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Locus Focus

Locus Focus host Barbara Bernstein talks with local, regional and national experts, activists and policy makers about climate change, food policy, land use, salmon restoration, forest management and all the other things that matter in our environment.

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Episode Archive

Locus Focus

Program: 
Locus Focus
Air date: 
Wed, 07/08/2009 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
Kim Klein, legendary grassroots non-profit fundraising consultant, talks about the challenges and op

The economic meltdown of the past year has created exceptional challenges for the non-profit sector of our society. Kim Klein, legendary grassroots non-profit fundraising consultant, joins Locus Focus host Barbara Bernstein to discuss why these hard times are providing not only difficulties but also opportunities for grassroots social change organizations. We'll talk with Kim about about war, locusts, famine and community organizing and find out how grassroots activists can take advantage of some unique opportunities hidden in the folds of this economic downturn.

Locus Focus

Program: 
Locus Focus
Air date: 
Wed, 07/01/2009 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
Understanding the ramifications of climate change through images

Locus Focus host Barbara Bernstein interviews NASA climate scientist Gavin Schmidt, co-author and editor of an unprecedented union of scientific analysis and photography illustrating the effects of climate change on the global ecosystem. Gavin Schmidt talks about how his new book illustrates the ramifications of shifting climate for human society, by including photographic spreads (including a photo essay by Oregon photographer Gary Braasch) and satellite imagery that show us retreating glaciers, sinking villages in Alaska's tundra, and drying lakes, as well as text following adventurous scientists from the ice caps at the poles to the coral reefs of the tropics.

Locus Focus

Program: 
Locus Focus
Air date: 
Wed, 06/24/2009 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
A proposed baseball stadium in Lents has been derailed. How did this happen and why is it good for L

It looks like the contentious baseball stadium in Lents Park is a not going to be built after all. But there’s still plenty to chew on in the aftermath of its demise. In this segment we talk about why building a stadium in Lents' only park was opposed by so many neighborhood people as well as social justice and environmental activists across the city, why the campaign to stop the stadium was a success and how do we prevent a bad proposal like this in the future. Locus Focus host Barbara Bernstein is joined by Lents Stadium Issue Organizers - Kathleen Juergens de Ponce and  - and Dianne Riley with the Coalition for a Livable Future.

Locus Focus

Program: 
Locus Focus
Air date: 
Wed, 06/17/2009 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
How Sunday Parkways reduces carbon emissions, builds community and raises Portland's Happiness Quoti

This week Linda Ginenthal with Transportation Options joins Locus Focus host Barbara Bernstein to talk about Sunday Parkways. Modeled after Bogotá, Colombia’s Ciclovias, held every Sunday on 70 miles of streets, Portland's first Sunday Parkways was last summer, drawing 15,000 Portland area residents to bike and walk through neighborhoods in North Portland. Sunday Parkways is about connecting neighborhoods and people: walkers, runners, bikers, seniors, adults, and children enjoying neighborhood streets filled with surprises, performers, physical activities, and food – all in a car-free environment.

Locus Focus

Categories:
Program: 
Locus Focus
Air date: 
Wed, 06/10/2009 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
While Portland may be ahead of the curve in taking on the challenge of climate change, there's still

Portland was one of the first American cities to take climate change seriously. In 2007, Portland was the only large metro area in the U.S. that actually reduced its carbon emissions below 1990 levels. But that doesn't mean we can just rest on our laurels. If this region is to succeed in radically reducing our carbon footprint, there’s a lot more work to be done. This morning Portland Mayor Sam Adams joins Locus Focus host Barbara Bernstein to unveil Portland's new Climate Action Plan.

 

http://www.portlandonline.com/osd/index.cfm?c=41896

Locus Focus

Program: 
Locus Focus
Air date: 
Wed, 06/03/2009 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
What are the national and international causes of the current economic meltdown and how it can be fi

Once again Locus Focus host Barbara Bernstein takes on the economic meltdown and today she has help navigating this maelstrom from Dan Leahy, professor of Labor Studies at the Evergreen State College.

 

Dan sorts through the financial mumbo jumbo and hocus pocus that has shaken the world's economy for the past year and explores local initiatives that may help put the economy together, one community at a time.

Locus Focus

Program: 
Locus Focus
Air date: 
Wed, 05/27/2009 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
How will salmon policy change under the Obama Administration? A key meeting this week gives us some

For eight years the Bush administration did everything in their power to impede real salmon recovery along the Columbia River. Now it is the Obama administration's turn to take a serious look at restoring adequate salmon runs to our region. It started this week with high-level Obama administration officials, including NOAA Administrator Dr. Jane Lubchenco, meeting in Portland with representatives from Northwest states and Tribes. However, fishermen and salmon advocates were blocked from the meeting.

