of climate change, how those impacts are likely to affect communities and natural resources, and what we can do to prepare ourselves and the resources we depend upon to withstand these effects. In his off time, Brian fishes, watches his daughter ride horses, and bites his fingernails during Virginia Tech football games.

Climate Change is a Women's Issue

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 03/08/2010

Discussions about climate change usually focus on rising sea levels and reducing carbon emissions. What we don't hear about much is how climate change disproportionately impacts the lives of women in the developing world. On this special International Women's Day segment of Locus Focus, we look at why climate change is a women's issue, and learn about initiatives that can help women in the developing world to reduce the carbon footprints of their communities while at the same time empowering their lives.

Guest Laurie Mazur is the editor of a new book called A Pivotal Moment: Population, Justice and the Environmental Challenge, which looks at the urgent need to examine inequalities–both gender and economic–that underlie rapid population growth, which is a contributing cause of climate change. On this program we hear why in order to slow population growth and build a sustainable future, women and men need access to voluntary family planning and other reproductive health services, as well as education and employment opportunities.

Laurie Mazur is the director of the Population Justice Project. She is the editor of Beyond the Numbers: A Reader on Population, Consumption and the Environment (1994) and co-author of Marketing Madness: A Survival Guide for a Consumer Society (1995).

SUSTAINABLE SELLWOOD: THE MAKING OF COMMUNITY

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 03/01/2010

Last year a group of Sellwood residents created a neighborhood movement that helped shape the design and impact of the soon-to-be rebuilt Sellwood Bridge. At the height of this organizing drive, a neighborhood march drew hundreds of people from all corners of the neighborhood, united in a desire for a bridge that enhances the neighborhood's pedestrian and bicycle-oriented qualities. Locus Focus host Barbara Bernstein took part in the march and it was there that she met some of the guests on this week's Locus Focus, who join her for a discussion about creating sustainable projects in our neighborhoods that not only help mitigate climate change but also build a sense of community.

Philip Krain is a former board member of SMILE, the Sellwood-Moreland neighborhood association where he has been spearheading neighborhood environmental initiatives, including new bicycle boulevard improvements on SE Spokane Street. He is now heads SMILE's sustainability committee and is working on building a "Sustainable Sellwood" website, listserv and neighborhood activity program.

Pedro Ferbel-Azcarate has lived in Sellwood since 1998 and was involved in the development of Share It Square at the intersection of SE Sherritt and 9th in Sellwood. He and his wife Adriana began pioneering permaculture features, including water catchment systems, gardening and compost systems, creative urban living rehabs, and the first cob structure built in the city of portland, which was also the founding project of what is now known as the Village Building Convergence, now in its 10th year. Share It Square has continued to grow since its inception, bringing together neighbors to design and build amenities in the public right of way and have organized numerous large events in the square, including weddings. Share It Square models the simple idea that when neighbors have a commons, they communicate and create opportunities that impact the whole neighborhood.

Democratizing the Energy Grid

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 02/22/2010

Oregon is about to institute a new incentive for households to power themselves using alternative energy sources like solar and wind. This method is called Feed-in Tarriff and is already in place in much of Germany as well as Vermont. Mark Pengilly and Judy Barnes, with Oregonians for Renewable Energy, join Locus Focus host Barbara Bernstein for a discussion about how feed-in tarrif can help democratize the energy grid. They'll talk about what feed-in tariffs are all about and where they fit into an overall renewable energy policy that moves us toward a sustainable solution to climate change and helps accomplish the switch from a fossil-fuel-based economy.

Judy Barnes and Mark Pengilly are with Oregonians for Renewable Energy Policy, a project of the Alliance for Democracy. They are helping design and support adoption of Feed-In Tariff policies for Oregon that produce good social, economic and environmental outcomes at reasonable costs.

What the Heck is a Green Bridge?

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 02/15/2010

Oregon has set ambitious goals for reducing our carbon emissions by 2020. But if all the currently proposed highway projects are built, any reductions that are achieved in other areas will be canceled out by increased auto use. How do plans to replace the I5 bridge between Washington and Oregon fit into this dilemma? While the proposed replacement bridge is being touted as a "green" bridge, most scenarios show that the currently proposed 12-lane bridge will only increase car trips across the Columbia River and help defeat the region's goal to dramatically reduce our carbon footprint. Should the new bridge have fewer lanes? Should there be tolls? Will light rail and bike lanes help reduce driving? Or should we not build a new bridge at all?

On this episode of Locus Focus we hear several perspectives on what to do about the Columbia River Crossing. Guests include Metro Councilor Robert Liberty, Portland Mayor Sam Adams, Vancouver's new mayor Tim Leavitt and Clark County Commissioner Steve Stuart.

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