 

 

Locus Focus

Program: 
Locus Focus
Air date: 
Wed, 05/20/2009 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
The Great Blue Heron has been Portland's official city bird since 1986. And next week is Great Blue

In 1986 Mike Houck approached then mayor Bud Clark to seek recognition of the Great Blue Heron as Portland's official city bird.  Within two weeks of Clark's signature "whoop, whoop!" Portland City Council had adopted the heron as the city's icon for natural resource protection and access to nature in the city. This week Bob Sallinger, Director of the Audubon Society of Portland's Conservation Program;  Mike Houck, Executive Director of the Urban Greenspaces Institute; and  Nick Fish, the new City of Portland Parks Commissioner join Locus Focus host Barbara Bernstein to celebrate Great Blue Heron Week and the city's commitment to ensuring this majestic bird continues to share the city with its human inhabitants.  The program highlights events and field trips for this year's annual Great Blue Heron Week which runs from May 27th through Sunday morning, June 7th when a flotilla of kayaks and canoes will circumnavigate Ross Island, home to one of the region's many heron nesting colonies.

http://www.audubonportland.org/about/events/gbheron

Locus Focus

Program: 
Locus Focus
Air date: 
Wed, 05/13/2009 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
With Ben Davis, Professor of law at the University of Toledo College of Law, we talk about how to ma

The Bush administration is now history but their criminal acts live on. How do we as a nation hold these characters accountable for the many apparent crimes they committed during the past 8 years. Locus Focus host Barbara Bernstein talks with Ben Davis, Professor of law at the University of Toledo College of Law, about his efforts to get attorney general Eric Holder "to appoint a non-partisan independent Special Counsel to immediately commence a prosecutorial investigation into the most serious alleged crimes of former President George W. Bush, former Vice President Richard B. Cheney, the attorneys formerly employed by the Department of Justice whose memos sought to justify torture, and other former top officials of the Bush administration."

Locus Focus

Program: 
Locus Focus
Air date: 
Wed, 05/06/2009 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
The recent oubreak of swine raises questions about how many people or livestock can live crowded con

The recent outbreak of H1N1 Flu (or swine flu) is raising questions about potential links between pandemics and population stability. For a few days last week a large hog farm in Veracruz was being blamed for the outbreak of swine flu in Mexico, and although that connection has been challenged the question remains: how do our practices of raising crops and livestock as well as the constraints of unrestrained population growth create conditions for potential pandemics.

This installment of Locus Focus takes on that controversial issue among environmentalists: how do we (or should we) limit population growth, especially growth due to immigration. Our guest Leon Kolankiewicz is an environmental scientist and national natural resources planner. He has a B.S. in forestry and wildlife management from Virginia Tech and an M.S. in environmental planning and natural resources management from the University of British Columbia. His professional experience includes stints with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Marine Fisheries Service, Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation, Alaska Department of Fish and Game, University of Washington, University of New Mexico, and as an environmental planner with the Orange County, (Ca.) Environmental Management Agency. Mr. Kolankiewicz is the author of Where Salmon Come to Die: An Autumn on Alaska’s Raincoast.

Audio

GIFTS OF THE CROW - An Interview with Author and Ornithologist John Marzluff

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 06/11/2012

Several years ago Locus Focus host Barbara Bernstein watched a crow delicately extract from a narrow paper bag a Subway sandwich that was lying in the gutter. Once the sandwich was free of its wrapper, the crow remained curbside, happily feasting on its prize. This observation gave Barbara a newfound fascination and respect for crows. As it turns out, the wily intelligence she witnessed that morning is a common attribute of crows and their corvid relatives: ravens, magpies and jays. Crows are not only extremely smart, they also have highly developed social skills, and it turns out, share many qualities with humans, which occasionally inspires interspecies communication between corvids and people. On this episode of Locus Focus we learn about our uniquely symbiotic relationship with crows as we find out what goes on in a crow's brain that makes them such fascinating creatures. Guest John Marzluff is author of a new book, Gifts of the Crow, that takes us on a tour of the corvid brain from perspectives of biology, chemistry and whimsy.

John Marzluff, PhD, is a professor of wildlife science at the University of Washington's School of Environmental and Forest Sciences. His research on corvids and birds of prey has benefited birds all over the world, from pinyon jays in Arizona, ravens in Greenland and golden eagles and prairie falcons in Idaho to Washington State's goshawks and the endangered Hawaiian hawk, one of the rarest birds in the world. He has conducted long-term studies of urbanization on songbirds in the Seattle area; responses of nest predators and songbirds to settlements, recreation and forest fragmentation on the Olympic Peninsula; and endangered species conservation. When he's not looking skyward, Dr. Marzluff enjoys fishing and dog-sledding.

THE CRASH COURSE with CHRIS MARTENS: Understanding the Interdependence of our Economy, Environment, and Energy Systems

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 06/04/2012

Chris Martenson used to be part of the 1%. Five years ago he traded his McMansion and position as Vice President of a Fortune 500 company for a much simpler life in rural western Massachusetts. Now his goal is to shed light on the limits of our present economic model of infinite growth as we increasingly face the realities of a planet with finite resources. His video lecture series "The Crash Course" takes on the future challenges of our economy, energy systems and the environment. According to Martenson, "it's where these fields intersect that the greatest story of any generation will be told."

On this episode of Locus Focus, we are joined by Chris Martenson who will share the information gathered over a period of five years, revealing the interdependence of our economy, environment, and energy systems.

WHY THE O&C TRUST ACT CAN'T SEE THE FOREST FOR THE TREES?

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 05/28/2012

For the past year Oregon news has been filled with stories of timber-dependent counties on the brink of bankruptcy. Beginning in 1937 these 18 western Oregon counties benefited from federal timber receipts, as they overcut old growth forests on western BLM lands—the so-called "O&C" lands granted to the Oregon and California Railroad in 1866 and taken back by the government in 1916 for violating terms of the land grant. The unsustainable clearcutting of old-growth forests, and the receipts they generated, plummeted in the early 1990s when the threat to salmon, wildlife, clean water and watersheds could no longer be ignored. Congress cushioned the fall by instituting direct federal payments to help transition the counties away from dependence on federal subsidies. These payments expired this year.

To solve the financial crisis facing these counties, three members of Oregon's congressional delegation (Peter De Fazio, Kurt Schraer and Greg Walden) are proposing legislation that would creat a timber trust on two thirds of the O&C lands' 2.6 million acres, managed for the sole purpose of maximizing revenues from logging for the benefit of the 18 O&C counties in Western Oregon.

On this episode of Locus Focus we talk with Randi Spivak, Vice President of Government Affairs with the Geos Institute in Ashland, about why Oregon's conservation movement is not pleased with this proposed legislation and what are some alternative solutions to the O&C counties' fiscal crisis.

Click here to read the Geos Institute's Report on how to solve the Western Oregon County Payments Impasse

JUST HOW CLEAN ARE ELECTRIC CARS: An Interview with Don Anair, Union of Concerned Scientists

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 05/21/2012

Everybody knows an electric car doesn’t use gasoline, but since it gets its power from the electric grid, the question remains: How clean is an electric car?

A new report from the Union of Concerned Scientists, “State of Charge: Electric Vehicles’ Global Warming Emissions and Fuel Cost Savings Across the United States,” is a first-of-its-kind analysis of the emissions EVs create from charging on an electric grid and how the cost of that charging compares to filling up a gasoline-powered vehicle. On this episode of Locus Focus we talk with Don Anair, the report’s author and senior engineer for UCS’s Clean Vehicles Program about the report’s findings and what is the future for electric vehicles.

Don Anair is an engineer in the California office of the Union of Concerned Scientists' (UCS) Clean Vehicles Program working on state and national transportation, air quality, and global warming policy. As part of his work on heavy-duty vehicle issues, Mr. Anair analyzes the impact of diesel pollution on public health and air quality. He is the author of three reports, "Sick of Soot," "Digging Up Trouble," and "Delivering the Green," which focus on the impacts and solutions to reduce diesel emissions. He is also an advocate for groundbreaking diesel clean-up and greenhouse gas efforts in the state and around the country, including regulations, incentive programs, and legislation. Don also evaluates hybrid and advanced vehicle technologies and is author of the Hybrid Scorecard.

FOOD FIGHT: What You Need to Know about the Food and Farm Bill with Dan Imhoff

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 05/14/2012

Why should you care about the Farm Bill if you're not a farmer or live in a farm state? The short answer is: because you eat and the Farm Bill is really about how our food is grown, what kinds of food gets grown and who gets to eat it.

Every five years, Congress revisits and passes a massive but little understood legislation known as the Farm Bill. Originally conceived as an emergency bailout for millions of farmers and unemployed during the dark times of the Dust Bowl and Great Depression, the Farm Bill has snow-balled into one of the most—if not the most—significant forces affecting food, farming, and land-use in the United States. Over the decades its purpose has shifted from helping small family farmers survive hard times to providing massive corporate welfare payments to mega agribusiness farms. And only those benefiting from its largesse have orchestrated what went into each Farm Bill. Now things are changing as food justice activists, organic farming advocates and others lobbying for input into the next Farm Bill coming down the pike this fall.

On this episode of Locus Focus we are joined by Daniel Imhoff, author of Food Fight: The Citizen's Guide to the Next Food and Farm Bill, who will help us navigate the complexities of this little understood but extremely important legislation known as the Farm Bill.

Daniel Imhoff is a highly sought-after public speaker who lectures and conducts workshops on a variety of topics, from food and farming to environmental design and conservation. He has appeared on hundreds of national and regional radio and television programs, including CBS Sunday Morning, Science Friday, and West Coast Live. Dan is the president and co-founder of Watershed Media, a non-profit publishing house based in Healdsburg, California. His books include Building with Vision, Farming with the Wild, Paper or Plastic, The CAFO Reader: The Tragedy of Industrial Animal Factories, and many others. Dan’s books have gained national attention with coverage in the San Francisco Chronicle, Newsweek, the San Jose Mercury News, the Los Angeles Times, and the Chicago Tribune. He has testified before Congress and spoken at numerous conferences, corporate and government offices, and college campuses, including Stanford University, the University of Pennsylvania, Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, the University of California at Berkeley, and the Vermont Law School.

He is the president and a co-founder of the Wild Farm Alliance, a ten-year-old national organization that works to promote agriculture systems that support and accommodate wild nature. Dan lives on a small homestead farm in Northern California. http://www.watershedmedia.org

Food Fight 2012: Why the Farm Bill Matters to All of Us

May 22, 2012 6:00 pm at the Ecotrust Building – 721 NW 9th Ave, Portland, OR

Join author Daniel Imhoff and Congressman Earl Blumenauer for a conversation about the Farm Bill, why it matters to you, and what you can do about it.

GARBOLOGY: Our Dirty Love Affair with Trash - An Interview with author Edward Humes

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program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 05/07/2012

What is America's largest export, most prodigious product and greatest legacy? It's our trash. Each of us in on track to toss 102 tons of garbage in the course of our lifetime. Our disposable plastic alone outweighs the entire U.S;. Navy. But we don't like to think about our trash. We send it on trains, trucks or barges to landfills  hundreds of miles from where the garbage was created. We don't have to see it, but in so many ways the disposable, non-biodegradable items that fill our trash are coming back to haunt us, in forms like the Great Pacific Garbage patch of plastic that threatens marine life and ultimately our own.

On this episode of Locus Focus we talk with Pulitzer Prize Winner Edward Humes, whose new book Garbology: Our Dirty Love Affair with Trash, boggles the mind with the severity of our trashy ways. But it also shares compelling stories of families, companies and communities that are finding a way back from all that trash.

Edward Humes received a Pulitzer Prize for his newspaper coverage of the military. He has written for the New York Times, Los Angeles Times and Los Angeles Magazine and is the author of eleven nonfiction books. He lives in Seal Beach, CA.

PROTECTING OLD-GROWTH FORESTS: Keys to Prepare for Climate Change

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program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 04/23/2012

This past winter the Forest Service released its long anticipated final planning rule for the nation's 155 national forests and 20 national grasslands. The plan validates what many scientists have been saying for years: mature and old-growth forests play a critical role in reducing climate change and providing clean drinking water to millions of Americans. On this episode of Locus Focus, we talk with Dominick A. DellaSala, Chief Scientist and President of the Geos Institute in Ashland, Oregon, about why we need to remain vigilant about protecting our precious forest resources, especially in this current political climate in which amped up logging is being promoted as job creation.

Dr. Dominick A. DellaSala, President and Chief Scientist of the Geos Institute in Ashland, Oregon is an internationally renowned author of over 150 technical papers, including the award winning “Temperate and Boreal Rainforests of the World” (www.islandpress.org/dellasala). He has appeared in National Geographic, Science Digest, Science Magazine, Time Magazine, Audubon Magazine, National Wildlife Magazine, High Country News, Terrain Magazine, NY Times, LA Times, USA Today, Jim Lehrer News Hour, CNN, MSNBC, “Living on Earth (NPR),” and several PBS wildlife documentaries. He has testified in congressional hearings in defense of the Endangered Species Act, roadless area conservation, national monument designations, forest protections, and climate change among others. His rainforest book received an academic excellence award in 2012 from Choice magazine, one of the nation's premier book review journals. Dominick co-founded the Geos Institute in July 2006. He is motivated by leaving a living planet for his daughter and all those to follow.

NESTLE IN THE GORGE

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program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 04/16/2012

In late February the Oregon Water Resources Department (OWRD) issued the first set of permits necessary to facilitate Nestlé’s proposal to take and bottle water in the Columbia River Gorge. This decision came despite overwhelming public opposition to the plan. Now opponents are taking the next steps to prevent Nestle's Cascade Locks bottled water facility from becoming a reality. Why are so many people opposed to this bottled water plant? What impact will diverting water from Oxbow Spring, a pristine stream in the Columbia Gorge, have on fish and wildlife habitat? On this episode of Locus Focus we speak with Julia DeGraw, Northwest Organizer with Food & Water Watch, one of the groups spearheading the campaign to stop Nestle from bottling Oregon's public water for private profit.

To learn more about the campaign to stop Nestle from building a bottled water facility in the Columbia Gorge and what you can do to stop it, check out: http://keepnestleout.wordpress.com/

HOUSING RECLAIMED: SUSTAINABLE HOMES FOR NEXT TO NOTHING

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program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 04/09/2012

The American Dream of owning your own home has been battered by the economic crisis that started in 2008. While it has become much harder harder to achieve this dream, there is a surge of interest in finding resourceful, affordable and environmentally friendly ways of creating housing to meet this challenge. On this episode of Locus Focus we talk with Jessica Kellner, editor of Natural Home and Garden Magazine, about some alternative approaches that non-conventional home builders are taking to build homes that reduce landfill waste, rely on recycled or sustainably sourced material, cost relatively little money and help create stronger communities. We also hear from Portland contractor Renee LaChance, who specializes in sustainable remodeling. She talks about how to choose construction materials that are both sustainable and durable, reducing the carbon footprint of your construction, and how to make sustainable remodeling or new construction affordable.

Jessica Kellner, editor of Natural Home & Garden magazine is a passionate advocate of using architectual salvage to create aesthetically beautiful, low-cost housing.

Renee LaChance is the founder of Sustainable Adaptations, specializing in designing new construction and remodels that are and energy efficient and sustainable. Renee believes urban infill protects greenspaces. She thinks building small is more sustainable. She enjoys helping her clients realize their dreams for their property without breaking the bank or contributing to global warming. She looks forward to installing a roof with solar powered shingles when they become available in 2011.

THE FUTURE IS NOT ALL DOOMED - A Conversation with Carl Safina

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program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 04/02/2012

In this age of climate change, species extinction and exponentially expanding human population, it's hard not to feel like we're doomed. So it's important that we find voices to listen to that offer some glimmers of hope. On this episode of Locus Focus we are joined again by writer and marine conservationist Carl Safina, who has witnessed as well as anyone, how much damage results from too many humans obsessed with using up every ounce of our planet's natural resources without concern for future generations. Yet Safina remains a voice of hope as he searches for examples of what is working. His writing offers models for how we can re-orient our values, visions and practices of living on the earth like we are part of its natural systems.

"Each time science tightens a coil in the slack of our understanding, it further elaborates its fundamental discovery: connection. Because the greatest thing a human being can experience is a sense of connection, this is a joyful coincidence. What we need to do is also what our souls yearn to do: connect, connect, connect. And because all things are linked, almost anything can unite us with almost everything. Even a fish suffices." Carl Safina—from Prelude to A View From Lazy Point

Carl Safina is a prominent ecologist and marine conservationist and president of  Blue Ocean Institute, an environmental organization based in Cold Spring Harbor, New York. A winner of the prestigious Pew Fellowship, MacArthur Fellowship and Guggenheim Fellowship, Safina has written five books — Song for the Blue Ocean: Encounters Along the World's Coasts and Beneath the Seas; Eye of the Albatross: Visions of Hope and Survival; Voyage of the Turtle: In Pursuit of the Earth's Last Dinosaur; Nina Delmar: The Great Whale Rescue; The View from Lazy Point: A Natural Year in an Unnatural World, and due out in April of 2011, A Sea in Flames: The Deepwater Horizon Oil Blowout. Safina’s new TV series, Saving the Ocean, premiered on PBS in April 2011.

Follow more of Carl's adventures on his blog.

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